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Best Brookshire podcasts we could find (updated July 2020)
Best Brookshire podcasts we could find
Updated July 2020
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Science for the People is a long-format interview podcast that explores the connections between science, popular culture, history, and public policy, to help listeners understand the evidence and arguments behind what's in the news and on the shelves. Our hosts sit down with science researchers, writers, authors, journalists, and experts to discuss science from the past, the science that affects our lives today, and how science might change our future.
 
When the global pandemic known as The Fall began, the infrastructure of civilization collapsed. Within a matter of hours, millions were dead and billions more were dying. Hospitals filled to capacity, transforming from places of healing to houses of death. Some rare individuals were immune, while others responded to antibiotic treatments. However, demand far outpaced supply, with treatment only delaying death for most. Had the plague ended with The Fall, humanity might have recovered, but th ...
 
This podcast is everything theatre. You will hear from actors (young and old), stage managers, designers, directors, those who run companies, and everything in between. These are conversations with people I have worked with or wish to work with in the future. Have as much fun listening to these as I have creating them.
 
A podcast dedicated to artists’ moving image, experimental film and festivals and installation art. We talk to artists, programmers and curators, film festival producers and anyone else we meet whose work we enjoy or who we think you’ll find interesting. We will be asking people about what inspires them, how they approach their work, the highs and lows, how as artists we deal with criticism and self-doubt, and anything else that comes up.
 
The Talking Industrial Automation Podcast is a show to help you get to know the people that make modern manufacturing and processing possible. Along the way we will touch on integration technology, trends and challenges. If you are a manufacturer, end user/client, supplier or system integrator interested in industrial automation, I hope you will enjoy the insights CSIA Members will bring to this podcast. CSIA is the Control System Integrators Association, and exists to improve the profession ...
 
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We're all spending a bit more time indoors this summer than we probably figured. But did you ever stop to think about why the places we live and work as designed the way they are? And how they could be designed better? We're talking with Emily Anthes about her new book "The Great Indoors: The Surprising Science of how Buildings Shape our Behavior, …
 
Around the end of the second world war, a set of tiny miniature dioramas depicting a variety of deaths were created to help teach investigators how to approach a crime scene. You may have heard of the Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death and their maker, Frances Glessner Lee... but you probably didn't know how Lee became interested in forensics, t…
 
A series of strategic acquisitions, leadership hires and customer diversification fueled the growth and success of Applied Manufacturing Technologies says Craig Salvalaggio in this episode of Talking Industrial Automation. Plus, he reveals how his passion for robotics and machine vision led to his current position as COO, where he builds the busine…
 
Yes, bumble bees are important pollinators. But they're also fascinating, cute and colorful. This week's episode can trace its origins to a flowery Sierra Nevada meadow where host Carolyn Wilke reported on guest Michelle Duennes' project of catching bumble bees to study their health. Three years and hundreds of bees later, we check in on the projec…
 
We're taking a step back from our scheduled episode this week to ensure the important discussions around Black Lives Matter continue to stay in focus. Black voices are leading conversations about deep-rooted racism they have experienced and witnessed. These conversations aren't hard to find. We've included a few resources below to get you started i…
 
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop…
 
This week on Science for the People, we're diving into the world of DNA barcoding. We speak with Mehrdad Hajibabaei, Associate Professor in the Department of Integrative Biology and the Centre for Biodiversity Genomics at the University of Guelph, about the International Barcode of Life. And we discuss how you can contribute to the field of DNA bar…
 
Like many people these days, you might be spending your time at home making bread. Maybe you couldn't find instant yeast and decided that sourdough didn't sound that hard. But the colony of wild yeast you've nurtured is more marvelous than you probably expect. Today host Marion Kilgour discusses a small corner of the wonderful world of yeast with S…
 
One of the most amazing things modern medicine does is organ transplants: literally taking organs like the lungs or the heart from recently dead people and using them to replace the failing organs in living, critically ill people, giving them a second shot at living a fuller life. How and when did we first figure out how to do this? What does a mod…
 
Artist filmmakers Mark Lyken (films, video installations and sound works) and Emma Dove (film, installation and photography) live and work together in rural Dumfriesshire, Scotland. Together they combine their experience as individual artists to produce immersive films and moving image installations. See our website for images and links to some of …
 
Medicines. We all need to take them. And it seems like the prices are just getting higher and higher. Luckily, generics offer a cheaper alternative. And we are told that they are both the same drug and do the same thing, we assume in the same way. But it turns out that's not really quite true. This week, we're talking with Katherine Eban about her …
 
With many schools closed and parents looking for resources to help keep children stuck at home engaged and still learning, the hosts of Science for the People stuck on our curation caps and did some digging to create a list of STEM themed online resources for students of all ages and interests. This week we take a break from our usual format so tha…
 
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: T…
 
An insurance broker, lawyer and accountant answer your the frequently asked questions about the pandemic and what it means for the system integrator and manufacturing business. A transcript of this episode is available here. A programming note: This episode of the podcast was recorded on March 19, 2020, while the global pandemic situation was still…
 
This week is all about fish. All about ALL the fish, actually. Biomechanicist Adam Summers shares about his adventures in studying fish and CT scanning them. Adam and a community of researchers are working to take 3D scans of all known fish on Earth: some 34,000 species and counting. New host Carolyn Wilke and Adam discuss the project, the diversit…
 
This week we take a closer look at what cancer is, how it works, and what makes it so hard to treat without shying away or ignoring the human experience of cancer for patients and their families. We talk with Dr Azra Raza, oncologist, Professor of Medicine, Director of the MDS Center at Columbia University, and author of the new book "The First Cel…
 
Julie Gaier, a content marketing specialist with TRG Marketing, reveals how her skills as an Emmy-award winning television reporter educate the industrial automation industry in this episode of Talking Industrial Automation. Plus, you'll learn how media opportunities can turn into profits, as well as tips for how even companies with small budgets c…
 
This week on Science for the People, we're discussing how Siksika become one of the official translation languages for press releases from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). The area of the world that is now known as Canada has an abundance of distinct languages; according to the 2016 Census, over 70 are still spoken. B…
 
This week, we're discussing the opportunities and challenges of using Zulu, a language that has traditionally been excluded from science journalism, to share discoveries with a new audience. Host Marion Kilgour speaks with Sibusiso Biyela, science communicator at ScienceLink and a contributor at South African science news website SciBraai.Related l…
 
Algae. What springs to mind when you read that word? Maybe a seaweed forest? Maybe a pond covered in scum? Maybe a red tide? Those are all algae, and they can all change the world in different ways. This week Bethany Brookshire talks with Ruth Kassinger about the history, present and future of algae and her new book, "Slime: How Algae Created Us, P…
 
In the series finale, Wyatt struggles with hard choices, Hawkins makes the ultimate sacrifice and MJ makes an awkward revelation, altering the future of the Atlanta Survivors, forever. Thanks to all the folks that waited five years for the entire series to drop! And for those of you that enjoyed it, hang in a little longer for the reboot, where we'…
 
This week we're talking about land and ocean conservation: what it means to protect our land and oceans, the complexities of competing interests and international boundries, and how well Canada is doing at conserving its most important wild areas. Helping us wrap our heads around it are National Parks Program Director Alison Ronson and National Oce…
 
Chris Tury Jr., a partner and general manager of Outbound Technologies Inc., reveals how the company strategically diversified from the automotive industry into other vertical markets to promote resiliency and grow Outbound into a $15 million company, in this episode of Talking Industrial Automation. Plus, you'll hear how Outbound achieves an 80%-p…
 
This week on Science for the People, we're discussing dark personality traits. Everyone has them, and how they manifest themselves depends on your "D" level. We'll be speaking with Ingo Zettler, a Professor of Psychology at the University of Copenhagen and a member of the team of researchers who put forward the theory of the common core of dark per…
 
Demelza Kooij is an artist, filmmaker, and lecturer. Her work is presented at film festivals, museums, art exhibitions, and conferences. Her latest film 'Wolves From Above' won the Jury Prize at the 57th Ann Arbor Film Festival. She has previously taught at Edinburgh College of Art and worked at the Scottish Documentary Institute. I talked to Demel…
 
It's 2020, but we're looking back. What were the biggest science stories of 2019? Well, it was a big year for lots of things. Black hole pictures, vaping illnesses... and lots and lots of climate change news. Come on a trip down memory lane with us and the writers at Science News magazine as we take a look back at some of the top science stories of…
 
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