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Best Cecilia Nasti/Texas Parks podcasts we could find (updated November 2019)
Best Cecilia Nasti/Texas Parks podcasts we could find
Updated November 2019
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Get ready for the great outdoors! Listen in to explore nature, wildlife and the best of life outside. Pick up pro tips for camping, cooking and more. Host Cecilia Nasti takes you along as both outdoor experts and everyday people reveal why life’s better outside, Under the Texas Sky.
 
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Passport to Texas
Weekly+
 
Your radio guide to the great Texas outdoors
 
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Amy and Caleb Maxwell This is Passport to Texas Your backyard is a wild place filled with wild things. To see them, slow down, look and listen. My colleague Randall Maxwell’s children, 17-year-old Amy and 14-year-old Caleb shared their thoughts on backyard nature during a stroll with their dad on the family’s property in Dripping Springs. Here’ ...…
 
Surfing at South Padre This is Passport to Texas As a kid, Tony Smith loved knowing how things worked and creating with his hands; he also had a passion for water. We grew up in Houston and so we would go down and go fishing—my brothers, my parents. All the time. We just loved being around the water. Later in life, in college, I started surfing ...…
 
The Lady Bird Lake Paddling Trail is approximately 11 miles long and features multiple public access sites and recreational opportunities. The Lady Bird Lake Paddling Trail provides an excellent venue for the novice and experienced paddler alike. This is Passport to Texas Nature tourism fostered the development of many trails statewide. On land ...…
 
Preparing for a star party, image Chris Oswalt, TPWD This is Passport to Texas The term “nature tourism” has evolved to include a diverse range of outdoor activities. Advancements in new tools and technologies enhance the outdoor experience. Nature tourism is any kind of tourism that allows people to connect with nature and provide economic imp ...…
 
Wildfires can be scary. But they’re nature’s way of clearing areas for plant growth and help preserve native plants that support wildlife. Humans suppressed these natural wildfires, making them worse when they do occur. Listen in as we visit Austin’s Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center and learn how “prescribed burning” – starting planned, contr ...…
 
Hawk Tower Bird Watching. This is Passport to Texas Texas Parks and Wildlife brought the nature tourism movement to Texas in the 1990’s. Madge Lindsay worked with a couple of other people and developed this idea of a birding trail. Shelly Plante is the Nature Tourism Manager. No one had ever linked together sites that were drivable distances fr ...…
 
Centennial Artist, Clemente Guzman This is Passport to Texas I love nature. I love being outside. Artist Clemente Guzman has a genuine affection for the outdoors. He spent twenty-nine and a half years at Texas Parks and Wildlife depicting the natural beauty of the state. I create art because it inspires me, it moves me, and being out in nature ...…
 
Texas State Parks. This is Passport to Texas The year 2023 is the centennial anniversary of Texas State Parks, and thirty-one Texas artists have been chosen to create illustrations for a printed book about the State Park System. The whole history of conservation in the United States, particularly in the national parks, it was aided and abetted ...…
 
Endangered Ocelot This is Passport to Texas The endangered Ocelot once roamed many parts of Texas. But over the years, loss of their native thorn-scrub habitat has left only a handful of Ocelots in the Rio Grande Valley. We need to restore their habitat as quickly as possible because they’re just really in dire need. Dr. Sandra Rideout-Hanzak i ...…
 
Lesser prairie-chicken. Image courtesy USFWS This is Passport to Texas The Lesser Prairie Chicken used to roam many parts of Texas. But over the years, the wide-open grassland prairies they depend on have been greatly reduced by development and land fragmentation. Lesser Prairie Chickens are important because they are an indicator species on th ...…
 
Camp Wildflower, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. Image courtesy of wildflower.org. This is Passport to Texas This is called the Dino Creek. Or Dinosaur Creek… The Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center located in Austin is grooming the conservationists of tomorrow. Camp Wildflower is showing and demonstrating to children how they can appreciat ...…
 
If you’re into fresh, locally-sourced food and connecting with nature, join us as our group forages for wild foods. Then Austin chef and author Jesse Griffiths cooks them into an awesome meal. All this freshness takes place at ecological showpiece Llano Springs Ranch, part of the new Explore Ranches conservation enterprise.…
 
Join us for the debut of our new occasional series, The Art of Nature, where we tell the stories of artists that create art to tell stories about nature. In this episode, we spotlight San Antonio painter Jesus Toro Martinez, reminding us we’re not just observers, but also characters in the saga of life.…
 
Spotted sea trout is wildly popular with people who fish the Texas coast. This episode we’ll find out how this tasty salt-water trout is raised, and how it’s protected through fishing regulations. Chef Cindy Haenel demonstrates cooking sea trout meunière – so good – and shares the simply delicious recipe.…
 
The Guadalupe bass is a feisty little fish that makes its home in the cool, clear-running waters of Hill Country streams and rivers. It’s the State Fish of Texas, and we explore how what’s good for this fish is also good for our rivers. We also visit South Llano River State Park and meet the park supervisor who works and plays in this natural w ...…
 
Summer in Texas means biking, camping – so many outdoor activities. Don’t let the heat put a sweaty damper on the fun! Listen as we share heat hacks for both you and your partner-in-fun: your dog. We’ll also check in with the Neves and hear a listener describe her star-studded experience.By Cecilia Nasti/Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
 
Sometimes the canary in the coalmine is a fish in a river. At Caddo Lake in deep east Texas, that fish – the paddlefish – is older than dinosaurs. Learn about efforts to restore this ancient animal to east Texas waters, and why the paddlefish is the “poster child” for restoring the health of an entire ecosystem. We also check in with siblings C ...…
 
Wildlife is found across Texas, including wild turkeys. Hear the story of how these birds almost disappeared but were saved by conservation practices. We’ll also discuss how to call them to you, the 3 different kinds, and turkey harems. For you locavores, we’ve got pro tips for hunting and cooking turkey.…
 
In this podcast we talk with invertebrate biologists and the horticulture director of the Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center. We discuss the relationship between native plants and their pollinator pals, and how honeybees are not necessarily the best pollinators out there. They just have better press. In fact, honeybees may play a part in native ...…
 
Fishing is a fun way to get outside, relax and enjoy nature. And fish make a delicious, locally-sourced, low-fat meal. Join us as we explore how rainbow trout and catfish are grown at a fish hatchery, then released into lakes and ponds. We’ll also check in with our sibling duo as they tackle fishing in Austin.…
 
By Cecilia Nasti/Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
 
Meet siblings Cassandra and Christopher as they prepare to reconnect with nature. They have some anxieties, so eco-therapist Amy Sugeno discusses strategies to overcome fears of being outdoors. We’ll also explore ways to find your next adventure, whether you’re a newbie or already love life outside.By Cecilia Nasti/Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
 
By Cecilia Nasti/Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
 
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