show episodes
 
Welcome to the Lattice podcast, the official podcast for 3DHEALS. This is where you will find fun but in-depth conversations (by founder Jenny Chen) with technological game-changers, creative minds, entrepreneurs, rule breakers, and more focusing on how we can use 3D technologies, like 3D printing and bioprinting to reinvent healthcare and even life sciences. This podcast will also include AMA (Ask Me Anything) sessions, past Instagram Live interviews, and other direct engagements with our T ...
 
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show series
 
In this Episode of 3dhealsLive, we spoke about the unique journey for Dr. Zille on how he was a hobbyist CAD designer for cars (since 17 years old) to a CMF surgeon. What was the first clinical case that inspired him to dig deeper into using 3D printing for CMF and implants? What advice does he have for clinicians and newcomers who want to venture …
 
Today in 2005, an 11 year old pitcher in upstate New York, Katie Brownell, brought her A-game to the Little League field. She not only pitched a perfect game, she struck out all 18 batters she faced! Plus: Houston's famous Art Car Parade is back this weekend. Meet Katie Brownell, the girl who once struck out 18 batters in a perfect Little League ga…
 
Way out there beyond the edge of the solar system, Voyager 1 is measuring the density of the stuff out there. And because that stuff is vibrating, it comes out as sound. In other words, there are sounds in interstellar space and we have now recorded them. Plus: a look at a very chill hobby some bartenders have taken up in Japan. In the emptiness of…
 
UCLA did the research: at least 65 different animal species apart from humans exhibit vocal play sounds that are similar to laughter. So what kind of jokes should we be telling them? Plus: how an acclaimed 1972 movie might have been lost forever, if the man hunting for the original copy had shown up a week later. Animals laugh too, UCLA analysis su…
 
Today in 1875, aviation pioneer Harriet Quimby was born. She isn't as well known as Amelia Earhart or Bessie Coleman but, as the first woman to fly across the English Channel, she definitely made an impact. Plus: on Minnesota's birthday, a look at a fact you might not know about its famous state fair. Harriet Quimby (National Aviation Hall of Fame)…
 
It's the day in 1899 that dancing, acting and singing legend Fred Astaire was born. He's best known for his iconic dancing with Ginger Rogers, but before that, he danced on stages all over the world with his sister, Adele - and she was the one who got most of the attention. Plus: a music rental company teams up with a metal drummer to create a drum…
 
It was this week in 1965 that Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards got up in his sleep, started up a portable tape recorder, and recorded a guitar riff and an opening line that would soon be iconic: "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction." Here's more of how the song came together. Plus: if this year has left you stressed out, there's a new game that mi…
 
A research team at the University of Rochester and the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands has found a way to bioprint a strong, flexible and eco-friendly material that could one day serve as fabric for t-shirts, energy storage for space missions and much more. Plus: there's a world record for longest golf drive into a moving car... y…
 
There's apparently a group now fundraising for restoring Notre Dame Cathedral by asking people to "adopt" their favorite gargoyles. So maybe it's a good time to figure out why those big scary stone figures are outside cathedrals in the first place. Plus: Cinco de Mayo is here, and some of the many ways we celebrate are more traditional than others.…
 
Fifteen people just took part in the Deep Time project, where they lived in a cave in France as far away from time as we can get. And some interesting things happened. Plus: scientists in Brazil have just spotted a pumpkin toadlet, a tiny orange amphibian that glows green under ultraviolet light. 15 People Lived 40 Days in a Sunless Cave Without Cl…
 
Two new construction projects bring the ancient art of using soil and other materials on a building site to create a new house, in these cases with the help of 3d printers. Plus: Scan the World is an online museum that has 3D scans of thousands of great artworks. This is the first house to be 3D printed from raw earth (It's Nice That) This 3D Print…
 
Today is the day in 1926 that Route 66 got its name. The interstate highway may not be the only one of its kind, but it's certainly the one with the most memorable roadside attractions - including the giant fiberglass sculptures known as Muffler Men and Uniroyal Gals. Plus: there’s a sculpture contest this weekend at Baltimore’s American Visionary …
 
Wearables are big right now, and while they're increasingly useful, they're also limited by the batteries they require. A new effort out of Japan has developed a way to power devices through a chemical found in human perspiration. Plus: Airo is a self-driving concept car that is not only all-electric, it has a built in filter to clean the air it dr…
 
Today in 2019 a runner in the London Marathon set a world record, though it wasn’t recognized as such right away. Here's the story of Jessica Anderson, who was looking to break the world record for fastest marathon run in a nurse’s uniform. Plus: NoseID lets people scan their dogs' one-of-a-kind nose prints into their system, and if the dogs get aw…
 
It's the birthday of Ulysses S. Grant, hero of the Civil War and the only sitting president to have been arrested. Here's the story of how Grant was out speeding through Washington DC and ended up in trouble with the law. It's also the birthday of telegraph pioneer Samuel Morse, so we'll have the story of one of the cleverest uses of Morse Code in …
 
It's National Pretzel Day, so of course we're going to take a deep dive into the history of this near-perfect snack. Plus: if you're hungry for pretzels, we'll tell you about a pretzel-themed restaurant in Maryland. The Religious History of Pretzels (Food and Wine) History of Pretzels (The Spruce Eats) The Pretzel: A Twisted History (History.com) T…
 
This week we're replaying some of our favorite shows about our favorite games. In this episode from September 2020, a research project builds a handheld device modeled on Nintendo's Game Boy that gets its power from solar panels and the energy created by pushing buttons - no batteries necessary. Plus: a programmer recreates the classic video game D…
 
I had a lot of fun speaking to Matteo Zanfabro (Instagram account: 3dvet.printing and playvet3d) because of many good reasons. Not only we both love what 3D printing can do for healthcare but also share a passion for medical imaging, although our clients are very different. In this episode, we talked a little about his early journey into using 3D p…
 
This week we're replaying some of our favorite shows about our favorite games. In this episode from July 2020, we look at how, in the 1980s, gamers without the Internet (such as it was) had to buy or borrow their games. But a few could download programs off the radio. Plus: the arrival of a comet that made some great viewing. If you missed it, you'…
 
This week we're replaying some of our favorite shows about our favorite games. In this episode from June 2020, the FDA approves a video game-based treatment for ADHD. Plus: a school librarian in western Virginia finds a clever way to get books to her students while schools and libraries are closed. Children with ADHD can now be prescribed a video g…
 
This week we're replaying some of our favorite shows about our favorite games. In this episode from May 2019, we pay tribute to Ralph Baer, who invented home video games from his workshop in Manchester, New Hampshire. The city has honored its gaming pioneer with a "Baer Square," complete with a statue, in a city park. Plus: a place called the Marit…
 
This week we're replaying some of our favorite shows about our favorite games. In this episode from December 2019, we look at the history of Oregon Trail, the invention of three student teachers from Minnesota who ended up changing video game history without realizing it. Plus: a hospital in San Antonio, Texas marks the holiday season by sending al…
 
In this episode of Instagram Live recording, I had the pleasure to interview two young startup co-founders, Adam Hecht and Alex Tholl from @divedesignco (website: DiveDesign Studio) who created a niche for themselves in the space of 3D printed prosthesis for animals and athletes. Important topics covered in this interview (in both video and podcast…
 
As automakers move toward all-electric vehicles, we're going to need a lot more batteries, only there are difficulties in getting some of the key elements. A startup called Nth cycle may have a way to help. Plus: meet a young reader who really knows how to multitask. This new tech mines old batteries to find critical ingredients for electric vehicl…
 
On any given day McDonald's serves huge numbers of people, either in restaurants or via drive-thru windows. But once, in the 1990s, the company also tried to operate restaurant cars on a long-distance German train line. Plus: since April 15 is traditionally tax day, so did you know that ancient Rome once taxed bachelors? The McTrain: The Rise and F…
 
One of the more than 700 survivors of the sinking of RMS Titanic was Violet Jessop, a stewardess who helped passengers get into lifeboats and wait for rescue. Amazingly, Jessop had been in one shipwreck before that, and would go on to be in another. Plus: today marks 100 years since the death of the man who patented the Ouija board. His tombstone p…
 
It's National Scrabble Day, marking the birth of the person who started it all. Here's some of how Alfred Mosher Butts and, later, James Brunot turned the game originally called Lexiko got its start. Plus: on this day in 1818, the U.S. begins adding stars (but no longer adding stripes) for each new state. A Short History of Scrabble (and Some Fun S…
 
Today is the birthday of Evelyn Berezin, whose inventions include the first computer-based word processor, the first computerized airline reservations system, and so much more that so many of us use regularly today. Plus: artist Nadia Gonegaï has made the Portrait Urn, a pretty special way to remember someone special. The woman who invented the wor…
 
Two design students have come up with an idea to turn the stretchy, plasticky parts of chewing gum into new wheels for skateboards, so the gum isn't wasted. It's the kind of idea that just might stick. Plus: today in 1965, the Houston Astrodome opened. They had a plan to grow grass indoors, but they also had a Plan B. These Students Designed A Way …
 
Next month the website Yahoo Answers is shutting down, after 16 glorious years of... everything that went on over there. We look back at the most famous moments on a site that became, as the New York Times put it this week, a “haven for the confused.” Plus: a company is making a pair of sneakers that was produced in part from grapes. Yahoo Answers,…
 
On this day in 1948, Idaho Fish and Game moved beavers to a new habitat in a very unusual way: they had the beavers parachute into the wilderness! We'll explain how they did it. Plus: a new map of New York City's most notable trees helps people find some unique green space even in the big city. Parachuting Beavers Into Idaho's Wilderness? Yes, It R…
 
Chuck Lamb found a unique way into TV shows and movies: he became "Dead Body Guy," playing a range of characters who had already passed on. And, of course, he took an unusual path to get there. Plus: it's the birthday of Billy Dee Williams, so here's a few lesser-known facts about the actor who brought Lando Calrissian to life. Why 'Dead Body Guy' …
 
A device in Denmark, WasteShark, has been roaming through water to scoop up floating debris. Now it's going to have a flying companion drone to help spot waste and maybe even clean up oil spills. Plus: photographer Nancy Floyd has been taking self-portraits and other images, structured the same way, day after day since 1982, to show the passage of …
 
Today in 1827, Joseph Dixon began manufacturing pencils at his factory in Salem, Massachusetts, so it's a good day to go back through the centuries and centuries that helped make the pencil what it is now. Plus: there's a vintage and specialty pencil shop in Wisconsin called the Pencillarium! The Write Stuff: How The Humble Pencil Conquered The Wor…
 
As sea levels rise, small island nations like Kiribati face some tough choices. A European design studio has an idea that might help: sustainable buildings that can collect rainwater, generate electricity, and help grow food. And they float. Plus: Boston's Museum of Science joins with Leonard Nimoy's family to mark his 90th birthday in a fascinatin…
 
In this episode of Instagram Live recording, I invited Dr. Daniel Vegh, a young faculty member and prosthodontist from Semmelweis University to share with us his journey of learning about 3D printing for dentistry, his recent accomplishments in the space, and his vision for its future. Dr. Vegh is the author behind @3d_printing_dentistry on Instagr…
 
Today in 1889, the Eiffel Tower was dedicated and opened, but it was only one of hundreds of ideas for what should be built there. And some of the other proposed designs were wild. Plus: a new device would be able to extract water from the air wherever the user already is. The Story Behind The Eiffel Tower's Forgotten Competitors (Ozy) The Eiffel T…
 
Babies born ahead of schedule can benefit from close contact with parents and caregivers - and for the times they're not available, there's a new hospital bed called Calmer that can simulate the rocking motion they feel when they're being held up close. Plus: anybody need a fancy door that can fold down into a ping pong table? Cause that exists now…
 
On this day in 1849, Henry Brown escaped slavery from a Virginia plantation in a very unusual way: he arranged it so he could hide in a small wooden box that was sent to Pennsylvania. Here's some of his story. Plus: it was on this day in 2011 that a paramedic rescued a doctor from a fiery car crash, 30 years after that same doctor had helped the pa…
 
It has been almost nine months since we interviewed Mike Graffeo, CEO, and co-founder of Fluidform, a 3D printing startup out of Carnegie Mellon University focusing on key applications using Freeform Reversible Embedding of Suspended Hydrogels (FRESH) technology. If the average lifetime of a typical startup is five years, the one-year time of a sta…
 
Today in 1804, the US Senate held a party featuring something called the “Mammoth Loaf.” To explain, we have to first tell you about Thomas Jefferson, an enormous block of cheese and an archeology project. Plus: a very cold town in Siberia has some very cool music, thanks to spring ice drums. Jefferson presented with a “mammoth loaf” of bread (Hist…
 
It's a state holiday today known as Maryland Day, so it's a good time to talk about how in 1962 Maryland named jousting its official state sport. Plus: in New York City there's a "space clearer" who removes the negative energy from homes that won't sell and apartments with unsettling or tragic histories. A look into Maryland’s curious state sport: …
 
MRS Bulletin’s Impact editor Markus Buehler interviews Huajian Gao of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore and Bo Ni of Brown University on their development of a deep learning method to predict the elastic modulus field based on strain data that may be the result of an experiment. The method is highly efficient and offers real-time solution…
 
An engineer and beekeeper in New England has developed a system using radar and vibrational sensors to detect when a hive is being robbed by a rival colony, or when some of the bees are about to leave and start their own colony. That should create a buzz among beekepers! Plus: IKEA has just published a digital "scrapsbook" intended to help people t…
 
It was on this day in 1857 that the first commercial elevator began operating at a department store in New York City. And once elevators took off, they started shaping the world around us in some pretty big ways. Plus: a city in Oregon is home to an elevator that is technically a street! March 23, 1857: Mr. Otis Gives You a Lift (Wired) Oregon City…
 
In northeast Georgia, there are giant stone slabs inscribed with ten rules to lead the world toward "an Age of Reason." But the reason for the rules - and who had them installed there - remain a secret. Plus: a new exhibition features works by acclaimed artist Jackson Pollock and his brother and fellow painter Charles Pollock, the first time their …
 
It's our 500th episode! We're celebrating with a visit to the Compass Festival in Leeds, which will feature an art installation that will ring many of the community's pay phones at exactly the same time. Plus: did you know the first race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway wasn't a road race? This is why every phone box in Leeds will ring in unison on t…
 
In Scotland's Shetland Islands, on the island called Unst, a 7 year old's request for a new bus stop led to a community tradition of making the space comfortable and colorful. Plus: a museum in South Bend, Indiana is showcasing cars of the 1970s, a time when cars were cars - sometimes a car was multiple cars. Waiting in Style (Futility Closet) Webs…
 
A big problem in food waste is that people often refuse to buy fruits or veggies because of how they look. But a new study finds that grocers can sell misshapen or odd-looking produce if they market them as "ugly." Plus: if you're weary of remote meetings, a new web tool called Zoom Escaper may help you get a break. Why calling food 'ugly' makes us…
 
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