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Amplifying women’s voices in our world through performances, discussions and interviews. New Episodes drop on Wednesdays, bimonthly. Audio performances of exciting feminist plays, empowering discussions with our wonderful creative teams and insightful social justice interviews with community leaders who are passionate about making the world better for women.
 
The Female Veterans Podcast was created as a platform to raise awareness of the unique issues that face female heroes who serve and allow their diverse stories to be heard. Each episode features a "girl talk" style, real conversation. We discuss what it was like to serve, the transition out of active duty service, life as a veteran and how to make civilian life successful. The goal is to help other women by sharing our experiences - good or bad. This podcast is presented by Artemisia a new o ...
 
In this podcast, Rowan Hall and Tracey Harrison talk to you about ancient myths, local legends, and why stories have staying power. Each week we bring you new stories and talk about why these myths, fairy tales, fables, folktales and legends have such power in our society. Check us out each week and join us on our mythical journey. Our logo was designed by Jamie Harrison and our music was written and performed by Taylor Ash. Find out more about them on our website willingandfable.com
 
Plant Resilience. Plants Wisdom. Plant Plants. This podcast, hosted by Isaac Hill and A.C. Stauble brings together a network of people wise to the ways of plants, fungi and the natural world to explore the Mysteries of Nature. We invite herbalists, ethnobotanists, farmers, mages, fungi experts, community organizers and all kinds of other interesting people to the microphone to share their wisdom and experiences with us. The Plant Cunning Podcast bridges different worlds, makes connections, i ...
 
A podcast where two roommates ask each other about all the things we should know about - but don't. You Know What I've Been Wondering? is a comedy, history, and culture podcast answering the questions you've always wanted to ask. What are the actual origins of astrology? Why is Kombucha so popular? Who are the Bird Truthers? You ask, we answer. This is the opposite of mansplaining. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ykwibwpodcast/support
 
QuiltMoxie The podcast where QuiltMoxie meets Craftsy. Join your Host Ariana, who is enrolled in many Craftsy.com online classes, and come along as she shares her class progress with you. Craftsy is and online community dedicated to providing the best education and resources for crafters. You will find show notes and everything QuiltMoxie at www.QuiltMoxie.com . Get Social with QuiltMoxie and leave your comments and feedback at your favourite hangout, on iTunes or by email.
 
Song of the Soul invites you to a soul-level encounter. Music has the ability to proclaim the soul's language beyond what mere words can speak. That's what we seek as we invite our guests to share their Song of the Soul. You will hear the music that has charted the steps of their spiritual journey, that has provided a touchstone in the soul's dark night, and sung the hearts awe and joy when come to the Light. As you listen to Song of the Soul, you are both witness and companion to our guest' ...
 
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show series
 
In this episode we dive deep into flower essences with Sara Artemisia; what they are, how to make them, how to use them. We also talk about Akashic Records and money! You can find Sara at SaraArtemisia.com and you can support this podcast at Patreon.com/PlantCunning --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/plantcunning/messageSupport this pod…
 
Myesha-Tiara and Willow James team up to talk about the intersection of theatre and community in Chicago. Inspired by We Women audio performances of RACHEL, by Angelina W. Grimke, and AFTERMATH, by Mary Burrill, Willow and Myesha will introduce an exciting new episode coming up at WE WOMEN. Be sure to listen to our audio performance of RACHEL and A…
 
Tracey tells the tale of the most famous baroque painter you've probably never heard of. This week we deep dive into the life and work of Artemisia Gentileschi. Sources Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_Gentileschi https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_paint https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baroque_painting National gallery https://www.nat…
 
Artemisia Gentileschi is by far the most famous woman artist of the premodern era. Her art addressed issues that resonate today, such as sexual violence and women’s problematic relationship to political power. Her powerful paintings with vigorous female protagonists chime with modern audiences, and she is celebrated by feminist critics and scholars…
 
Cici Artemisia is always swimming on the deep side of the pool, even as she enchants & delights. In addition to the 2 decades she performed as part of Bordertown, she discovered a calling to music related to her personal healing journey after sexual abuse memories emerged. Her voice & lyrics shine & captivate, and the music of her guitar & other in…
 
Andy Douglas was a judge for the 2020, Song for Social Change, Volume 5, a product of the Renaissance Artists & Writers Association. Included in the top 10 were Alastair Moock, Jason Horowitz & The Whiskey Farm, Anita Aysola, Jeremy Facknitz, Dan Miraldi, and Sam Price & the True Believers. Check out Andy and his books, The Curve of the World: Into…
 
The Outside: Migration as Life in Morocco (Indiana UP, 2021) traces how migration has come to occupy a striking place in the lives of many Moroccans. A full 10 percent of the population now lives outside the country, affecting individual and collective life in countless unanticipated ways. In this intimate ethnography of rural Morocco, Alice Elliot…
 
A new approach to puritan studies has been emerging in recent decades, but until now, no single volume has tried to gather in a comprehensive way the new histories of this literature. In A History of American Puritan Literature (Cambridge UP, 2020), edited by Kristina Bross and Abram Van Engen, eighteen leading scholars in the field help to mark a …
 
Plato and the Mythic Tradition in Political Thought (Harvard UP, 2020) is an ambitious reinterpretation and defense of Plato’s basic enterprise and influence, arguing that the power of his myths was central to the founding of philosophical rationalism. Plato’s use of myths—the Myth of Metals, the Myth of Er—sits uneasily with his canonical reputati…
 
Political Theorist Robert Bartlett spoke with the New Books in Political Science podcast about two of his recent publications, which take on translating the work of two distinct classical thinkers, Aristotle and Aristophanes. In discussing these thinkers, we talked about two of Aristophanes’ earliest extant plays, The Acharnians and The Knights. We…
 
Artwork as opposed to experiment? Engineer versus artist? We often see two different cultural realms separated by impervious walls. But some fifty years ago, the borders between technology and art began to be breached. In Making Art Work: How Cold War Engineers and Artists Forged a New Creative Culture (MIT Press, 2020), W. Patrick McCray shows how…
 
In the 1970s, American curator Donna Stein served as an art advisor to Empress Farah Diba Pahlavi, the Shahbanu of Iran. Together, Stein and Pahlavi generated an art market in Iran, as Stein encouraged Pahlavi’s patronage of the Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art. Today, the contemporary section of the Iranian National Collection―most of which conti…
 
In Another Aesthetics Is Possible: Arts of Rebellion in the Fourth World War (Duke UP, 2021), Jennifer Ponce de León examines the roles that art can play in the collective labour of creating and defending another social reality. Focusing on artists and art collectives in Argentina, Mexico, and the United States, Ponce de León shows how experimental…
 
Elizabeth A. Povinelli’s inheritance was passed down not through blood or soil but through a framed map of Trentino, Alto Adige—the region where family's ancestral alpine village is found. Far more than a map hanging above the family television, the image featured colors and lines that held in place the memories and values fueling the Povinelli fam…
 
Today we are joined by Martha Moffitt Peacock, Professor of Art History at Brigham Young University about her new book, Heroines, Harpies, and Housewives: Imaging Women of Consequence in the Dutch Golden Age, out in 2020 with Brill. In Heroines, Harpies, and Housewives, Peacock provides a novel interpretive approach to the artistic practice of imag…
 
Artemisia Gentileschi is by far the most famous woman artist of the premodern era. Her art addressed issues that resonate today, such as sexual violence and women’s problematic relationship to political power. Her powerful paintings with vigorous female protagonists chime with modern audiences, and she is celebrated by feminist critics and scholars…
 
Artemisia Gentileschi is by far the most famous woman artist of the premodern era. Her art addressed issues that resonate today, such as sexual violence and women’s problematic relationship to political power. Her powerful paintings with vigorous female protagonists chime with modern audiences, and she is celebrated by feminist critics and scholars…
 
During the mid-sixteenth century, English reformers invited a group of continental Protestant refugees to London and surrounding provinces. The ecclesiastical authorities allowed them liberty to establish their own churches with relatively little oversight by the English church. These "Stranger Churches," many of whom still maintained close ties to…
 
Today we are joined by Martha Moffitt Peacock, Professor of Art History at Brigham Young University about her new book, Heroines, Harpies, and Housewives: Imaging Women of Consequence in the Dutch Golden Age, out in 2020 with Brill. In Heroines, Harpies, and Housewives, Peacock provides a novel interpretive approach to the artistic practice of imag…
 
Artemisia Gentileschi is by far the most famous woman artist of the premodern era. Her art addressed issues that resonate today, such as sexual violence and women’s problematic relationship to political power. Her powerful paintings with vigorous female protagonists chime with modern audiences, and she is celebrated by feminist critics and scholars…
 
What more can we learn about legendary American writer Elizabeth Bishop (1911-79), dubbed by Bethany Hicok “the most stunning poet of the twentieth century”, by exploring the wonderful archives of her life and work at Vassar? Why are literary archives coming back into vogue? How do new techniques in digital humanities create novel possibilities for…
 
In a time when questions about patriotism, nationalism, multiculturalism, and the like are sure to stir up controversy, Steven Smith offers a careful, balanced defense of what he calls “enlightened patriotism.” Smith, a professor of political science at Yale University, makes a point of distinguishing patriotism from nationalism; the latter, he wri…
 
Artemisia Gentileschi is by far the most famous woman artist of the premodern era. Her art addressed issues that resonate today, such as sexual violence and women’s problematic relationship to political power. Her powerful paintings with vigorous female protagonists chime with modern audiences, and she is celebrated by feminist critics and scholars…
 
What more can we learn about legendary American writer Elizabeth Bishop (1911-79), dubbed by Bethany Hicok “the most stunning poet of the twentieth century”, by exploring the wonderful archives of her life and work at Vassar? Why are literary archives coming back into vogue? How do new techniques in digital humanities create novel possibilities for…
 
In his pioneering study, Men in Metal: A Topography of Public Bronze Statuary in Modern Japan (Brill, 2020), Sven Saaler examines Japanese public statuary as a central site of historical memory from its beginnings in the Meiji period through the twenty-first century. Saaler shows how the elites of the modern Japanese nation-state went about constru…
 
In his follow-up to the Pulitzer Prize–winning The Metaphysical Club, acclaimed scholar and critic Louis Menand, Professor of English at Harvard University and staff writer at The New Yorker, offers a new intellectual and cultural history of the postwar years. The Cold War was not just a contest of power. It was also about ideas, in the broadest se…
 
In his follow-up to the Pulitzer Prize–winning The Metaphysical Club, acclaimed scholar and critic Louis Menand, Professor of English at Harvard University and staff writer at The New Yorker, offers a new intellectual and cultural history of the postwar years. The Cold War was not just a contest of power. It was also about ideas, in the broadest se…
 
In his follow-up to the Pulitzer Prize–winning The Metaphysical Club, acclaimed scholar and critic Louis Menand, Professor of English at Harvard University and staff writer at The New Yorker, offers a new intellectual and cultural history of the postwar years. The Cold War was not just a contest of power. It was also about ideas, in the broadest se…
 
In recent years Americans have experienced a range of assaults upon the truth. In The Constitution of Knowledge: A Defense of Truth (Brookings Institution Press, 2021), Jonathan Rauch describes the various ways in which our understanding of truth has come under attack, and the mechanisms that exist to fight back. As Rauch explains, the challenge of…
 
Turns out "objectivity" has a not-so clear-cut definition across time. In this podcast, Lorraine Daston and Peter Galison to discuss their work, Objectivity (Zone Books, 2010). This work traces the historical and cultural developments of the word “objective” as it acquired different meanings and associated practices. Similarly, they consider the ch…
 
As a young single mother Kerri interviewed for a well paying government job. After a fantastic interview she was informed that the job was hers if she joined The Army National Guard. On this episode we discuss her experiences as an officer, and young woman with a large family blazing a trail in her career. She shares the ups and downs of moving her…
 
Judi Jaeger grew up in Canada, but moved to the USA decades ago and became a US citizen. Considering her early passion for and proficiency in music, it's surprising that she completely abandoned that side of her soul for about 25 years, while studying and working as a lawyer, and as a parent. And even though she carried her guitar case with her thr…
 
Suzanne L. Marchand's new book Porcelain: A History from the Heart of Europe (Princeton University Press, 2020) balances several histories at once through the story of a single commodity. Rather than a history of art or aesthetics per se—though it certainly touches style and artists— Porcelain is at once a business history of mercantile productions…
 
Martin Luther - monk, priest, intellectual, or revolutionary - has been a controversial figure since the sixteenth century. Most studies of Luther stress his personality, his ideas, and his ambitions as a church reformer. In Luther, Conflict, and Christendom: Reformation Europe and Christianity in the West (Cambridge UP, 2018), Christopher Ocker br…
 
Suzanne L. Marchand's new book Porcelain: A History from the Heart of Europe (Princeton University Press, 2020) balances several histories at once through the story of a single commodity. Rather than a history of art or aesthetics per se—though it certainly touches style and artists— Porcelain is at once a business history of mercantile productions…
 
Paul Contino’s Catholic reading of Dostoevsky’s final masterwork, premised on the novel’s “powerful capacity to inspire readers to be better people”, follows hero Alyosha Karamazov’s spiritual maturation as a “monk in the world”, his ministry to his brothers, and his ultimate message of hope. In Dostoevsky's Incarnational Realism: Finding Christ am…
 
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