Best Chemistry Education podcasts — The study of Chemistry (Updated September 2017; image)
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Chemistry in its element
Weekly
 
A weekly tour of the periodic table, from Chemistry World, the magazine of the Royal Society of Chemistry.
 
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Chemistry World Podcast
Monthly
 
Monthly podcast from Chemistry World, the magazine of the Royal Society of Chemistry.
 
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Organic Chemistry - Audio
Daily+
 
Organic Chemistry - Audio
 
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Analytical Chemistry Podcast
Monthly
 
Analytical Chemistry is a peer-reviewed research journal that explores the latest concepts in analytical measurements and the best new ways to increase accuracy, selectivity, sensitivity, and reproducibility.
 
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Principles of Chemical Science (2008)
 
Principles of Chemical Science (2008)
 
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Chemistry World Book Club
Monthly
 
Join us to discuss the latest in popular science books. We interview authors and dissect the issues raised by each book. It's a book review with a difference.
 
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show series
 
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Chemistry World Book Club
 
Things go from bad to worse for Mackenzie Smith when her data disappears, her lab rats are killed, and she is accused of fraud. But slowly she stars to discover who might be behind her misfortune following a series of clues her late colleague left behind. In this month’s podcast, we discuss the novel A course in deception by Jana Rieger.…
 
A pyrophoric reagent that remains one of chemistry’s staples and the liquid salts that can tame its wild reactivity
 
Mike Freemantle introduces a pigment used by William Morris that also gave the Redcoats their distinctive hue
 
Tabitha Watson introduces a poisonous, corrosive and extremely reactive compound that will start 'roaring reactions' with almost anything
 
A lightweight, bulletproof material made from ice and wood pulp
 
Kat Arney explains the unlikely link between fake snow and babies' nappies
 
Mike Freemantle discusses the drug that keeps his gout at bay
 
Next year will see the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelly's classic, Frankenstein; or, the modern Prometheus. To celebrate this, a new edition has been release with annotations aimed at scientists and engineers. This edition of the podcast includes a classic extract from the book, an interview with David H Guston, one of the ed ...…
 
When you need to get your glassware extremely clean, you need a cleaning solution with real 'bite'
 
Wood has been vital in the development of human civilisation. Brian Clegg looks at the compound at its heart
 
Mike Freemantle introduces a chemical weapon developed in the first world war that fortunately failed to live up to its terrible potential
 
Tabitha Watson introduces the most aristocratic of acids: Aqua regia
 
The enzyme that helps us turn milk into cheese is also responsible for the biggest commercial success story of any genetically modified organism
 
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Chemistry World Book Club
 
Everything you need to know about everything we don’t yet know. This month’s book is We have no idea by the creators of PHD Comics, Jorge Cham and Daniel Whiteson. It discusses the great unsolved problems of physics in a way which is guaranteed to entertain. We hear from the authors, and the Chemistry World team discuss why the llama is the per ...…
 
One of the most popular plastics of the early 20th century was accidentally invented by a cat, as Kat Arney finds out
 
Despite early setbacks, this conducting crystal shows great promise across a wide range of electronics
 
Caesium chloride is packs a lot of radioactivity into a small volume, making it ideal for treatments where the radioactive material needs to be accurately sited
 
Katrina Kramer speaks with Manchester University researcher David Leigh about compounds that resemble machine parts and could pave the way for molecular robots
 
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Chemistry World Book Club
 
The mass disparagement of knowledge is a recent phenomenon. Apparently we’ve all had enough of experts, and facts aren’t important, as there are always alternatives. In The death of expertise, Tom Nichols considers how facts fell out of favour, and what it means for the future of society. Hear an interview with Tom, a reading from the book and ...…
 
From scabby knees to life-threatening strokes, this important protein is the fundamental link in the complex molecular chain that forms blood clots.
 
When a batch of cinnamon whiskey meant for the American market made its way to Europe, it highlighted starkly different regulations controlling how much propylene glycol is allowed in food and drink
 
If you’ve ever built plastic scale models of aeroplanes or spacecraft, you’ll be familiar with the sharp, sweet smell of butanone
 
Rowena Fletcher-Wood discovers how to stave off stage fright, with a simple compound that revolutionised drug development
 
Michael Freemantle explores the pigments responsible for the rich colours of autumn foliage: ‘the last smiles of the year upon the tawny leaves’.
 
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Chemistry World Book Club
 
Almost a decade after its extinction, the Pyrenean ibex became newly un-extinct thanks to cloning. But what are the limits of this technology? Could we one day visit a real-life Jurassic Park? Bring back the king by Helen Pilcher recounts the progress that has been made in the field of de-extinction and what benefits it may bring. Hear an inter ...…
 
Katrina Krämer examines these extremely versatile materials and speaks to MOF pioneer Omar Yaghi
 
Pyrrolizidine alkaloids from Ragworts and other plants are popular with pollinators but a potent poison to wildlife and livestock, as Mike Freemantle discovers
 
Kit Chapman on the compound that could be the chemical cause of mysterious lights in the night: Phosphines
 
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Chemistry World Book Club
 
We would all love the gift of eternal youth. That remains a dream, but there are things we can actively do to resist the effects of ageing. One proven approach is to protect our telomeres, the short chains of DNA that cap our chromosones. The telomere effect by Elizabeth Blackburn and Elissa Epel tells the story of why telomeres matter and what ...…
 
Kat Arney introduces a two-faced tree sap that can cause nasty rashes or be made into beautiful Japanese furniture
 
Through an early ointment for spots through a medicine for syphilitic Victorians, Michael Freemantle traces the history of highly toxic mercuric chloride
 
The catnip compound that felines go crazy for could have exciting uses for humans, too, as Kat Arney finds out
 
Kiki Sanford explores how polyamines found in semen could be related to a long and healthy life
 
Michael Freemantle on chemical weapons and the birth of cancer chemotherapy
 
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Chemistry in its element
 
Forming layers just three atoms deep, molybdenum disulfide shows potential in filtration, flexible screens and minuscule transistors
 
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Chemistry World Book Club
 
If there’s one thing we can learn from histroy it’s everything that there is to know. Or at least that’s the promise of machine learning. The master algorithm by Pedro Domingos tells us how machines that learn are starting to transform the world, bringing us driverless cars and perhaps even bloodless wars. Hear an interview with Domingos, a rea ...…
 
Kit Chapman explains how a 'daft' pharmacy mix up led to a series of poisonings in Victorian Britain
 
Jane Austen’s Mr Darcy lends his name to a pheromone that lets mice feel the love, as Kat Arney discovers
 
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Chemistry World Book Club
 
Evolution has created ingenious solutions to life’s problems. Some animals use physics in a way that stumps even the physicists. Turtles, for instance, venture thousands of miles across the ocean, yet return with precision to the exact beach from where they hatched. How they do this is still unclear. This is just one of the links between physic ...…
 
Brian Clegg examines the colourful compounds that no red-blooded creature can do without: Porphyrins
 
This month we introduce our new puzzles page, discuss the implications of Trump for science and meet Yuri Oganessian, the only living person with an element named after him
 
Blue flashes and metallic water are just some of the tricks the smallest possible anion has up its sleeve
 
Brian Clegg introduces a crystalline hydrocarbon that isn't as tough as it sounds, but is the basis of a wide range of medicines
 
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Chemistry World Book Club
 
Fat might not be fashionable, but it is essential. It is a living organ that communicates with the brain, controlling our behaviour and even influencing our reproductive cycles. These facts and more form the the subject of The secret life of fat: the science behind the body’s greatest puzzle by Sylvia Tara. Hear an extract from the book, and le ...…
 
On-demand muscle paralysis revolutionised surgery. Katrina Krämer explores one of the key muscle relaxants used in medical procedures: Pancuronium bromide
 
The Seveso accident saw an accidental release of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), commonly known as dioxin. Matt Gunther tells the tragic story.
 
With thoughts turning to our festively-expanded waistlines, Kit Chapman looks at a poster child in the battle against obesity
 
Eugenol, the smell most associated with cloves, may be one of the defining smells of Christmas, but it also leads a double life as fish anaesthetic and insect attractant...
 
Yuval Noah Harari likes the big topics. His last book, Sapiens attempted to explain everything that has happened in the history of humanity. In his latest book he examines everything that will happen in humanity’s future. In part 1 of the podcast, hear the views of the Chemistry World team and those of our special guest, Stephen Cave, executive ...…
 
This week, Neil Withers examines a compound with the 'wrong' number of bonds: Diborane
 
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