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For history lovers who listen to podcasts, History Unplugged is the most comprehensive show of its kind. It's the only show that dedicates episodes to both interviewing experts and answering questions from its audience. First, it features a call-in show where you can ask our resident historian (Scott Rank, PhD) absolutely anything (What was it like to be a Turkish sultan with four wives and twelve concubines? If you were sent back in time, how would you kill Hitler?). Second, it features lon ...
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My Dark Path

MF Thomas, Creator & Host

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My Dark Path explores the fringes of history, science, and the paranormal. In every episode, creator and host MF Thomas illuminates a topic taken from the dark corners of our world. Combining his personal, on-location research with insights from experts, researchers and historians, every episode will intrigue, excite, and perhaps, send a shiver down your spine. Visit www.mydarkpath.com for more information.
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The Alien Probe is a podcast about aliens, UFOs and the Supernatural. A weekly podcast dedicated to discussing UFOs, the paranormal, and just plain weird. Hosted by Doug Anthony and featuring co hosts and fans of just about anything unusual.
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Perfect Womanhood

Emily Magers & Krisi Harris

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There have been many books over the years labeled as a manual for women. Everything is covered from medical advice to how to be the perfect wife and how to raise the kiddos. We’re going back in time to cover these ridiculous books, manuals, and magazines. Come laugh with us about how fucking crazy our ancestors were. Weekly episodes begin Friday, October 14th. EXPLICIT WARNING: Some episodes cover subjects such as sex, drugs, and suicide. Listen at your own discretion.
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The Shattered Podcast

Lesser of 2 Weevils

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In the early 1900s, the great and good at the Paris Opera buried an urn full of “living voices”—Gramophone recordings of famous opera stars—to be disinterred after a century. When those urns were opened, mysterious recordings were discovered. Who made them? And why?
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PodCastingNet

David C. Robinson

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British and American railway news and articles from the late 1800's and early 1900's, as reported in Railway Magazine and other publications and narrated by Dr. David Robinson
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Surrounded by History

Jessica Potter and Jeff Lang

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Blue Earth County Historical Society presents Surrounded by History, a podcast in partnership with KTOE AM 1420 & 98.7 FM in Mankato, Minnesota. Every episode we learn about the people, the events, and more that helped create Blue Earth County, in the heart of southern Minnesota. Surrounded by History, a new way to learn about the history that surrounds us every day.
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Tiny Matters

The American Chemical Society

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From molecules to microbes, Tiny Matters is a science podcast about the little things that have a big impact on our world. Every other Wednesday, join hosts and former scientists Sam Jones and Deboki Chakravarti as they answer questions like, 'what is a memory?', 'is sugar actually addictive?' and 'are we alone in the universe?'
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Blood and Oil

Lauren Kenny & Travers of South by Northeast Prod

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Blood and Oil is the New Orleans history podcast that starts after the tourist booklets end. Join hosts Lauren Whitley-Haney & Kenny Haney as they detail the story of industry & violence in 1900s South Louisiana plantation country.
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The Encounters A Paranormal Experience is a Paranormal / Supernatural discussion between Amanda and Dakota. We seek to unravel the unexplained and unknown. Join us weekly as we step into the shadows to bring a little light on the unknown. Welcome to the discussion.
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The Lives of Women in History is a podcast about the fascinating and inspiring stories of women from colonial days to the early 1900s. These women settled new lands, traveled the ocean, drove covered wagons, built cities and communities, were cattle rustlers and bank robbers, educators and politicians, stood up against racism and fought for the right to vote, got married and raised families, and so much more. Hosted, researched, and written by April Rogers. I believe that every woman's story ...
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Welcome to the whisky legends podcast, where I’ll be speaking to one legend in particular, my Grandad Tim Morrison, whose been working in whisky for over 60 years helping to develop the industry, following his Grandad in the early 1900s. Throughout this series we hear about how things have evolved from someone with unique first-hand experience, from cleaning the Kiln and malting Barley in the 60s, buying Islay’s Bowmore distillery and pioneering the Single malt whisky category with his broth ...
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In this Podcast areas the figure out some background knowledge about the history of rap and some of the main people who are a part of it this series includes interviews of people who are in the rap community and segments that include unknown facts about artists, dates that their career began, and others.
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The London Necropolis Railway is an original, full cast audio drama podcast that premiered in fall 2018. The story takes place in London’s underground system where an organisation called The London Necropolis Railway moves the souls of the dead out of London to avoid the city getting overrun with hauntings. Barney works at the LNR, he’s one of the ghouls whose job it is to ensure that the souls end up on the trains that take them to the hereafter. He is bored with his job and tired of his en ...
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Midnight. A lonely courtyard. The dead body of a stranger—a prosperous looking, well dressed, elderly man is found in Middle Temple Lane, London. This is one of England's ancient Inns of Court where barristers were traditionally apprenticed and carried on their work. Middle Temple is just a few minutes walk away from busy Fleet Street and the Thames Embankment. In the dead man's pocket is a piece of paper with the name and address of a young barrister. One of the first people to reach the cr ...
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Hello Stop Mo!

Animation Wild Card

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An educational limited podcast series to empower you with introductory knowledge of the stop motion industry to help reduce barriers of entry for newcomers as well as demystify how to navigate this career. And it's all guided by the contagious passion of the creator-hosts, Alexis Deprey and Casey Follen.
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The influence of the ancient Greek philosopher Socrates has been profound. Even today, over two thousand years after his death, he remains one of the most renowned humans to have ever lived—and his death remains one of the greatest unsolved mysteries. There is another side to this story: impiety, lack of reverence for the gods, was a religious crim…
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In 1937, Paul W. Ivey released a second edition of his book, Salesmanship Applied. Chapter 6 is one of my favorites from my collection of books from 75+ years ago. Want to be the best version of you? Instead of recreating the wheel on these ideas, let’s turn the clock back 87 years. We spend so much time on sales methodologies and techniques to be …
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At the beginning of the 1900s, New York City was in turmoil. Prohibition loomed, outbreaks of typhoid and an influenza pandemic had people on edge, and the city was steeped in corruption. One of the many consequences of that corruption was a completely inept coroners office. Instead of having trained medical examiners work out the causes of sudden …
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A millennium ago, North American cities rivaled urban centers around the world in size. So, when Europeans arrived in the sixteenth century, they encountered societies they did not understand, having developed differently from their own, and whose power they often underestimated. And no civilization came to a halt when a few wandering explorers arr…
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Craig Hogan co-founder and President of non-profit Afterlife Research and Education institute joins Doug to discuss how your loved ones are alive and fine in the next life and waiting patiently for you to finish your time on Earth and ascend to Summerland on the next dimensional plane.By Doug Anthony
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War, Conflict, Victory & Defeat. These are all aspects of life that some may have to face. This was true for the various groups of the Sioux Tribes. On today's bonus episode from "Key Battles of American History" join host James Early as he discusses the multiple wars that took place between 1862-1890, collectively known as "The Sioux Wars"…
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Are we alone in the universe? Brazil's Billings Reservoir holds a story so chilling, it might just answer that question. We'll plunge into the enigmatic waters to reveal a chilling tale that transcends the ordinary bounds of reality. We'll spotlight a harrowing 1988 case where the inexplicable mutilation of a local man sparks a firestorm of questio…
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In an obscure village in western Massachusetts, there lies what once was the most revered but now totally forgotten relic from the history of early New England—the massive, tomahawk-scarred door that came to symbolize the notorious Deerfield Massacre. This impregnable barricade—known to early Americans as “The Old Indian Door”—constructed from doub…
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In mid-nineteenth century New England, Robert Armstrong was a young man with the world at his feet. His family was wealthy and gave him the opportunity to attend the nation’s first dental school. But Armstrong threw his future away, drinking himself into oblivion. Devoured by guilt and shame, in December 1849 he sold his dental instruments, his wat…
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Fiorello LaGuardia was one of the twentieth century’s most colorful politicians―a 5’2’’ ball of energy who led New York as major during the Depression and World War Two, charming the media during press conference and fighting the dirty machine politics of the city. He was also quintessentially American: the son of Italian immigrants, who rose in so…
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Sales - the most brilliant minds in the profession view our responsibility as "selling ideas'. Those brilliant minds date back to the 1600s and Sir Francis Bacon, the late 1700s and Benjamin Franklin, and many more throughout the 1900s. In today's episode, we'll explore the advice from Bacon, Franklin, and a couple of amazing thought leaders on sel…
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On July 25th, 1978, in the northwest of England, a baby was born. On its surface, that’s not a big statement — babies are born every single day. But this birth attracted media attention from around the world. The baby’s name was Louise Brown, and she was the first baby born from in vitro fertilization, or IVF. In this episode of Tiny Matters, Sam a…
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The Allied Intervention into the Russian Civil War remains one of the most ambitious yet least talked about military ventures of the 20th century. Coinciding with the end of the first World War, some 180,000 troops from several countries including the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Japan, Italy, Greece, Poland, and Romania, among others…
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On todays episode, our hosts explore a variety hour of extraterrestrial encouters from the mid-century portion of the 1900s. We will explore 4 seperate stories from lights in the sky to full blown invasions, UFOs have captured the attention of humanity. Come join us for a jolly romp thru time that will leave you placing an ever more watchful eye on…
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Deb joins Doug as they discuss the 1955 book "Flying Saucers Have Landed" Chapter 9 "Saucers in Sanskrit" weapons of mass destruction and Chapter 10 "Saucers for a Song" Flying Saucers exhibiting strange melodic sounds and the sound like a swarm of bees flying overhead, along with the history of these sounds as they apply to Saucer sightings.…
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At the turn of the nineteenth century, two waves of revolutions swept the Atlantic world, disrupting the social order and ushering in a new democratic-republican experiment whose effects rippled across continents and centuries. The first wave of revolutions in the late 1700s (which included the much-celebrated American and French Revolutions and th…
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Commander John Lamade started the war in 1941 a nervous pilot of an antiquated biplane. Just over three years later he was in the cockpit of a cutting-edge Hellcat about to lead a strike force of 80 aircraft through the turbulent skies above the South China Sea. His target: Hong Kong. As a storm of antiaircraft fire darkened the sky, watching from …
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Tiny Matters listeners are THE BEST and we want to bring you more of what you like! Head to bit.ly/tinypodsurvey to give us feedback and help us make Tiny Matters even better. The survey should take no more than 5-10 minutes to fill out. Your motivation? Filling out the survey will enter you into a Tiny Matters mug raffle! Thank you in advance
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The name of Al Kite's murderer - Robert Cooper - is not in doubt. But Cooper's real identity and his motivations remain a mystery 20 years later. In this episode, I delve into the chilling and mysterious Al Kite case, a true-crime saga that has baffled investigators and captured the public's attention. Al Kite, a kind-hearted and well-respected ind…
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On January 30, 1918, a young man “with the appearance of a well-educated, debonair foreigner” arrived at the U.S. customs station in Nogales, Arizona, located on the border with Mexico. After politely informing the customs inspector that he had come to complete his draft registration questionnaire and meet a friend in San Francisco, he was approved…
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Our version of sales recruiting, sales training, dedicated territories, quotas, salary + variable compensation plans, even sales kickoffs all began between 1890-1920. The process designs, compensation strategies, and almost all of the selling methodologies are based on this foundational approach - which, for the most part, I’d argue has been correc…
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This week, Sam and Deboki are joined by Trace Dominguez and Julian Huguet, the hosts of That’s Absurd Please Elaborate, a podcast where they do serious research to answer silly questions like, "What if the world had more sheep than people?" and "What would happen if you filled a volcano with concrete?" In this episode of Tiny Matters, Trace and Jul…
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The last months of World War II on the Eastern Front saw a ferocious fight between two very different air forces. Soviet Air Force (VVS) Commander-in-Chief Alexander Novikov assembled 7,500 aircraft in three powerful air armies to support the final assault on Berlin. The Luftwaffe employed some of its most advanced weapons including the Me 262 jet …
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Korey Zooms in to join Doug to discuss the All Domain Anomaly Resolution Office (The worst in a long line of government UFO reporting agency acronyms) findings of reported UFO (UAP), Extraterrestrials and private company reverse engineering projects from 1945 to October 2023.By Doug Anthony
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Have you ever wondered if there was a group to reach North America before Christopher Columbus? Find out more in today's bonus episode from another Parthenon podcast "History of North America." Join host Mark Vinet as he discusses the search for the first non-indigenous explorers to reach the North American continent prior to Christopher Columbus’ …
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The Iliad is the world’s greatest epic poem—heroic battle and divine fate set against the Trojan War. Its beauty and profound bleakness are intensely moving, but great questions remain: Where, how, and when was it composed and why does it endure? To explore these questions is today’s guest, Robin Lane Fox, a scholar and teacher of Homer for over 40…
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On July 9, 1860, a violent mob swept through the Christian quarters of Damascus. For eight days, violence raged, leaving 5,000 Christians dead, thousands of shops looted, and churches, houses, and monasteries razed. The sudden and ferocious outbreak shocked the world, leaving Syrian Christians vulnerable and fearing renewed violence. Rogan is today…
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Silk—prized for its lightness, luminosity, and beauty—is also one of the strongest biological materials ever known. More than a century ago, it was used to make the first bulletproof vest, and yet science has barely even begun to tap its potential. As the technologies it has inspired—from sutures to pharmaceuticals, replacement body parts to hologr…
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Salesman's "Creeds" - There was a concept that started popping up around 1905, spreading to individual companies, industries, and eventually to entire cities by the 1910s. Established to change the perception of the sales profession. these "creeds" defined a core set of beliefs every salesperson should have in taking goods to market. In this episod…
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North Korean sci-fi literature and cinema carry unique themes and messages that could only have originated in the Hermit Kingdom. This episode delves into how North Korea imagines a future of scientific and technological supremacy, often portraying the United States as the antagonist. It examines the historical context of North Korean science ficti…
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Although we look very different from many of the other creatures on this planet, we’re more connected than you might think. Our evolutionary history means we share many of the same genes and physiology, and that’s not just cool to think about — it’s useful. Because it means that, to learn about the things we lack or wish we could do better, we can …
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Nobody blossomed late in life like Frank Lloyd Wright. He was written off as a has-been by middle age after a promising start. Between 1909 and 1929, Wright’s career was marked by personal turmoil and a roller coaster of career-related ups and downs. In these years, before he completed the buildings, we know him for today, Wright’s career was so fa…
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Frederick Rutland was an accomplished aviator, British WWI war hero, and real-life James Bond. He was the first pilot to take off and land a plane on a ship, a decorated warrior for his feats of bravery and rescue, was trusted by the admirals of the Royal Navy, had a succession of aeronautical inventions, and designed the first modern aircraft carr…
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Piracy didn’t spring into existence in the 18th century Caribbean. It has existed as long as there has been commercial shipping and people to steal the goods. There were medieval pirates. Vikings loved robbing ships in the Baltic and North Seas. The Romans dealt with pirates in the Mediterranean, and the Greeks and Carthaginians before them. Pirate…
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Between 1940 and 1943, Polish diplomats based in Bern, Switzerland, engaged in a remarkable – and until now, almost completely untold – humanitarian operation. This operation was one of the largest actions to aid Jews of the entire war and far eclipsed the better-known efforts of Oskar Schindler. In concert with two Jewish activists, these diplomat…
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It's happening again! A Tiny Matters Q&A and mug giveaway! Sam and Deboki answer listener questions about science, like, ‘Is it true that when we think of a memory we are actually remembering the last time we thought of the memory?,’ ‘Why do differently colored cats have such differing personalities,’ and ‘What is quantum entanglement?,’ plus quest…
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The Clotilda was the last slave ship to land on American soil, docked in Mobile Bay, Alabama, in July 1860—more than half a century after the passage of a federal law banning the importation of slaves, and nine months before the beginning of the Civil War. Five of its passengers, ranging in age from two to nineteen when kidnapped, died between 1922…
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As the popular narrative goes, the Civil War was won when courageous Yankees triumphed over the South. But an aspect of the war that has remained little-known for 160 years is the Alabamian Union soldiers who played a decisive role in the Civil War, only to be scrubbed from the history books. One such group was the First Alabama Calvary, formed in …
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Veterans of World War 2 are called the Greatest Generation for their uncommon courage and self-determination. Whether this descriptor is true or part of America’s self-mythologizing during the 20th century is a challenging question, one that Andrew Biggio, a veteran of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, worked to answer. Biggio found that many were …
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