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Exploring Jewish Law public
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Best Exploring Jewish Law podcasts we could find (updated January 2020)
Best Exploring Jewish Law podcasts we could find
Updated January 2020
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Rabbi, Is Pot Kosher? is a podcast exploring the intersection of Jewish traditions and contemporary questions hosted by Rabbi Avram Mlotek and Rabbi Jon Leener.
 
"Central Time" takes a unique approach each hour to cover a mix of topics, finding the latest news, cultural trends, and exploring ideas -- big and small -- to find the best guests to discuss these thought-provoking topics. It can be heard weekdays on the Ideas Network from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.
 
Interviews with Biblical Scholars about their New Books
 
Interviews with Scholars of Intellectual History about their New Books
 
The Rabbinic Journey Podcast is an exploration of my Rabbinate from the inside out. From reflections and sermons to interviews and discussions, I'm going to cover it all. Why? Because there is so much to explore!
 
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For Food Friday, we talk with a chef about how to host a less-fancy but still satisfying dinner party. We also hear from a UW-Madison professor who is one of 14 Brits who have been featured in a documentary series that spans their whole lives. And we look at Gov. Evers' plan to help dairy farmers.
 
We talk to regional reporters about local stories they're covering, including reports of two sexual assault investigations at UW-La Crosse. Then we discuss public art's purpose and look at a controversial sculpture in Appleton. And we catch up on Senate impeachment trial developments.
 
We talk with an author who's been collecting people's stories of loneliness for a book she's working on. Then we talk to the filmmaker behind a new Netflix documentary on the life of Wisconsin's own Betty White. And we catch up on Govenor Tony Evers' State of the State speech from Wednesday night.
 
A historian makes the case that President Donald Trump filled a need America had in national politics. And we catch up on the events of the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump.
 
We learn why it's so difficult to break down chemicals known as PFAS. We also discuss how campaign finance has changed in the decade since the Supreme Court Citizens United decision. And we talk about a franchise restaurant owner who violated child labor laws, including at 40 Wisconsin restaurants.
 
We hear the story of a man who was wrongly convicted, exonerated and decided to become a lawyer in Wisconsin. Then we check in with a political scientist on the latest developments in the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump.
 
We talk with a legal expert about the significance and context of Virginia passing the Equal Rights Amendment. We also weigh the pros and cons of organic farming on a lesser scale. And we look at why the Wisconsin Justice Department is reviewing the National Guard's sexual assault investigations.
 
A Wisconsin researcher explains how she uses audio to study rainforest health. Then we talk about the implications of a new U.S. Postmaster General and what privatization could mean for the mail service. And we catch up on the first day of the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump.
 
An author on the Civil Rights Movement joins us to discuss how Martin Luther King, Jr's critique of "polite" racism by white liberals still resonates. Then we look at a package of youth vaping bills Governor Evers proposed. And we talk with a Wisconsin magician who directs New York's Houdini museum.
 
A program at a Wisconsin prison is giving incarcerated moms a chance to spend time with their children. We find out how it works. We also hear about a new list celebrating the best books by African American women. Plus, the story of a diary from Auschwitz being exhibited in Milwaukee.
 
Maria Dimova-Cookson's new book Rethinking Positive and Negative Liberty (Routledge, 2019) offers an analysis of the distinction between positive and negative freedom building on the work of Constant, Green and Berlin. The author proposes a new reading of this distinction for the twenty-first century. The author defends the idea that freedom is a d…
 
A popular YouTube chef joins us for Food Friday to talk about Korean cooking and culture. We also talk to a professor about how a new virtual reality course played out. And we discuss the Government Accountability Office report that says the White House broke the law when it withheld aid to Ukraine last summer.…
 
We check in with regional reporters on stories they're covering, including a new natural gas plant in Superior. Then we preview this weekend's celebration of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Madison. And we discuss the U.S. House passage of a bill this week that addresses age discrimination.
 
Daniel Kennefick talks about resistance to relativity theory in the early twentieth century and the huge challenges that faced British astronomers who wanted to test the theory during the solar eclipse of 1919. Kennefick is an associate professor of physics at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. He’s the author of No Shadow of Doubt: The 1919…
 
We have an extended conversation with a researcher who's documented people with serious mental illness who enter a cycle of incarceration and homelessness. And we learn about the results of a new poll that included questions about how President Trump has handled tensions with Iran.
 
We break down what's in, and what's missing, from the first part of a new trade deal with China. Then we speak with a state lawmaker about his new bill that would increase accessibility for wheelchair technology. And we discuss the president's authority to take war-like actions.
 
What does cow care in India have to offer modern Western discourse animal ethics? Why are cows treated with such reverence in the Indian context? Join us as we speak to Kenneth R. Valpey about his new book Cow Care in Hindu Animal Ethics (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019). Valpey discusses his methodological odyssey looking at ancient Hindu scriptural acco…
 
We get an inside look at hospital life from an emergency room physician. Then we learn about the history of ice harvesting in Wisconsin. And our weekly roundup of Washington news includes the House vote on sending articles of impeachment to the Senate side of Capitol Hill.
 
Donald Trump came to Wisconsin for a rally Tuesday night in Milwaukee -- we look back at how it went. Then we talk to members from Wisconsin wheelchair soccer teams who are set to play each other this weekend in a tournament. And we learn about new research on the impact of compassionate parenting.
 
Eileen Hunt Botting is Professor of Political Science at Notre Dame and co-editor with Sandrine Berges and Alan Coffee of the anthology The Wollstonecraftian Mind (Routledge, 2019). The collection presents thirty-nine essays from distinguished scholars in philosophy, religion, literature, intellectual history, and other fields who consider the work…
 
Imagination is one of the most important elements of being human, but is most often assumed we know what it is, while rarely being analyzed. Here with me today is Jonathan Erickson to discuss his recent book Imagination in the Western Psyche: From Ancient Greece to Modern Neuroscience (Routledge, 2019). The book looks at various theories of imagina…
 
Global trade agreements can seem abstract, but we discuss how daily use products can help us understand the markets better. Then we learn why a conservative group is apprehending churchgoers' data from cell phones while they worship. And we look at a new report on student loan debt in Wisconsin.
 
An automotive reporter gives us a run-down on new, non-electric vehicles still generating a buzz for this latest model year, including a re-designed Ford Bronco SUV. Then we discuss the latest developments as the impeachment of President Trump heads towards a trial in the Senate.
 
What is the Torah of the Oscar Movies 2019? by Rabbi Avram Mlotek & Rabbi Jon LeenerBy Rabbi Avram Mlotek & Rabbi Jon Leener
 
In his new book, How “Indians” Think: Colonial Indigenous Intellectuals and the Question of Critical Race Theory (University of Arizona Press, 2019), Dr. Gonzalo Lamana carefully investigates the writings of Indigenous intellectuals of the Andean region during Spanish colonialism. By delving into and reinterpreting the work of Guaman Poma de Ayala …
 
Descendants of a prominent slaveholding family, Elizabeth, Grace, and Katharine Lumpkin grew up in a culture of white supremacy. But while Elizabeth remained a lifelong believer, her younger sisters chose vastly different lives. Seeking their fortunes in the North, Grace and Katharine reinvented themselves as radical thinkers whose literary works a…
 
Trade disputes with China and other countries challenged US manufacturers, but lobbyists cashed in. We find out how. And we get the latest on an increasingly politicized case of purging thousands of Wisconsin voters from the rolls. Plus, a look at what's behind a drop in lung cancer deaths.
 
Almost every county in Wisconsin now reports nesting bald eagles. We talk with an expert about the eagle's comeback in the state. We also break down two reports on drinking water quality in Wisconsin. Plus, we'll talk about Iran's statement accepting blame for shooting down a passenger airliner.
 
Black Freethinkers: A History of African American Secularism (Northwestern University Press, 2019) by Christopher Cameron, an Associate Professor of history at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, is a precise and nuanced history of African American secularism from the early nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century. This text is writ…
 
Faith language permeates the letters of Paul. Yet, its exact meaning is not always clear. Many today, reflecting centuries of interpretation, consider belief in Jesus to be a passive act. In his new book Paul and the Language of Faith (Eerdmans, 2020), Nijay Gupta challenges common assumptions in the interpretation of Paul and calls for a reexamina…
 
“The imagination of man’s heart is evil from his youth” – Genesis 8:21 “The evil that men do lives after them, the good is oft interred with their bones.” - William Shakespeare We share with other animals the experiences of violence; of pain, fear and loss, but human beings are the only species that reflects on those experiences and names their sou…
 
Many centuries before the emergence of the scientific consensus on climate change, people began to imagine the existence of a global environment: a natural system capable of changing humans and of being changed by them. In After the Flood: Imagining the Global Environment in Early Modern Europe (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019), Lydia Barnett …
 
In 1665, Sabbetai Zevi, a self-proclaimed Messiah with a mass following throughout the Ottoman Empire and Europe, announced that the redemption of the world was at hand. As Jews everywhere rejected the traditional laws of Judaism in favor of new norms established by Sabbetai Zevi, and abandoned reason for the ecstasy of messianic enthusiasm, one ma…
 
In The Afterlife of Reproductive Slavery: Biocapitalism and Black Feminism’s Philosophy of History (Duke University Press, 2019), University of Washington Professor of English Alys Eve Weinbaum investigates the continuing resonances of Atlantic slavery in the cultures and politics of human reproduction that characterize contemporary biocapitalism. …
 
How did Muslims respond to foreign goods in an age characterized by global exchange and European imperial expansion? What sort of legal reasoning did scholars apply in order to appropriate – or reject – items like the synthetic toothbrush, toilet paper, gramophones, photographs, railway lines, banknotes, hats, and other commodities? What role did l…
 
Latin America – especially colonial Latin America – is not particularly known for futurism. For popular audiences, the region’s history likely evokes images of book burning, the Inquisition, and other symbols of orthodoxy and fatalism. Specialists too tend to associate Latin America with a deep sense of historicism: the weight of memory – conquest,…
 
Barbara Spackman’s riveting study identifies a strand of what it calls “Accidental Orientalism” in narratives by Italians who found themselves in Ottoman Egypt and Anatolia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Relocated, or “de-toured” by historical accident, these travelers wrote about their experiences in Italian, English, and French. Cross…
 
In the late 1500s, the mines of Potosí –a mountain in southern Bolivia — produced 60% of the world’s silver. It was a place of great wealth and terrible suffering. It is also a place, Jorge Canizares-Esguerra argues, that challenges the very idea of the Scientific Revolution. Canizares-Esguerra discusses Potosí and how its peoples and technologies …
 
In Second Slayings: The Binding of Isaac and the Formation of Jewish Cultural Memory (Gorgias Press, 2019), David N. Gottlieb explores the decisive - and, until now, under-appreciated - influence exerted on Jewish memory by the Akedah, the Binding of Isaac narrative in the Book of Genesis. Through the lenses of hermeneutics, literary and social the…
 
Many major political questions today revolve around questions of human nature; what sort of people we are and what sort of people we're capable of being constitute both the goals and limits of the sort of society we can and ought to try and create. Jason Read's The Politics of Transindividuality (Haymarket Books, 2017) looks at a number of figures …
 
Professor Paul Robinson's new book, Russian Conservatism (Cornell University Press, 2019) is a comprehensive examination of the roots and development of the hardy strain of conservative political thought in Russian history. Robinson begins by tackling the thorny question of how to define conservatism in the Russian context and introduces readers to…
 
Brandon R. Byrd is the author of The Black Republic: African Americans and the Fate of Haiti, published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2019. The Black Republic examines the multitude of responses by African American leaders towards Haiti following the Civil War and going into the 20th Century. Byrd’s work provides keen insight the ways …
 
In Aristotle on the Matter of Form: A Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (Edinburgh University Press, 2019), Adriel M. Trott argues for understanding the relationship of matter and form in Aristotle’s work on the model of a Möbius strip. With the figure of the Möbius strip, we can identify two planes at any particular point, but, taking in the figu…
 
How should we understand the appearances of the king in Book V of the Hebrew Psalter? Ever since Gerald H. Wilson’s landmark work, The Editing of the Hebrew Psalter (1985), some have interpreted the failure of the Davidic covenant in Psalm 89 as signaling its replacement by a hope in the direct intervention of the LORD—that is, without any further …
 
For nearly two decades the renowned legal historian G. Edward White has been writing a multi-volume history of law in America. In his third and concluding volume, Law in American History, Volume III: 1930-2000 (Oxford UP, 2019), he surveys the many developments in American law from the middle of the 20th century to the case of Bush v. Gore. One of …
 
It is no easy task to survey and present a comprehensive history of philosophy of an entire intellectual tradition to a broad public audience without compromising on the scholarly rigor demanded by that history’s nuances. In an ambitious endeavor to do precisely that with the Islamic tradition, Peter Adamson masterfully shows how it can be done. Hi…
 
Amy Aronson is an Associate Professor of Journalism and Media Studies at Fordham University and former editor at Working Woman and Ms. magazines. Her biography Chrystal Eastman: A Revolutionary Life (Oxford University Press, 2019) gives us the life of a women’s rights activist, labor lawyer, radical pacifist, writer and co-founder of what became th…
 
In 1798, members of the United Irishmen were massacred by the British amid the crumbling walls of a half-built town near Waterford in Ireland. Many of the Irish were republicans inspired by the French Revolution, and the site of their demise was known as Genevan Barracks. The Barracks were the remnants of an experimental community called New Geneva…
 
Joshua Simon’s The Ideology of the Creole Revolution: Imperialism and Independence in American and Latin American Political Thought published by Cambridge University Press in 2017, compares the political thought of three Creole revolutionary leaders: Alexander Hamilton, Simón Bolívar and Lucas Alamán. By doing so, Simon brings together the intellec…
 
In Greek mythology Prometheus is the trickster Titan who gives fire to humanity. As Wilson Jeremiah Moses explains in his book Thomas Jefferson: A Modern Prometheus (Cambridge University Press, 2019) America’s third president demonstrated many of the same traits as this legendary figure over the course of his long life of intellectual activity. As …
 
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