Classical music, arts and culture (Updated January 2018; image)
Related podcasts: Music Society Theater Arts Education Travel Wqxr Metropolitan Opera Podcasting Fascinating People Audio Theater Classical Interviews Tech Social Sciences Science Philosophy Storytelling  
public [subscription 492627]
show episodes
 
T
The Radio 3 Documentary
Monthly+
 
Exploring different aspects of history, science, philosophy and the arts.
 
A
Arts and Ideas
Weekly+
 
The best of BBC Radio 3's flagship arts and ideas programme Free Thinking - featuring in-depth interviews and debates with artists, scientists and public figures.
 
T
The Essay
Weekly+
 
Leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond, themed across a week - insight, opinion and intellectual surprise
 
C
Composer of the Week
Monthly+
 
BBC Radio 3's Composer Of The Week is a guide to composers and their music. The podcast is compiled from the week's programmes and published on Friday, it is only available in the UK.
 
T
The Early Music Show
Monthly
 
An exploration of early music, looking at early developments in musical performance and composition both in Britain and abroad
 
S
Sound of Cinema
Monthly+
 
Series of programmes exploring film music
 
M
Music Matters
Rare
 
The stories that matter, the people that matter, the music that matters
 
T
The Verb
Monthly+
 
Radio 3's cabaret of the word, featuring the best poetry, new writing and performance
 
P
Private Passions
Monthly+
 
Guests from all walks of life discuss their musical loves and hates, and talk about the influence music has had on their lives
 
L
Late Junction Sessions
Daily+
 
Unique studio sessions bringing together musicians who have never recorded together before to create spontaneous new hybrid music. From BBC Radio 3.
 
M
My Essential Classics
Weekly
 
Discover classical music loved by celebrated guests from all walks of life. To hear the music in full go to BBC Playlister.
 
B
Between the Ears
Rare
 
Celebrating 20 years of innovative and thought-provoking features that make adventurous use of sound and explore a wide variety of subjects. Made by leading radio producers
 
I
In Tune Highlights
Weekly
 
Highlights from BBC Radio 3’s In Tune - featuring interviews with guests from the world of music and the arts. In Tune is presented by Sean Rafferty and Katie Derham.
 
T
The Choir - The Choral Interview
Monthly
 
Sara Mohr-Pietsch interviews performers about their choral passions. The Choir programme broadcasts every Sunday at 4pm, exploring all things choral, with performances and...
 
T
The Proms Podcast
Monthly
 
Composer and comedian Vikki Stone unbuttons the BBC Proms and asks the questions everyone else is afraid to ask.
 
Loading …
show series
 
P
Private Passions
 
Alistair Spalding talks about dance with the zeal of the convert. Although he's headed Sadler's Wells since 2004, commissioning new work from leading international choreographers - Akram Khan, Mark Morris, Matthew Bourne, Pina Bausch - he doesn't come from a dance background. He left school at sixteen, and worked in a solicitor's office, aiming ...…
 
S
Sound of Cinema
 
Matthew Sweet presents a selection of film music inspired by the theme of power, in particular the abuse of power, prompted by the release of Steven Spielberg's new film 'The Post'. Amongst Matthew's selection is music for 'Caligula'; 'The Last King of Scotland'; 'Paths of Glory'; 'A Few Good Men'; 'Compliance'; 'All The King's Men (2006)'; 'La ...…
 
Presented by Tom Service. Tom Service meets Paul Lewis, one of the UK's leading pianists as he embarks on a landmark series of recitals exploring the music of Haydn, Beethoven and Brahms. They discuss the parallels and connections which exist between these composers' works, and enjoy the beauty, humour, tragedy and serenity found in their writi ...…
 
Ian McMillan and Hollie McNish present the best in new poetry. Joining them this week are Remi Adefesysian, Jenni Fagan, Kerry Andrew and Danez SmithPresenter: Ian McMillanProducer: Cecile Wright.
 
C
Composer of the Week
 
Donald Macleod explores Beethoven the pianist and composer for the piano.
 
A 'man versus machine' collaboration session exploring the relationship between technology and creativity. Can we create a digital version of the ideal Late Junction collaborator using computer code alone? We find out whether a piece of software, with parameters designed specifically for the show, can hold its own improvising alongside one of t ...…
 
Fiona Sampson, Daisy Hay, Christopher Frayling and David H. Guston join Matthew Sweet to discuss Mary Shelley's story in film, fiction and the view of AI scientists now.In Search of Mary Shelley: The Girl Who Wrote Frankenstein by the poet and writer Fiona Sampson is out now.Christopher Frayling has published Frankenstein: The First Two Hundred ...…
 
Leïla Slimani, President Macron's champion of French culture and language, is interviewed by presenter Shahidha Bari about her new role and her novel Lullaby which won the 2016 Prix GoncourtPlus Emile Chabal from the University of Edinburgh discusses Savages: The Wedding by Sabri Louatah - a novel imagining the first Arab candidate for Presiden ...…
 
A car race around Australia is fictionalised in Peter Carey's latest novel. He talks to Rana Mitter about depicting race and racing. Josephine Quinn questions whether the Phoenicians existed as she looks at the way ancient texts and artworks helped construct an identity for the ancient civilization on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, stretch ...…
 
Picks from across the week on In Tune with Sean Rafferty. His guests this week include the world renowned a cappella group The King's Singers, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. Tenor James Gilchrist and pianist Anna Tilbrook reflect on 20 years working together, and Kyra Humphreys celebrates two decades with the Royal Northern Sinfoni ...…
 
Clemency Burton-Hill explores what technological advances offer to artists.
 
T
The Early Music Show
 
Hannah French with music and stories from Les vingt-quatre violons du Roi - an ensemble based at the French court of Versailles but renowned throughout Europe during the 17th Century, with music by Lully, Rebel, Delalande, Boesset, Aubert, Dumanoir and many others.
 
P
Private Passions
 
The physicist and broadcaster Helen Czerski talks to Michael Berkeley about her favourite music, inspired by her Polish heritage and her fascination with technology and exploration. Having gained a wonderfully titled PhD in Experimental and Explosive Physics from Cambridge in 2006, Helen worked in the US and Canada, and is now a Research Fellow ...…
 
S
Sound of Cinema
 
Matthew Sweet takes this week's new release, the acclaimed "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri", which has a new score by Carter Burwell and looks at how this and other film scores present ideas about grief. Among Matthew's selection are the 1939 version of 'Wuthering Heights'; 'A Monster Calls'; 'Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close'; 'M ...…
 
Sara Mohr-Pietsch talks to pianist James Rhodes about his latest book 'Fire on All Sides', a journal in which he candidly discusses the challenges of touring as a performing musician and its impact on mental health, a topic close to him. Also, a new production by the Royal Opera House of Monteverdi's The Return of Ulysses - we visit the site at ...…
 
T
The Essay
 
The poet Fiona Hamilton contrasts the different states of clay before and after it's baked hard. The satisfying tactile quality of clay squished in the hand, compared to the dry ordinariness of a brick. It's part of this week's series of Cornerstones - nature writing about how rock, place and landscapes affect us. Mud bricks are as old as civil ...…
 
On the programme this week, linguist David Crystal is looking at pronunciation - what does is mean to have a 'friendly accent'? Inspired by David's writing is a brand new poem from Mike Garry which plays with 'Approximants' - consonants that sound like vowels and are often seen as being friendly. In 'Spandex and the City' (Orbit), novelist Jenn ...…
 
C
Composer of the Week
 
Donald focuses on five years through Franz Schubert's short life.
 
The artist and archaeologist Rose Ferraby gets to grips with something that is always around us, but which we almost never stop to consider: gypsum, the chief constituent of the plaster on the walls around us. It's part of this week's series of Cornerstones - nature writing about how rock, place and landscape affects us. Gypsum's use dates back ...…
 
Matthew Sweet discusses protests like the 1968 uprising at Columbia University, 1985's Battle of the Beanfield and the acid house movement with guests Paul Hartnoll of Orbital, novelist Tony White, editor Paul Cronin and writer Tessa DeCarlo. The Fountain in the Forest by Tony White is available nowA Time To Stir: Columbia '68 edited by Paul Cr ...…
 
The writer Esther Woolfson contrasts the solidity of Aberdeen, the 'Granite City', with the decline of the North Sea oil and gas industry, on which its economy has so relied since the 1970s. It's part of this week's series of Cornerstones - nature writing about rock, place and landscape. Author of 'Field Notes from a Hidden City', about her enc ...…
 
A
Arts and Ideas
 
Eleanor Rosamund Barraclough explores the uncanny possibilities of the In Between with the neuroscientist Dean Burnett, award-winning poet Vahni Capildeo, artist Alexandra Carr, writer and walker of London and other wastelands, Iain Sinclair, and the philosopher, Emily Thomas. How do our brains and bodies react in the In Between spaces of the a ...…
 
The writer Sara Maitland conjures with a rock of ages, Lewisian gneiss. Two-thirds the age of the earth itself, and the oldest stone in the UK, it makes up parts of the Northwest Highlands and the Western Isles. It's part of this week's series of Cornerstones - nature writing about rock, place and landscape. Sara reflects on how the gneiss bega ...…
 
Amit Chaudhuri, Karen McCarthy Woolf, Daniel Mendelsohn and Emily Wilson join Philip Dodd to explore translating, rewriting and using Homer's epic work to frame a memoir. Emily Wilson has published a new translation of The Odyssey Daniel Mendelsohn has written An Odyssey: A Father, A Son and An Epic Karen McCarthy Woolf wrote Nightshift as part ...…
 
T
The Essay
 
The writer Alan Garner sparks with flint, the stone that, perhaps more than any other, has enabled human civilisation. It's a stone that has featured in some of his novels, such as Red Shift, where the same Neolithic hand axe resurfaces across different times to haunt his characters. And it is time and evolution that he looks at in this essay: ...…
 
Highlights from the week, including Gerald Finley, Mathilde Milwidsky & Gavin Sutherland.
 
Clemency Burton-Hill presents a series exploring the impact of technology on creativity. Across three episodes she traces how technology has shaped the creative process, from conception and execution, to sharing and experiencing. Technology may help us to be more productive, but does it make our ideas better?Artists are both preoccupied with te ...…
 
S
Sound of Cinema
 
Matthew Sweet on the film music of Franz Waxman and in this, the second of two programmes, the focus is on the post war years - a time which gave us some of Waxman's greatest scores from Sunset Boulevard to Taras Bulba. Matthew also looks at Waxman's major contribution to the classical musical life of America through the annual Los Angeles Musi ...…
 
T
The Essay
 
Nikesh Shukla on Watershed in Bristol and how it helped him fall in love with the city. 5/5 Nikesh edits Rife magazine for young people in the building and explains how the spirit of Watershed is summed up in the community who use the space. "People are generous with their time, their ideas and their skills. People can be interrupted and can in ...…
 
The Verb welcomes January's fresh starts and clear-outs with poems on empty drawers and new beginnings. Ron Padgett, Hollie McNish, Laurie Bolger, Lennox Cato and Harry Giles join Ian McMillan.
 
A
Arts and Ideas
 
Diving from Tudor times through the Brooklyn Naval Yard in the Second World War to present day deep water sculpture parks and swimming with whales. Rana Mitter talks to prize-winning writer Jennifer Egan about the Sea as metaphor and how the research for her latest novel, Manhattan Beach, was the inspiration for its time-shifting, punky, award- ...…
 
T
The Essay
 
Travel writer Phoebe Smith on Hafod Eryri - the visitor centre on Mount Snowdon's summit.4/5 Phoebe explains how despite herself, Hafod Eryri has grown on her, and that she has found unexpected joy at being able to drink hot chocolate on top of a mountain. Its presence says something about our chutzpah in putting a building where it doesn't bel ...…
 
When Philip Astley and his trick riders performed in 1768 in a circle not a straight line in a field behind where Waterloo station is now, the idea of the circus ring was born. Matthew Sweet looks at the career of the impresario, his 42 foot diameter ring which is still the big top template and 250 years of circus with historian Vanessa Toulmin ...…
 
T
The Essay
 
Andrew Hurley on the haunting qualities of Chingle Hall, a 17th-century manor house near Preston. 3/5 Andrew describes the disturbing histories of the inhabitants of the hall and the many paranormal experiences of visitors. As repositories of memories and secrets, are buildings themselves sentient things and places of shifting realities?Produce ...…
 
T
The Radio 3 Documentary
 
Eleanor Rosamund Barraclough, lover of all things Nordic, doesn't want to live forever. But she's fascinated by those who do. Especially as she sees our eyes being been drawn Northwards, throughout human history, to think immortal thoughts. From the ancient Greeks to the cryogenics industry, we've sought immortal inspiration in the perpetual No ...…
 
Novelist Melissa Harrison on the joy of 'sleeping with books' at Gladstone's Library in North Wales, the only residential library in the UK.2/5 Melissa explains why the building allows her to sink into a state of uninterrupted concentration allowing a thread of thought to persist not only over hours, but days. Producer Clare Walker.…
 
A
Arts and Ideas
 
Philip Dodd is joined by Roger Scruton, Haroon Mirza, Kevin Davey and Kirsty Gunn to explore writing, modernism and experiment from T. S. Eliot onwards. Roger Scruton's books include 'How to be a Conservative' and 'England: An Elegy'. His most recent is 'Where We Are'. Kevin Davey's novel 'Playing Possum' was shortlisted for the 2017 Goldsmiths ...…
 
T
The Essay
 
Pianist Stephen Hough on Wigmore Hall in London and how its "shoebox" design catches the ear.1/5 Stephen describes the hall in which he has performed and listened to numerous concerts and how its design ensures "every sound is beautifully focused."This week's Essays are celebrating British architecture. Each writer has a passionate connection w ...…
 
P
Private Passions
 
Alfred Brendel is one of the great musicians of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. He's renowned for his masterly interpretations of the works of Haydn, Mozart, Schubert, Brahms, Liszt and Beethoven; in fact he was the first performer to record the complete solo piano works of Beethoven.Alfred Brendel gave his first public recital in Gra ...…
 
Acclaimed Icelandic poet and author Gerður Kristný journeys into the curious world of Iceland's Christmas myths.With not one but thirteen Santa Clauses, troll-like figures who sneak down from the mountains to make mischief at Christmas and a 'Yule Cat' who prowls through the snow looking for lazy people to eat, there are myriad fantastical - an ...…
 
S
Sound of Cinema
 
Matthew Sweet with the first of two programmes marking the 50th anniversary of the death of one of cinema's greatest musical figures from the Hollywood Golden Age - Franz Waxman.In today's programme Matthew focuses on Waxman's pre-War years, from his first work in film in Germany in 1930 for Frederick Hollander on The Blue Lamp and with Fritz L ...…
 
Joining Ian McMillan for a sci-fi themed Christmas party are Carol Ann Duffy, Hollie McNish, Abandoman, Paul Magrs, Katy Manning and Verb New Voice Laura Potts. Recorded in front of a studio audience at Media City.
 
T
The Radio 3 Documentary
 
Amidst the flickering candlelight of Christmas, dispelling the darkness of the season, Fiona Shaw explores the invisible brilliance of stage lighting.
 
As part of the Spirit of Bach season, Dame Emma Kirkby shares some of her memories of singing Bach alongside some of her favourite recordings of other performers, including Christoph Prégardien, Barbara Schlick, Peter Kooi and Hana Blažíková.
 
P
Private Passions
 
Many Private Passions guests over the years have revealed their passion for Bach. But for some, the great composer has really transformed their lives. The great primatologist Jane Goodall, for instance, describes how she reached such a dark time in her life that she considered giving up altogether. Four of her workers had been kidnapped in Afri ...…
 
M
Music Matters
 
Sara Mohr-Pietsch investigates what lies beneath the 'Spirit of Bach', the hidden elements to this well-known and well-loved composer, which are discovered by performing his music, studying his scores and examining the philosophies his music exhibits. In her quest, she interviews one of the world's leading Bach interpreters, pianist Angela Hewi ...…
 
C
Composer of the Week
 
Donald Macleod traces J S Bach's early life from Eisenach through to his first marriage.
 
Sean Rafferty walks around the new Charles II exhibition with curator Rufus Bird. Plus chats with Henning Kraggerud, The City Musick and pianist Alexandra Dariescu.
 
P
Private Passions
 
Jane Birkin came to fame in the swinging 60s, thanks to her wild beauty and daring appearances in avant-garde films such as Blow-up, and thanks also to her tempestuous relationship with Serge Gainsbourg. In 1969 their song "Je t'aime" was banned by the BBC and the rest is history; it became the biggest-selling foreign language record ever. Sinc ...…
 
C
Composer of the Week
 
Donald Macleod explores the rich vein of fairy tale and fantasy in Tchaikovsky's music
 
Speed
Series preference
1x
1x
Volume
100%
/

Google login Twitter login Classic login