Classical music, arts and culture (Updated July 2018; image)   public [subscription 492627]
show episodes
 
Exploring different aspects of history, science, philosophy and the arts.
 
A
Arts and Ideas
Weekly+
 
The best of BBC Radio 3's flagship arts and ideas programme Free Thinking - featuring in-depth interviews and debates with artists, scientists and public figures.
 
T
The Essay
Weekly+
 
Leading writers on arts, history, philosophy, science, religion and beyond, themed across a week - insight, opinion and intellectual surprise
 
BBC Radio 3's Composer Of The Week is a guide to composers and their music. The podcast is compiled from the week's programmes and published on Friday, it is only available in the UK.
 
An exploration of early music, looking at early developments in musical performance and composition both in Britain and abroad
 
S
Sound of Cinema
Monthly+
 
Series of programmes exploring film music
 
T
The Verb
Monthly+
 
Radio 3's cabaret of the word, featuring the best poetry, new writing and performance
 
P
Private Passions
Monthly+
 
Guests from all walks of life discuss their musical loves and hates, and talk about the influence music has had on their lives
 
M
Music Matters
Rare
 
The stories that matter, the people that matter, the music that matters
 
Unique studio sessions bringing together musicians who have never recorded together before to create spontaneous new hybrid music. From BBC Radio 3.
 
Discover classical music loved by celebrated guests from all walks of life. To hear the music in full go to BBC Playlister.
 
B
Between the Ears
Rare
 
Celebrating 20 years of innovative and thought-provoking features that make adventurous use of sound and explore a wide variety of subjects. Made by leading radio producers
 
I
In Tune Highlights
Weekly
 
Highlights from BBC Radio 3’s In Tune - featuring interviews with guests from the world of music and the arts. In Tune is presented by Sean Rafferty and Katie Derham.
 
Sara Mohr-Pietsch interviews performers about their choral passions. The Choir programme broadcasts every Sunday at 4pm, exploring all things choral, with performances and...
 
T
The Proms Podcast
Monthly
 
Composer and comedian Vikki Stone unbuttons the BBC Proms and asks the questions everyone else is afraid to ask.
 
Loading …
show series
 
Liliane Lijn explores the work of postwar French artist Yves Klein, famous for patenting ultramarine blue and jumping from a window in the suburbs of Paris. Leap into the Void!
 
Novelist Ian Sansom fires off a letter to Geoffrey Chaucer...
 
Paco Peña first started playing the guitar at the age of six; it was his older brother's guitar, and since there were nine children in the family, all living in two rooms in a crowded house in Córdoba, he had a ready-made audience right from the beginning. He made his first professional appearance at the age of twelve, and toured through Spain ...…
 
Matthew Sweet considers music for British animation as the BFI mark the 50th anniversary of Yellow Submarine. The programme looks back on scores for some of the classic children's animation titles from the likes of Oliver Postgate and Ivor Wood including 'Bagpuss'; 'Ivor the Engine'; and 'Camberwick Green'; music for Jerry and Sylvia Anderson's ...…
 
A new series of essays by the popular Fiona Stafford, Professor of Literature at Somerville College Oxford, following her much praised three series of essays The Meaning of Trees and two series of The Meaning of Flowers, Fiona explores the symbolism, importance, topicality and surprises of five iconic British beaches all of which are unique and ...…
 
Donald Macleod explores the life and work of British composer Ralph Vaughan Williams
 
A new series of essays by popular Fiona Stafford, Professor of Literature, Somerville College Oxford, following her much praised five series of essays The Meaning of Trees and The Meaning of Flowers. Fiona explores the symbolism, importance, topicality and surprises of 5 iconic British beaches all unique and quintessentially British in differen ...…
 
Why We Need the Novel Now. Man Booker Prize winner Howard Jacobson delivers a keynote lecture and talks to presenter Shahidha Bari and an audience at the Southbank Centre in London as part of the Man Booker 50 Festival. In the age of Twitter and no-platforming, Jacobson argues that the novel has never been more necessary. Howard Jacobson won th ...…
 
Helaine Blumenfeld is a sculptor who divides her time between her family in England and her work-family in Italy. As an exhibition featuring much new work opens in Ely Cathedral, she talks to Anne McElvoy about expressing her thoughts in marble, the importance of risk to the artist and why total immersion without distraction produces her best w ...…
 
A new series of essays by the very popular Fiona Stafford, Professor of Literature at Somerville College Oxford, following her much praised three series of essays The Meaning of Trees and two series of The Meaning of Flowers, Fiona explores the symbolism, importance, topicality and surprises of five iconic British beaches all of which are uniqu ...…
 
At the height of summer, Matthew Sweet and guests turn their minds to tennis, beaches and walking. As Wimbledon continues, Benjamin Markovits and William Skidelsky consider the philosophy of tennis; New Generation Thinker Des Fitzgerald explores the geography of a little known beach in Cardiff city centre; Rachel Holmes goes on a walking tour o ...…
 
A new series of essays by the popular Fiona Stafford, Professor of Literature, Somerville College Oxford, following her much praised five series of essays The Meaning of Trees and The Meaning of Flowers. Fiona explores the symbolism, importance, topicality and surprises of five iconic British beaches, all unique and quintessentially British in ...…
 
Essay One : Dover Beach A new series of essays by the very popular Fiona Stafford, Professor of Literature at Somerville College Oxford, following her much praised three series of essays The Meaning of Trees and two series of The Meaning of Flowers, Fiona explores the symbolism, importance, topicality and surprises of five iconic British beache ...…
 
Chris Bowlby travels with Tony Harrison to Prague, to discover how one of Britain's best known poets was shaped by the cultural energy and tragedy of 1960s Czechoslovakia. Harrison reads from his Prague poems in the locations where they were written. And he relives with Czech friends stories of cafes and cartoons, sex and surveillance and the h ...…
 
The actor Adjoa Andoh talks to Michael Berkeley about her passion for theatre, opera, and the music that reflects both her English and African heritage.Whether you're a regular at the National Theatre or Old Vic, prefer your entertainment on the big screen, or like to curl up on the sofa in front of Dr Who or Casualty (or - even - with the radi ...…
 
Matthew Sweet looks back on film scores composed to convey the wonder and terror of Mary Shelley's great creation in the week of Haifaa al-Mansour's new film biopic of the writer.As well as featuring music by Amelia Warner for the new film, Matthew also offers musical moments from the 1931 James Whale 'Frankenstein'; 'Mary Shelley's Frankenstei ...…
 
Presented by Kate Molleson For the last Music Matters of the season, Kate explores the connections between music and language by revisiting her recent trips through parts of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.Starting in Faversham, on the north Kent coast, the singer and guitarist Chris Wood explains how he weaves the local and ordin ...…
 
The Verb celebrates the NHS at 70, exploring the language of the body, and the way bodies communicate when words fall short. So much care given in hospitals and GPs' surgeries is non-verbal, but how do we talk about and pass on expertise that lacks a lexicon? Ian introduces an NHS tribute poem, a brand new commission for The Verb from nurse Mol ...…
 
Playwright Charlotte Jones, author Laurence Scott, New Generation Thinkers Lisa Mullen and Iain Smith join Matthew Sweet.Charlotte Jones discusses her new play set in a Quaker community during the Napoleonic Wars. Matthew Sweet visits Compton Verney Art Gallery with Lisa Mullen to see the exhibition, 'Marvellous Mechanical Museum' which re-imag ...…
 
Donald Macleod explores the life and work of Italian experimental composer, Luciano Berio
 
The Italian architect and engineer, Renzo Piano, talks to Philip Dodd about his career from the Pompidou in Paris (with Richard Rogers) to the Shard in London and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. 50 years of his work are being marked in an exhibition at London's Royal Academy of Arts from the 15th of September to the 20th of Janu ...…
 
Nandini Das and John Gallagher look at words for strangers in Tudor and Stuart England and ideas about civility. Plus Shahidha Bari talks to Makena Onjerika the winner of the 2018 Caine Prize for African Writing. And, as the NHS approaches its 70th anniversary, we discuss the relationship between care, institutions, and the concept of medicine ...…
 
The patterns and flows of life in the NHS captured in immersive stereo, with specially commissioned music sung by NHS staff and The Bach Choir.In the maternity unit at Birmingham's Heartlands Hospital, the heart rate of an unborn child gives cause for concern. Across town at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, patients with critical heart conditions are ...…
 
Dr Rita Charon explains how Colson Whitehead's 2016 novel about American slavery is used to train medical students, encouraging them to "write what can't be told".This is the final part of The Essay's five-part series, Narrative Medicine - a term coined to describe the capacity to recognize, absorb, metabolize, interpret, and be moved by storie ...…
 
How James Baldwin's short story helped a doctor and her patient break down the divisions of class, age and race. This is part one of The Essay's five-part series, Narrative Medicine - a term coined to describe the capacity to recognize, absorb, metabolize, interpret, and be moved by stories of illness. Simply - it's medicine practised by someon ...…
 
Dr Rita Charon finds a model physician in the pages of Henry James: someone who though on the sidelines of a person's life remains a loyal advocate. This is part two of The Essay's five-part series, Narrative Medicine - a term coined to describe the capacity to recognize, absorb, metabolize, interpret, and be moved by stories of illness. Simply ...…
 
Dr Rita Charon considers Kazuo Ishiguro's novel and the questions that it raises. What it means to be human? And how can physicians respond to life's mysteries and paradoxes? This is part three of The Essay's five-part series, Narrative Medicine - a term coined to describe the capacity to recognize, absorb, metabolize, interpret, and be moved b ...…
 
Dr Rita Charon traces parallels between the portents of war in Virginia Woolf's novel and the responses of her New York City patients to the 9/11 attacks. This is part four of The Essay's five-part series, Narrative Medicine - a term coined to describe the capacity to recognize, absorb, metabolize, interpret, and be moved by stories of illness. ...…
 
Emma Smith on how coverage of gender in the arts might help us understand today's debate
 
A tale of two printers: Estienne Roger in Amsterdam and John Walsh in London. Hannah French discovers how and why they changed the publishing scene and how musical taste spread across Europe as a result.
 
Matthew Sweet looks at music for films that explore father/daughter relationships in the week of the release of Debra Granik's new movie "Leave No Trace".
 
Presented by Tom Service Tom is in Glyndebourne to preview a new production of Debussy's opera Pelleas et Melisande, exploring the opera's themes of dream, reality and our relationship with the past with the director Stefan Herheim and singers Christina Gansch and John Chest.David Toop tells Tom about working with flutes and electronics to rein ...…
 
170 years ago one woman launched the beginning of the modern women's rights movement in America. New Generation Thinker Joanna Cohen of Queen Mary University of London looks back at her story and what lessons it has for politics now. In the small town of Seneca Falls in upstate New York, Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote The Declaration of Sentiment ...…
 
The Verb explores the language and literature inspired by northern rocks - with Benjamin Myers, Bella Hardy, M. John Harrison, Kate Davis and Simon Bainbridge.
 
Alison Bechdel's graphic memoir 'Fun Home' on stage at the Young Vic in London reviewed by Jen Harvie from Queens Mary University of London, a novel inspired by Kathy Acker from Olivia Laing, Film historian and broadcaster Ian Christie on the 40th anniversary of Michael Cimino's film, 'The Deerhunter' and a new biography by Michèle Mendelssohn ...…
 
The lawyer turned poet whose response to political upheaval has lessons for our time - explored by New Generation Thinker Seb Falk with an audience at the York Festival of Ideas The 14th century's most eloquent pessimist, John Gower has forever been overshadowed by his funnier friend Chaucer. Yet his trilingual poetry is truly encyclopedic, mix ...…
 
Can beauty be an ethical ideal? What did being handsome mean in C18 England? How do we look at images by Egon Schiele and Francesca Woodman or a Renaissance nude and is that affected by changing attitudes towards the body now? Anne McElvoy talks to the painter, Chantal Joffe, the philosopher, Heather Widdows, the writer, performer and activist ...…
 
A radical community of women set up in 1760s rural England is explored in an essay from New Generation Thinker Lucy Powell, recorded with an audience at the 2018 York Festival of Ideas.Sarah Scott's first novel, published in 1750, was a conventional French-style romance, the fitting literary expression of a younger daughter of the lesser gentry ...…
 
Rana Mitter discusses food in history. James C Scott on the role of grain and coercion in the development of the first settled societies, and how the Victorians changed lunch, with New Generation Thinkers Elsa Richardson and Chris Kissane. Plus, following the death of American philosopher Stanley Cavell last week, Rana discusses his work and le ...…
 
The most famous imposter of the seventeenth century - Mary Carleton. John Gallagher, of the University of Leeds, argues that the story of the "German Princess" raises questions about what evidence we believe and the currency of shame. Her real name was thought to be Mary Moders and she became a media sensation in Restoration London, after her h ...…
 
Sean Rafferty presents the In Tune Highlights, bringing you a top selection from the best musicians on the show this week.
 
Sophie Coulombeau tells the story of John Trusler, an eccentric Anglican minister who was the quintessential 18th-century entrepreneur. He was a prolific author, an innovative publisher, a would-be inventor, and a 'medical gentleman' of dubious qualifications. Dismissed by many as a conman and scoundrel, today, few have heard of the man but his ...…
 
Might explorations of gender in great art of the past help illuminate today's issues?
 
Robert Hollingworth looks at Orazio Vecchi's madrigal comedy L'Amfiparnaso which was premiered in Modena in in 1594. It's a particular form of musical theatre that flourished briefly in Italy, just before the dawn of opera, combining music and commedia dell'arte, the down-to-earth improvised street comedy of the time.…
 
Kim Moore won the prestigious Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize this year for her first poetry collection, "The Art of Falling", and is still only in her thirties. The judges described her prize-winning collection as "thrilling: language at its most irresistible and essential". But however thrilling, poets need to make a living, and Kim Moore's day ...…
 
You can never see through someone else's eyes, but can we, by stealth, tap into people's visual imaginations?The mind's eye is something most of us take for granted - the 'secret cinema' inside our mind, turning sounds into shapes, characters into faces - it sometimes seems like a sixth sense. For those who have it. Constantly viewing our own p ...…
 
Matthew Sweet with film music movies and teamwork in the week of the launch of Ocean's 8 with a score by Daniel Pemberton.
 
Tom Service talks to conductor Paavo Jarvi ahead of his appearance at this year's Proms with the Estonian Festival Orchestra. Also, environmentally sensitive American composer John Luther Adams and British composer Tansy Davies talking about the relationship between sound and nature in their pieces - all to coincide with the BBC Forest season. ...…
 
Forests are a potent source of inspiration for artists, writers and composers but the truly creative force in the forest is fire. Andrew C Scott from Royal Holloway, University of London is the author of 'Burning Planet'. He stands in awe of the power of fire to reshape our forests and the ability of nature to bounce back, offering fresh space ...…
 
Google login Twitter login Classic login