show episodes
 
Green Dreamer explores our paths to collective healing, biocultural revitalization, and true abundance and wellness *for all*. Curious to unravel the dominant narratives that stunt our imaginations and called to spark radical dreaming of what could be, we share conversations with an ever-expanding range of thought leaders — each inspiring us to deepen and broaden our awareness in their own ways. Together, let's learn what it takes to thrive — in every sense of the word.
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The great tragedy of climate finance is that those who understand it most have their noses to the grindstone, while those who understand it least have their mouths to the megaphone. Bionic Planet aims to end information asymmetry and fix the public discourse by mainstreaming the REAL debates over Natural Climate (and Biodvesi) Solutions.
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The Anthropocene is the current geological age, in which human activity has profoundly shaped the planet and its biodiversity. On The Anthropocene Reviewed, #1 New York Times bestselling author John Green (The Fault in Our Stars, Turtles All the Way Down) reviews different facets of the human-centered planet on a five-star scale. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with A ...
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Since 1968, the quarterly journal Telos has served as the definitive international forum for discussions of political, social, and cultural change. Readers from around the globe turn to Telos to engage with the sharpest minds in politics, philosophy, and critical theory, and to discover emerging theoretical analyses of the pivotal issues of the day. Don't miss a single issue—subscribe to Telos today at the Telos Press website, www.telospress.com.
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stopGOstop is a podcast that explores the idea that sound recordings can act as sediment — an accumulation of recorded cultural material — distributed via rss feed, and listened to on headphones. Each episode is a new sonic layer, incorporating field recordings, plunderphonics, and electroacoustic sound, all composed together in one episode or, alternately, presented individually as striations. The podcast has evolved over its existence, started as a field recording podcast in 2012 the first ...
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Art of Interference

The AoI Collaboratory

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Art of Interference explores creative responses to climate change. We feature artists whose images, sounds, and performances encourage us to retune the relations of nature and technology, the human and the non-human. We ask climate scientists about their research and how it chimes with the interventions of contemporary artists. Additionally, we speak to activists, cultural critics, and policymakers about the need to develop a new ethics appropriate to our twenty-first century of planetary cr ...
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For The Wild Podcast is an anthology of the Anthropocene; focused on land-based protection, co-liberation and intersectional storytelling rooted in a paradigm shift away from human supremacy, endless growth and consumerism.
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The Anthropocene Reviewed, Reviewed is a podcast about the podcast The Anthropocene Reviewed, in which #1 New York Times bestselling author John Green (The Fault in Our Stars, Turtles All the Way Down) reviews different facets of the human-centered planet on an extremely biased five-star scale.
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Into the Anthropocene

Art Gallery of Ontario

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Did you know that humans have now changed the earth more than all other natural forces combined? What the heck is the Anthropocene? How does it affect you and your life? In this series, we answer those questions as we journey across this planet and dig into some of the most urgent issues of our time. This is our world as you’ve never thought of it before. Hosted by Sarain Fox. New episodes are released on Tuesdays. This podcast was produced to go along with the exhibition Anthropocene, featu ...
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Political Heat is here to make sense of climate politics. We know the science tells us to phase out fossil fuels. But it’s politics that will determine how we do that, whose voices matter in decision-making, who will benefit - and who might lose out. Host Amy Mount brings two decades’ experience of environmental politics, policy and organising. She interviews a different guest each episode. You’ll hear from seasoned Westminster operators, savvy campaigners, business representatives, opinion ...
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A is for Anthropocene: Living in the Age of Humanity is a bi-weekly podcast that digs into the multitude of questions about human impact on our planet. Host Sloan MacRae and Steve Tonsor interview experts in science and the arts to tackle tough issues like climate change and species decline without giving up hope that we can still leave the Earth in excellent condition for generations to come.
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Soilent Green

Alyssa Hanofee and Levi Johnson

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This podcast will be exploring how the rising generations are working to meet the challenges of the current Anthropocene era. We will be interviewing researchers, entrepreneurs, students, and other free-thinkers who are turning their passions into smart solutions. This podcast is hosted by students in Colorado State University's Soil and Crop Sciences department. If you're enjoying this podcast, please leave us a review! We are happy to bring free education to everyone, but creating this con ...
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The Overpopulation Podcast is produced by Population Balance and features enlightening conversations between Population Balance executive director Nandita Bajaj, researcher Alan Ware, and expert guests to discuss this often misunderstood subject. We cover a broad variety of topics that explore the impacts of our expanding human footprint on human rights, animal protection, and environmental sustainability, as well as individual and collective solutions.
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In Common

The In Common Team

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In Common explores the connections between humans, their environment and each other through stories told by scholars and practitioners. In-depth interviews and methods webinars explore interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary work on commons governance, conservation and development, social-ecological resilience, and sustainability.
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How do we learn to negotiate a world of growing complexity and uncertainty? Perpetual Novelty is a six-episode set of conversations from Perry Chen, artist and the founder of Kickstarter. A long-time critic of the attention economy, Chen served on the Knight Commission on Trust, Media, and Democracy from 2017-18 to examine and make recommendations in response to the collapse in trust in U.S. democratic institutions, media, journalism, and the information ecosystem. In 2018, he was honored wi ...
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FVRL ReadRadio Podcast

Fraser Valley Regional Library

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Are you looking for something good to read? Or watch? Or listen to? Tune in to Fraser Valley Regional Library’s ReadRadio podcast for some great recommendations. In each episode we will highlight some of the library’s books, movies and TV shows that you might not know about. All reviewed materials are available for loan in the FVRL catalogue. Fraser Valley Regional Library is the largest public library system in British Columbia, with 25 community libraries serving nearly 680,000 people in i ...
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PUAN podcast features ideas and thoughts about issues that concern the public. Conversations are brief and entail translation of complex social idea or theory into intelligible language. It is hosted by Dr. Antonio De Lauri, Research Professor at Chr. Michelsen Institute (CMI), Norway and Saumya Pandey, doctoral researcher at CMI.
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The Schumacher Lectures

The Schumacher Center for a New Economics

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The 1st Annual E. F. Schumacher Lectures of October 1981 emphasized the importance of vibrant regional economies at a time when the focus of the nation was on an expanding global economy. Much has happened since then. The promise of the global economy has faded in face of ever greater wealth disparity and environmental degradation. There is growing interest in building a new economy that is just and recognizes planetary limits. The speakers of the Schumacher Lecture Series continue to be at ...
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The case for conserving nature and its biodiversity needs to be robust and credible. Sometimes that requires a willingness to re-examine conventional wisdom. Monthly episodes of The Case for Conservation Podcast feature introspective conversations with fascinating experts - from ecologists to economists, young professionals to Nobel laureates, journalists to media personalities.
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In Material Matters, host Grant Gibson talks to a designer, maker, artist, architect, engineer, or scientist about a material or technique with which they’re intrinsically linked and discovers how it changed their lives and careers. Follow us on Instagram @materialmatters.design and our website www.materialmatters.design The Material Matters fair will run from 18-21 September 2024 at Bargehouse, Oxo Tower Wharf, as part of the London Design Festival. Material Matters is produced and publishe ...
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Can photography save us from ourselves? Leading photographers consider the power of the photograph to explore the urgent environmental and social issues facing humanity today. From the Prix Pictet, the leading global photography prize on sustainability.
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Lectures from Staffordshire University's Philosophy team from our module Posthumanism and Technology. In this lecture, I begin our course on philosophical posthumanism. I compare and contrast two very different philosophers on the question concerning technology: Martin Heidegger and Rosi Braidotti
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Carbon Valley

Wyoming Public Media

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Following the race to develop an unlikely climate solution. Leaders in Wyoming have a plan to revive coal: jumpstart a young, controversial technology called carbon capture. To plant the seed, the state is hosting an international competition pitting five start-ups against each other for a grand prize. Can they figure out how to future-proof coal—or is this just false hope for the town that powered America?
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What do intellectual historians currently investigate? And why is this relevant for us today? These are some of the questions our podcast series, led by graduate students at the University of Cambridge, seeks to explore. It aims to introduce intellectual historians and their work to everyone with an interest in history and politics. Do join in on our conversations! (The theme song of "Interventions | The Intellectual History Podcast" was created at jukedeck.com)
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In This Climate

In This Climate

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We’re a podcast from Indiana University’s Environmental Resilience Institute and The Media School. We’re here to bring you the scientists working toward solutions, the legislation to watch and the ways you can remain resilient.
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Today Trev welcomes new presenter Betty Melon to the Freedom of Species team. Betty shares her reluctant journey to veganism and her history of animal advocacy. We introduce the meaning of the Anthropocene, a geologic time period defined by human activity and we discuss the implications of national borders and militarisation on wildlife and nature.…
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UConn golf coach Dave Pezzino has been on campus for 17 seasons and has led the elevation of the program to the national scene. He joins us on the latest version of the UConn 360 podcast to talk about that climb and what it is like to be part of the overall Husky culture. Coach Pezzino also gives us some insight on his experience playing alongside …
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In this episode, we chat with Zoe Weil, co-founder and president of the Institute for Humane Education, about her pioneering work in the area of comprehensive humane education, an approach to teaching that draws the intimate links between human rights, animal protection, and environmental sustainability. We take a dive into Zoe's latest book The So…
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What does it mean to remember ourselves as representatives of our rivers, oceans, and other earthly bodies of water? Why is it vital to recognize the failed logic underpinning regulatory systems that take on an “innocent until proven guilty” approach to water pollution? And how can we leverage our tools as artists, storytellers, and creatives to co…
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After a curious coincidence in 1924, the world's weirdest paperweight was revealed to be the fossilized remains of one of our earliest ancestors. To learn more about today's topic, check out: Lee R. Berger, & Ronald J. Clarke. (1996). The load of the Taung child. Nature, 379(6568), 778-779. Berger, L.R., Clarke, R.J., 1995. Eagle involvement of the…
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In today’s show Betty and Trev talk about the accidental wildlife reserve that has emerged inside the Korean Demilitarized Zone. We talk about the history leading up to Korea’s national division and the story of a bird that connected a separated family by flying over the border. We finish with the story of some unexpected WWII heroes from the Tiwi …
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“I am working very hard, although this morning... I was terrified to see that there was no fog, not even a wisp of mist: I was prostrate, and could see all my paintings done for, but gradually the fires were lit and the smoke and haze came back.” When Monet wrote this in a letter to his wife in 1900, the term “smog” had not yet been coined. But the…
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Agriculture has been by far the biggest driver of land change and land degradation worldwide. And yet, it is also fundamental to the very existence of humankind. This mismatch often comes up in public discourse. Over the past year or two, for example, several European countries have seen extensive farmer protests - against rising costs and restrict…
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In today’s podcast, Mieke tells us about Christina Baker Kline’s The Exiles. This powerful, emotionally resonant novel captures the hardship, oppression and hope of four women’s lives — three English convicts and an orphaned Aboriginal girl — in nineteenth-century Australia.Find this title in the FVRL collection: https://fvrl.bibliocommons.com/v2/r…
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This episoed of Bionic Planet is technically an episode of Andrew Greely’s podcast, Smarter Markets, where I appeared as a guest to discuss my new vertical "The Tribes of the Climate Realm." It’s not a series but a vertical, where episodes will drop intermittently over the remainder of the year and probably for years to come. If you're sharing or r…
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What role do protests play in climate activism? How have tactics changed over time? And when is controversy constructive? Amy talks with Hannah Martin, Co Executive Director at Green New Deal Rising, which is a movement of young people fighting to stop climate change. Produced and presented by Amy Mount. Edited by Sarah Eldridge. For more insights,…
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Gabriel Noah Brahm, director of the Telos-Paul Piccone Institute’s Israel Initiative, speaks with Gadi Taub, a Senior Lecturer at the Federmann School of Public Policy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Taub previously joined us for the TPPI webinar on “Our Troubled Institutions: The End(s) of Higher Education, Post-Journalism, and Antisemitism…
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Our political, societal and legislative landscape is changed by the information whistleblowers and activists bring to light, and in the current legal and political system, they often do this at great cost to themselves and their families. In today's show, Meg and Trev explore what this means for the activists who collect and disseminate footage fro…
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Do you have questions about what the future might look like? Do you wonder how you will fit into this new world? In today’s podcast, Thurza tells us about the audiobook 21 Lessons for the 21st Century written by Yuval Noah Harari and read by Derek Perkins. This book provides a kind of instruction manual for the present day to help readers find thei…
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The UConn 360 podcast is back…with some new co-hosts. Izzy Harris and Mike Enright of University Communications have taken over the reins of UConn 360 and hope to live up the high standards of information and entertainment provided by colleagues Tom Breen and Julie Bartucca. In this first (or 116th) episode, Izzy and Mike introduce themselves to th…
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In this conversation with Dr. Juanita Sundberg, we explore how our relationships with the more-than-human world are often shaped by our institutions and knowledge systems — which don’t always honor the diverse cosmologies and relationalities of life. Juanita draws on her work with Indigenous communities and organizations as she highlights how our e…
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Why is it important to think about the places we live, work and experience, when responding to climate change? Why do local communities matter to climate action - and vice versa? And what opportunities and constraints do communities face? Amy talks with Danielle Walker-Palmour, the Director of Friends Provident Foundation, which works towards a fai…
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In this episode of Bionic Planet, we delve into the inspiring journey of Marco Cerezo, the director of Fundaeco, a conservation NGO based in Guatemala. Marco shares his lifelong dedication to nature conservation, sustainable community development, and the fight against climate change. He recounts his early experiences studying development economics…
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In this episode, we explore with environmentalist and author Ashish Kothari how entrenched “development” ideologies have led to an immense loss of traditional knowledge and cultural systems and caused immeasurable ecological destruction in India and globally. Ashish highlights radical alternatives being led by communities in India and around the wo…
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Over the last two winter seasons atmospheric rivers have impacted California and the west with extreme precipitation and the cascading consequences of these events. The meteorology that causes atmospheric rivers is complex, but scientists at the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes (CW3E) are working to help better predict them and underst…
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In this episode, Michael talks with Marty Anderies, Professor in the School of Sustainability at Arizona State University. They discuss a book that Marty co-authored with Marco Janssen, a colleague of his at Arizona State, entitled Infrastructure for Sustainability. The book is designed to introduce readers to the work of Elinor “Lin” Ostrom and he…
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Play along and see if you can beat other listeners to the correct answers! Please donate to Radiothon to keep 3CR Radical Radio on-air: https://www.givenow.com.au/cr/freedomofspecies? Music played: The Decline 'Sentience or Selfishness' - https://peerecords.bandcamp.com/album/im-not-gonna-lie-to-you Vespertine 'Perfect Storm' - https://vespertineba…
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In episode 104 of Bionic Planet, I delve into the intricacies of carbon finance with my guest, David Antonioli. We explore the concept of transformational finance, where carbon payments are used to catalyze sustainable practices that can eventually stand on their own. We discuss the limitations of the current additionality tool, which focuses on in…
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In this episode, we turn our attention to the carbon footprint of the contemporary art world. What can galleries and museums do to reduce their CO2 emissions? How do curators and museum directors rethink their exhibition and conversation practices to reduce their institutions’ environmental footprint. Our guests are Amanda Hellman, the director of …
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Is a better world possible? Why are the stories we tell so important in the politics of climate? And what’s the relationship between social and environmental tipping points? Amy talks with Solitaire Townsend, co-founder and Chief Solutionist at “change agency” Futerra. Produced and presented by Amy Mount. Edited by Sarah Eldridge. For more insights…
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In this episode we speak with Dr. Clive Spash, an ecological economist who is fundamentally challenging conventional economic paradigms through his development of social ecological economics. His work addresses the intersections of human behavior, environmental values, and economic systems - advocating for a radical transformation towards a more so…
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Insects are among the most abundant organisms on Earth. About 350,000 beetle species, alone, have been described by science and this is considered to be only a fraction of their total number. In a variety of ways, insects are a fundamental part of natural and human-adapted systems. While some cause disease or ruin crops, others play a key role in e…
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How do we recalibrate the metrics of mainstream politics, such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP) often used to define a nation's “success” — and recenter them on our collective and planetary wellbeing? What could a truly regenerative economy encompass, and what might that mean for our immediate and long-term activism? In this episode, we welcome Aman…
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Ernest Scheyder is an author and senior correspondent for Reuters. His new book, The War Below: Lithium, Copper, and the Global Battle to Power Our Lives, looks at the impact of the green transition in the US – and, more particularly, the tensions over the increasing need to mine for metals to decarbonise the grid (and power a plethora of devices) …
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On today’s show we discuss intersectionality, liberation and veganism with our guest, Andrew. Andrew is a Melbourne born, raised, and based vegan activist of 18 years, advocating for human and non-human animal rights and social justice issues, whilst also raising a young vegan family. Being proudly Māori, Andrew is focussed on decolonialism in thou…
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In today’s podcast, coworkers Charlotte and Jessica get together to talk about Mister Magic, a '90s nostalgia-filled horror written by Kiersten White. Who is Mister Magic? In this dark supernatural thriller, former child stars reunite to uncover the tragedy that ended their show and discover the secret of its enigmatic host.Find this title in the F…
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In the 10th episode of PUAN podcast, co-host Saumya Pandey speaks with Geoscientist Jakob Steiner and Historian Lachlan Fleetwood on the 19th century imperialist traditions of remaking the Himalayas as geographical frontiers. We reflect on the genealogy of this Himalayan-frontier science. Jakob and Fleetwood discuss the fragile instruments and mode…
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How can Parliament force progress on climate when the Government is resistant? What does it take for backbench MPs to amend legislation? And how does their power wax and wane as the composition of Parliament changes? Amy talks with Isabella Gornall, who is Founder and Chair of Seahorse Environmental, a politics and communications agency. Produced a…
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