10 Minutes In New Testament Greek public
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I got an email this week from a listener in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. His name is Jonathan, and we had an email thread about Colossians 1:16 and the meaning of the word κτίζω. It occurs twice in Colossians 1:16, and 15 times in the New Testament, so it is not a word we will come […]By 10 Minutes in New Testament Greek
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In this episode, we look at the 5 conditional statements of 1 John 1:6-10 and see that they are mitigated exhortations. We discuss why John would use mitigated exhortations rather than regular exhortations (or commands) like he does in 2:17ff. 1 John 1:6-10 6 Ἐάν εἴπωμεν ὅτι κοινωνίαν ἔχομεν μετ’ αὐτοῦ καί ἐν τῷ σκότει […]…
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Someone asked why we should study NT Greek. A lot of people chimed in with answers. I thought I would give you a few reasons why I think it’s important. Color vs. Black and White. Moving from a translation into the original is like going from black & white to color. Everything is richer and […]By 10 Minutes in New Testament Greek
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In 1 John 1:2, there is a word that appears twice. In the New American Standard, that word is translated as manifested. However, I really, really wanted to translate it as revealed. But that would be confusing since revealed translates another Greek word. That led me to discover what the difference between the two words is. […]…
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John speaks to the new mood in America that says, “True truth does not exist.” 1 Ὃ ἦν ἀπ’ ἀρχῆς, ὃ ἀκηκόαμεν, ὃ ἑωράκαμεν τοῖς ὀφθαλμοῖς ἡμῶν, ὃἐθεασάμεθα καί αἱ χεῖρες ἡμῶν ἐψηλάφησαν, περί τοῦ Λόγου τῆς ζωῆς,— What was from the beginning, what we have heard, what we have seen with our eyes, […]By 10 Minutes in New Testament Greek
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Anyone who has ever taken New Testament Greek can tell you that participles are hard. They are difficult to parse, and just as difficult to understand how they function in a sentence. The truth is that the participle in Greek functions as a sort of “catch-all.” It does a little bit of everything. In this […]…
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Part 2 of my interview with Dr. Mark Meyer who leads the Ph.D. in Biblical Studies program at Capital Seminary & Graduate School. We discuss the importance of biblical languages in ministry. UPDATE 10/24/2017. It turns out that Dr. Meyer misunderstood a question. I have added a portion at 38:50 to ensure his views are […]…
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Part 1 of my interview with Dr. Mark Meyer who leads the Ph.D. in Biblical Studies program at Capital Seminary & Graduate School. We discuss the importance of biblical languages in ministry. What do you think? Let me know at http://10minutesinnewtestamentgreek.com/017 Find more episodes at http://10minutesinnewtestamentgreek.com.…
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John 3:5 verse is a minefield for Protestants. On the one hand, it can be used to justify the idea that baptism is necessary for salvation (Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodox). On the other hand, it can be used to justify a second baptism of the Holy Spirit (Pentecostals and some Charismatics). How should we understand […]…
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In this episode, we will consider that the two words for love in John 21 are probably synonyms without a real difference, and what that means for interpreting the “Do you love me?” passage. The Greek in this episode is very straightforward. CORRECTION: I mention Episode 12 in the podcast when I should have said […]…
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In this episode, we look at the controversy surrounding the APEST interpretation of Ephesians 4:11, and whether or not the Greek supports such an interpretation. We will also look closely at Granville Sharp’s Rule and how it might or might not apply. Καὶ αὐτός ἔδωκεν τούς μέν ἀποστόλους, τούς δέ προφήτας, τούς δέ εὐαγγελιστάς, τούς […]…
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In this episode, we will finish out mini-series on predicate nominatives and consider their impact on the the original audience of the Gospel of John and I John. 3 Issues involved with PN constructions: The grammar issue: determining which noun is the S and which is the PN. The semantic issue: determining the relationship between […]…
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This is part 1 of a 2-part mini-series. Definition: The predicate nominative (PN) is approximately the same as the subject (S) and is joined by an equative verb, whether stated or implied. The two nouns are not always completely identical; you cannot immediately say that if A=B then B=A. Rather, the PN typically describes a larger […]…
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ὁ δέ Ἰησοῦς ἔλεγεν· πάτερ, ἄφες αὐτοῖς, οὐ γάρ οἴδασιν τί ποιοῦσιν. 1st Year Greek: Translate aorist as a single act: “He said.” Translate imperfect as a continuing act: “He was saying.” Intermediate Greek: Aorist: a “wide-angle” view of the action. A panoramic camera shot. As the audience, you have stepped back away from the […]…
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ἀμήν λέγω ὑμῖν, ὅπου ἐάν κηρυχθῇ τό εὐαγγέλιον τοῦτο ἐν ὅλῳ τῷ κόσμῳ, λαληθήσεται καί ὃ ἐποίησεν αὕτη εἰς μνημόσυνον αὐτῆς. (Matthew 26:13, NA28). “Truly I say to you, wherever this gospel is preached in the whole world, what this woman has done shall also be spoken of in memory of her“(Matt. 26:13, NASB). Subjective […]…
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(4) Ἀνέβη δέ καί Ἰωσήφ ἀπό τῆς Γαλιλαίας ἐκ πόλεως Ναζαρέθ εἰς τήν Ἰουδαίαν εἰς πόλιν Δαυίδ ἥτις καλεῖται Βηθλέεμ, διά τό εἶναι αὐτόν ἐξ οἴκου καί πατριᾶς Δαυίδ, (5) ἀπογράψασθαι σύν Μαριάμ τῇ ἐμνηστευμένῃ αὐτῷ, οὔσῃ ἐγκύῳ. (Luke. 2:4-5) (4) And so Joseph went up from Galilee, from the city of Nazareth, to Judea, […]…
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Καί γυνή οὖσα ἐν ῥύσει αἵματος δώδεκα ἔτη καί πολλά παθοῦσα ὑπό πολλῶν ἰατρῶν καί δαπανήσασα τά παρ᾽ αὐτῆς πάντα καί μηδέν ὠφεληθεῖσα ἀλλά μᾶλλον εἰς τό χεῖρον ἐλθοῦσα, ἀκούσασα περί τοῦ Ἰησοῦ, ἐλθοῦσα ἐν τῷ ὄχλῳ ὄπισθεν ἥψατο τοῦ ἱματίου αὐτοῦ· (Mk. 5:25-27, 7 participles underlined, the main verb in bold type) . And a woman was […]…
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Matthew 1:19 Ἰωσήφ δή ὁ ἀνήρ αὐτῆς, δίκαιος ὢν καί μή θέλων αὐτήν δειγματίσαι, ἐβουλήθη λάθρᾳ ἀπολῦσαι αὐτήν. Two causitive participles: δίκαιος ὢν (being righteous) and μὴ θέλων (not wanting). Causative participle: the cause or reason or ground by which an action is accomplished The causal participle answers the question Why? The thought of the pa…
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2 Corinthians 10:11-13 11. τοῦτο λογιζέσθω ὁ τοιοῦτος, ὅτι οἷοί ἐσμεν τῷ λόγῳ δι᾽ ἐπιστολῶν ἀπόντες, τοιοῦτοι καὶ παρόντες τῷ ἔργῳ. Let such a person consider this, that what we are in word by letters when absent, such persons we are also in deed when present 12. Οὐ γὰρ τολμῶμεν ἐγκρῖναι ἢ συγκρῖναι ἑαυτούς τισιν […]…
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πορευθέντες οὖν μαθητεύσατε πάντα τά ἔθνη, βαπτίζοντες αὐτούς εἰς τό ὄνομα τοῦ πατρός καί τοῦ υἱοῦ καὶ τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος (Matthew 18:19[note]Greek Bible text from: Novum Testamentum Graece, 28th revised edition, Edited by Barbara Aland and others, © 2012 Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, Stuttgart.[/note]) Therefore, go and make disciples of all nation…
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Does Matthew 28:19 really command us to “Go”? Missionaries have long thought so, but others have pointed out that the word go is not a command at all; it is an aorist participle. Since a participle is not a command by definition and should be translated as “Having been sent.” In this episode, we will […]…
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