Best Econoday podcasts we could find (Updated June 2019)
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Econoday’s economists look at the week’s important economic events.
 
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Whether it's the Federal Reserve or the ECB, talk is building that central banks are facing the need to boost policy stimulus. The latest (mostly disappointing) economic numbers out of the US and Europe are discussed.
 
The Federal Reserve has shifted strongly toward future rate cuts, a move based on weakening global growth and global trade that follows Mario Draghi's warning of similar measures for the European Central Bank. The Bank of Japan and the Reserve Bank of Australia are further along their dovish paths and more of the same is the call.…
 
Central banks are cutting rates or appear to be preparing to cut rates. Jeremy Hawkins and Mark Pender discuss the effects of trade wars and also what to look for in coming central bank meetings including personnel developments at the European Central Bank.
 
The shift out of the center and away from the establishment shakes up the outlook for European economic policy and financial assets. The nuts and bolts of coming post-election events in Europe and the UK are also discussed.
 
Our panel discusses what appears to be an approaching rate cut in Australia and the effect the US-China trade breakdown are having in Asia. Weak data out of the US and what this means for Federal Reserve policy are also discussed as are risks to the euro from the pending European Parliament elections.…
 
How will the hikes underway in US-China tariffs affect the world's two largest economies and how is Europe responding? Jeremy Hawkins and Mark Pender also update the latest economic data and key pending data to come.
 
A slew of European data show improvement to what are still, however, modest rates of growth. Data out of the US have been less strong than the headlines would suggest especially regarding the consumer. For global monetary policy, the outlook remains wait-and-see with perhaps a dovish tilt.
 
The US and China may be on the rebound though growth in Europe is uneven and is being held back by German manufacturing. Whether slowing in trade and weakness in manufacturing is being offset by strength in domestic services is a topic of discussion as are risks tied to the coming Spanish election and extended Japanese holiday.…
 
Whether the Federal Reserve or the Bank of India, executive power has been flexing its muscle in an effort to loosen monetary policy. Jeremy Hawkins and Mark Pender also discuss the latest economic numbers especially from the manufacturing sector where revisions have improved the European outlook.
 
Solid snap backs for U.S. employment and European industrial production hint at momentum going into the second quarter and raise the question whether seasonal adjustments are to blame for the fourth-quarter slowdown. The outlook for central bank policies are also discussed and the very latest on Brexit is updated.…
 
The outlook for interest rates in India and whether politics are at play is one of our panel's topics as well as housing in Australia and what trade talks mean for China. Soft data are the theme in the U.S. and what they may or may not mean for Friday's employment report, while Europe is headlined by weak core inflation, contraction for German ...…
 
How much of a risk is mounting red ink in the U.S. and how much good news, amid Brexit uncertainty, may already be priced in the pound? Our panel also discusses central bank responses to the global slowdown.
 
Status quo may be the expectation but surprises and nuances at this week's round of central bank meetings are always possible. And surprises are the norm for Brexit where the latest twists and turns, and what they would mean for the pound, are explored.
 
Whether it's the U.S. employment report or retail sales or European industrial production, large swings are appearing in the monthly reports that are reawakening questions over the reliability of seasonal adjustments during the winter months. Our panel also discusses unfolding events over Brexit and how they already have and may in the future a ...…
 
Global central banks are increasingly taking note of slowdowns including in Europe where industrial production is sinking and the Italian economy in recession. U.S. growth is still solid with demand for labor unusually strong though a second government shutdown and escalating trade actions against China remain major wild cards.…
 
Jeremy Hawkins assesses the latest economic data out of Europe and outlines contagion risks tied to technical recession in Italy, while Mark Pender updates indications on the U.S. outlook and discusses the Federal Reserve's shift to neutral.
 
Our panel discusses the outlook for Asia and whether the Reserve Bank of Australia will indeed stick to its tightening bias, which is a similar question for the FOMC and how dovish they might sound at this week's meeting. For Europe, risks include general slowing especially for Italy and of course Brexit and how the markets and the Bank of Engl ...…
 
Chinese GDP is slowing, European industrial production is at a standstill and the Washington shutdown is holding back the United States. Discussion includes why U.S. indicators are still favorable and what the best indicator is to judge Brexit developments.
 
The Brexit question for the U.K. may or may not be in a late end game as Jeremy Hawkins explores the political issues and economic risks. For the U.S., Mark Pender talks about what economic numbers are still available and what the outlook is for coming employment data and whether they will be affected by the government shutdown.…
 
With Brexit hobbling, Germany slowing and the U.S. government shutting down, the New Year opens with as much uncertainty and investor caution as ever. Jeremy Hawkins and Mark Pender discuss the latest details including which U.S. indicators are affected by the shutdown and which are not.
 
An early signal on what to expect for 2019 will come on the third week of January when the House of Commons votes on Teresa May's Brexit withdraw bill. For the U.S., the first signal for 2019 will come from Wednesday's FOMC forecast and whether the markets can expect fewer rate hikes ahead, or perhaps no hikes at all.…
 
The U.S. employment report for November was on the soft side, setting up what could be a backing off in 2019 rate hikes at next week's FOMC. Also discussed are outlooks for Brexit, European Central Bank policy, and riot-stricken France.
 
A run down of central banks from Canada to India to Europe points to steady monetary policy and following last week's dovish turn from Jerome Powell, fewer rates may now be the call for the Federal Reserve. Our panel also updates Brexit risks, the latest data out of the Eurozone, and a possible upside jolt for Friday's U.S. employment report.…
 
Theresa May appears to be well short of the votes needed in the House of Commons to secure her agreement with the Eurozone, raising questions over her leadership and also whether new amendments or new elections are in store. For the U.S., early indications for fourth-quarter GDP are mixed with net exports continuing to weaken while inventories ...…
 
A Fed tightening may be just a matter of time but sluggish European household demand leaves an ECB rate hike a distant prospect. Little excitement is expected from the week’s RBA and RBNZ announcements but speculation about a Brexit deal should keep investors focussed on UK financial markets, just in case...…
 
US GDP proved strong on the surface in the third quarter but mixed in the details while expectations for Friday's employment report are upbeat though year-on-year wages are expected to jump. In Europe, flash GDP data for the third quarter show growth slowing to a 4-year low with the political shake up in Germany adding further uncertainty.…
 
The Chinese stock market has turned volatile as the nation's economic data have slowed. The US has third-quarter GDP coming out on Friday but the following week's wage data may have more impact on Federal Reserve policy. In Europe, Italy's budget-busting plans are not helping market stability and are proving a negative for the euro.…
 
Pessimism is back in front as Brexit negotiations, still snagged by the Irish border, hit yet another climax this week. For Italy, budget busting plans and possible EU protests are the focus. A budget bust in the US is also playing out and is giving a Keynesian boost to what looks like another strong quarter for GDP.…
 
Another cut in Chinese banks’ reserve requirements shows that the PBoC is more interested in supporting economic growth than it is worried about containing inflation. The new Italian government has no inflation to worry about but it also wants to give its economy a lift, even if it does mean breaking the EU Commission’s fiscal rules. In both ca ...…
 
Rates look to go up at tomorrow's FOMC as attention focuses on the extent of future hikes and risk of recession. In the UK, Brexit developments are becoming more testy and include the chance for a second referendum. While in Italy, fiscal debt is the topic and its implications for policy across the continent.…
 
Initial effects of this year's U.S.-China trade war, whether on trade or the yuan or U.S. Treasuries, are still unfolding and that was before this week's U.S. actions against China. No change is the theme for the European Central Bank and Bank of England as well as the Swiss National Bank where trouble for emerging- market currencies, and resul ...…
 
The European Central Bank is expected to keep its easing bias and the Bank of England it's tightening bias at this week's meetings. In the U.S., a tightening labor market is raising questions over wage inflation while in Japan, earthquakes and typhoons are raising third-quarter risks.
 
US economic data have been slowing slightly but not expectations for Friday's employment report. Australia is enjoying its 27th straight year without recession amid a solid outlook including for non-mining industries. Too solid are the gains underway for the Swiss Franc as increasing turmoil hits the emerging markets.…
 
Overall growth continues to flatten in Europe while flat wages, rising housing costs and failure to modernize are behind a leadership change in Australia. In the U.S., early third-quarter data are mixed though a big jump in the consumer's assessment of the labor market is hinting at a very strong August employment report.…
 
Despite strength in Germany, Eurozone manufacturing is in technical recession while key data out of China, both industrial production and retail sales, are lower than expected. Lower than expected is also the result for U.S. import and export prices as businesses absorb higher costs and as tariff-related effects on metals fade.…
 
The discussion revolves around questions of labour mobility and what it means to matching jobs and skills in a tight market. The Reserve Bank of Australia remains on hold for two years. Germany’s worrisome manufacturing sector. Will the Bank of England increase rates again?
 
The Bank of Japan, to the surprise of some, is keeping its easing efforts at full force while the Federal Reserve is expected to make no policy change in a Wednesday statement, however, that may have a hawkish edge. A move higher for core inflation is good news for the European Central Bank though slowing second-quarter growth isn't, while for ...…
 
Will the Bank of Japan make changes at month end to its aggressive quantitative easing program? The European Central Bank is expected to hold policy steady at this week's meeting but there are still questions over the 2019 outlook . And for the Fed, a retaliatory rate hike to assert its independence at next week's FOMC may be out of the questio ...…
 
Jerome Powell isn't making waves in his semi-annual testimony, while lack of progress in Brexit and lack of variation in Chinese GDP are also topics of interest.
 
Our panel updates building risks in the Brexit drama, the inflow of new workers in the US job market, and the choices the Bank of Canada faces in their coming meeting.
 
Trade worries are beginning to affect export-driven economies in Europe while ongoing effects of import tariffs are boosting U.S. orders, inventories and especially backlogs for steel and aluminum.
 
Tariffs already appear to be an issue for China's central bank while the issue has yet to be a focus for the Federal Reserve. In Europe, central banks have been cautious and may prove more hawkish than accommodative.
 
An end to quantitative easing doesn't mean the European Central Bank is turning hawkish. Also discussed is the Swiss National Bank and its fight to lift inflation and limit currency appreciation as well as the play between weakness and strength in the U.S. housing market.
 
Winding down of stimulus, despite weak Eurozone growth, is a possible outcome for this week's ECB meeting while a rate hike, given scarcity in the U.S. labor market, appears a certainty for the Federal Reserve.
 
U.S. tariffs and retaliatory tariffs are posing new questions for the global outlook with their initial economic impact beginning to unfold. Risks from Italy and from a tightening U.S. labor market are also discussed.
 
Strength without inflation is once again the call for Friday's U.S. employment report while the forecast for Italy, and by direct extension the euro, is rising uncertainty.
 
The Royal Wedding was definitely big and enough to give a boost to UK GDP, while in the US it's manufacturing, not the consumer, that's the economic driver.
 
Consumer spending in the US got off to a decent second-quarter start as did the Chinese industrial sector, in contrast to the UK where weaker growth is raising questions over Bank of England policy.
 
Low growth and low inflation raise new doubts over the end of quantitative easing in Europe and rate hikes in the UK, while in the U.S. the focus is shifting to the risk of higher inflation. We also update the latest on Chinese economic data and trade talks.
 
Slowing growth is the theme in Europe but less so in the U.S. where inflation is making a sudden appearance. For Japan, however, steady is the theme.
 
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