Best Connectome podcasts we could find (Updated December 2018)
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The Scope Health Sciences Radio “Science and Research” podcast reports on the latest medical discoveries and breakthroughs in addition to discussing in-depth health topics. The opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of The University of Utah.
 
Breaking news from the frontiers of neuroscience.
 
Brain Science is hosted by Ginger Campbell, MD. It explores how recent discoveries in neuroscience are unraveling the mystery of how our brains make us human. Full show notes and episode transcripts are available at http://brainsciencepodcast.com.
 
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BS 151 is a discussion of The Neuroscience of Emotion: A New Synthesis by Ralph Adolphs and David J. Anderson. We talk about key ideas from the book and relate them to several previous episodes about emotion including interviews with Jaak Panksepp, Lisa Feldman Barrett and Luis Pessoa. Details show notes and episode transcripts will be availabl ...…
 
BS 150 is my 4th interview with Dr. Seth Grant, the molecular biologist who has discovered surprising things about the evolution of the synapse, including the fact that vertebrates have much more complex synapses than invertebrates. In this interview we talk about his latest paper in Neuron in which his team has developed a method for mapping t ...…
 
This brief announcement is to correct a mistake I made in BS 148. For several months I have been talking about my trip to Australia in 2019. I have posted this brief audio to clarify that October 1 was the first day to put down your deposit for the trip (not the deadline). The dates in Australia will be May 20-30, 2018 and I have included the P ...…
 
Brain Science 149 is an episode for listeners of all backgrounds. It is an interview with Dr. Dean Burnett, author of Happy Brain: Where Happiness Comes From, and Why. We look beyond the hype about dopamine and consider how our social nature impacts our happiness. Complete show notes and episode transcripts are available at http://brainsciencep ...…
 
BS 148 is the interview with pioneering neuroscientist Dr. Eve Marder, which I originally recorded back in 2009. I am reposting it now as a follow-up to last month's review of Charlotte Nassim's excellent biography Lessons from the Lobster: Eve Marder's Work in Neuroscience. The topics discussed in this interview are just as relevant as they we ...…
 
BS 147 is a discussion of the new biography Lessons from the Lobster: Eve Marder's Work in Neuroscience by Charlotte Nassim. This is an intellectual biography of one of neuroscientists least know pioneers. Dr. Marder was interviewed on this podcast back in BSP 56, which is also now free to download. In this episode I take you through some of Dr ...…
 
This is an interview with MIT neuroscientist, Dr. Alan Jasanoff about his book The Biological Mind: How Brain, Body, and Environment Collaborate to Make Us Who We Are. We talk about what he calls the "cerebral mystique" and why it is important to remember because the brain is embodied it is not autonomous. The Mind is the result of the interact ...…
 
BS 145 celebrates the return of Dr. Maryanne Wolf who was featured back in BSP 29 when we talked about her bestseller Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. In this episode we talk about her recent book Tales of Literacy for the 21st Century. Our focus is two-fold. First we consider the implications of the fact that w ...…
 
This is an interview with Dr. Angela Friederici, author of Language in Our Brain: The Origins of a Uniquely Human Capacity. Her book is an extensive review of decades of research, but this interview provides an accessible introduction to listeners of all backgrounds. Don't miss our new monthly Facebook live sessions where listeners can submit q ...…
 
BS 143 is an interview with Dr. Elkhonon Goldberg, author of Creativity: The Human Brain in the Age of Innovation. We explore the roles of both the pre-frontal lobes and the right cerebral hemisphere, and we consider how the rapid rate of change may actually be decreasing the incidence of dementia by forcing older people to learn new skills rat ...…
 
BS 142 is an interview with neuroscientist Michael Graziano about his latest book The Spaces Between Us: A Story of Neuroscience, Evolution, and Human Nature. We explore the discovery of peripersonal neurons and discover how deeply they are imbedded in our daily lives. For show notes and complete transcripts go to http://brainsciencepodcast.com ...…
 
The United States infant mortality rate ranks among the worst for wealthy nations, a clear sign that our nation’s health needs improving. This year’s Frontiers in Precision Medicine III symposium will focus on combining the best approaches from two seemingly disparate disciplines—population health and individualized medicine—to pave the way tow ...…
 
A new study reveals that patients receiving radiofrequency catheter ablation compared to traditional drug therapies for atrial fibrillation (AF), a contributing factor to heart failure, have significantly lower hospitalization and mortality rates. The findings are published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study's lead author, cardio ...…
 
BS 141 is an interview with Rodrigo Quian Quiroga, author of The Forgetting Machine: Memory, Perception, and the "Jennifer Aniston Neuron." We explore how our brains construct both perception and memory, with an emphasis on meaning over exact detail. We also explore why this is important and how it makes humans very different from artificial in ...…
 
BS 140 is our 11th Annual Review episode. We look back at the highlights from 2017. New listeners will get a good feel for the ideas and guests that appeared, while regular listeners will have a chance to review a few key ideas. This year I also include a few highlights from the 2017 annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience. Please visit ...…
 
Anyone who has had back pain—and that’s nearly all of us—knows how debilitating it can be. Even more frustrating is that for many, that pain comes back, again and again, no matter what they try. Julie Fritz, Ph.D., associate dean for research in the College of Health talks about what makes back pain, and back pain treatment, different. She expl ...…
 
Jeff Hawkins founded Numenta in 2005, shortly after publishing his best seller "On Intelligence." Numenta's goal is to create a computer model of how the human cortex functions and more importantly advance our theoretical understanding of why it has the structure that it does. In BS 139 Hawkins describes some of his team's latest research and s ...…
 
High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and can lead to potentially life-threatening heart attacks and strokes. A clinical trial called SPRINT has changed the way doctors look at blood pressure for long-term patient health. The Scope Radio's Julie Kiefer speaks with Dr. Brandon Bellow and Dr. Natalia Ruiz-Negrón a ...…
 
There’s a real problem within the medical science community regarding reliability. Today, more and more science articles are being published, but many lack the reliability we can rely on. The Scope Radio’s Julie Kiefer talks with Melissa Rethlefsen and Melanie Lackey from University of Utah Eccles Health Science Library to discuss the problem o ...…
 
In BS 138 Dr. John Medina returns to discuss his latest book Brain Rules for Aging Well: 10 Principles for Staying Vital, Happy, and Sharp. This is a lively discussion full of useful information for listeners of all ages. If you listen via the free Brain Science mobile app you also listen to Dr. Medina's original interview (BSP 37), which is in ...…
 
In BS 137 neuroscientist Seth Grant describes his surprising new discovery that brain complexity is controlled by a "genetic lifespan calendar" that determines the timing of brain changes through out the lifespan. We also explore the exciting implications of this discovery. Please visit http://brainsciencepodcast.com for detailed show notes and ...…
 
Infection from a common virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV), is the leading cause of non-genetic hearing loss in U.S. newborns. Even though the virus is far more prevalent than Zika, it remains relatively unheard of. ENT specialist Dr. Albert Park explains what can happen when infants are exposed to CMV while in the womb and steps that pregnant women ...…
 
In Brain Science 136 we discuss "Language at the Speed of Sight: How We Read, Why So Many Can’t, and What Can Be Done About It" by Mark Seidenberg. We consider the disturbing gap between our scientific knowledge of reading and current education practices in the US. This episode will provide the listener with some important basics about how read ...…
 
This episode features Dr. Lisa Feldman Barrett, author of How Emotions Are Made. We discuss the evidence AGAINST the classical theory that emotions are universal and hardwired, as well as her new theory of Constructed Emotions. This new theory has significant implications for how we understand ourselves and others. Detailed show notes are avail ...…
 
Building a road map of all the nerve connections in the brain, including in the eye, is key to understanding what makes us who we are. Bryan Jones, Ph.D., an investigator at the Moran Eye Center, talks about his research building a connectome of the retina. He explains how he and his colleagues are approaching the massive project and how such w ...…
 
Dr. Jaak Panksepp, pioneer of Affective Neuroscience died in April 2017 at the age of 73. Because he was one of our most popular guests we are replaying his first interview from 2010. Please visit Brain Science website for detailed show notes and links to transcripts. Here are links to the show notes for his other free interviews. BS 91 Books a ...…
 
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a big public health concern. These so-called superbugs are resistant to life-saving drugs that we take for granted. Dr. Barbara Jones, a pulmonologist with University of Utah Health and the VA IDEAS Center for Innovation, explains how the habits and attitudes of some doctors are fueling the problem and what can ...…
 
Mice destined to get cancer live longer when they have plenty of social interactions, mental activity, and exercise. Huntsman Cancer Institute investigator Dr. Melinda Angus-Hill led a research study that revealed this surprising finding. She explains how an enriched lifestyle impacts cancer, what changes biologically, and the potential implica ...…
 
Recent studies show the majority of published research cannot successfully be replicated. This could potentially question the validity of tens of thousands of scientific studies. Hilda Bastian, chief editor of PubMed Commons, talks about what this means to the scientific field and how it could impact the general public.…
 
How many neurons does the typical human brain contain? The oft-quoted number of 100 billion turns out to have been a guess that was wrong! By a lot! Dr. Suzana Herculano-Houzel is the Brazilian neuroscientist who developed a revolutionary new technique for accurately counting the neurons in brains of all sizes. She shocked the scientific commun ...…
 
For most people, a diagnosis of advanced heart failure signals an inevitable decline with no chance for recovery. However, a few years ago, doctors found a small yet signiLicant proportion of these patients can bounce back if their heart is given a chance to rest with help from a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Scientist Sarah Franklin i ...…
 
The White House has proposed a major budget cut in government agencies that fund scientific research, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Bryan Jones, Ph.D., a scientist at the Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah, says the mere idea keeps him up at night. “I’m terrified,” he says. “The prospect of a 20 percent cut to the b ...…
 
An aquatic snail from the Caribbean Sea could hold the secret to a new type of pain killer in its venom. Dr. Michael McIntosh, a scientist at University of Utah Health, is working to isolate pain-killing compounds that could serve as a non-addictive replacement for opioids. In this episode, Dr. McIntosh talks about what his early research has f ...…
 
A three-foot shelled “worm” that looks like a unicorn’s horn? It just goes to show that the great blue planet we live on still holds some surprises. Naturalist Margo Haygood from the College of Pharmacy at the University of Utah tells the tale of how she and her colleagues came upon the odd beast and what it has taught them about the diversity ...…
 
Dr. William Uttal first appeared on the Brain Science Podcast back in 2012. He was a long time critic of over reliance of certain types of brain imaging, especially fMRI, in cognitive neuroscience. Sadly, he died in February 2017, so in his honor I am replaying that original interview. The points he made are just as relevant now as they were 5 ...…
 
In science, you may never know where your research will take you, and the results might be a surprise. Wesley Sundquist, Ph.D knows this as well as anyone. Dr. Sundquist is a University of Utah Professor of Biochemistry, and his research on how viruses function may hold the key to a new “delivery system,” which could allow for the transfer of s ...…
 
In this episode we focus on the most recent 5 years of Brain Science, looking back at our guests and topics with a focus on the question What is Mind? Since there is no consensus about this deeply human question, I am sharing how my own thoughts have grown and evolved over 10 years of reading, talking to scientists and philosophers and creating ...…
 
In this episode, Dr. Ginger Campbell celebrates The Brain Science Podcast/Brain Science's 10 year anniversary. This episode focuses on the first 5 years of the podcast. Find out how the show got started and listen as Dr. Campbell shares some of her most memorable episodes. We also have some listener feedback, so join us for the celebration! For ...…
 
It seems like every week there is some new health study in the news. One week coffee is good for your health. It’s causing cancer the next. Is it all right for scientists to get things wrong? According to Christie Aschwanden, lead science writer for FiveThirtyEight, there are always uncertainties in science. Being proven wrong is just part of t ...…
 
In December, Brain Science (podcast) will celebrate its 10th Anniversary. I want to include listener feedback so I posted this brief call to action. Please send your mp3 or email to brainsciencepodcast@gmail.com. Also, if you enjoy our sponsor Audible.com, please check out Permanent Present Tense: The Unforgettable Life of the Amnesic Patient, ...…
 
For years, scientists have known that someone who is thin could still end up with diabetes. Yet an obese person may be surprisingly healthy. Scott Summers, Ph.D., chair of nutrition and integrative physiology, and Bhagirath Chaurasia, Ph.D., assistant professor at the University of Utah College of Health explain their new research that points t ...…
 
In episode 129, Dr. Brenda Milner comes on the show to talk about her life's work and her most famous experiments. Dr. Milner was a pioneer in the field of neuropsychology and in the study of memory and other cognitive functions in humankind. She studied the effects of damage to the medial temporal lobe on memory and systematically described th ...…
 
A factor found in umbilical cord blood could become the basis for a new therapy to fight sepsis, a leading cause of death in hospitals, explains Christian Con Yost, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Utah. He is corresponding author on a study published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, showing that when given ...…
 
In episode 128, Jon Mallat is here to talk about the book he co-authored, "The Ancient Origins of Consciousness: How the Brain Created Experience". The focus on this conversation is on primary consciousness, the most base form of consciousness. We differentiate between the types of consciousness and utilize and inter-disciplinary approach to th ...…
 
When we rise out of bed in the morning, the pressure within our eyes changes massively - by 100-fold - and yet no damage is done. David Krizaj, Ph.D., Moran Eye Center investigator and professor of ophthalmology at the University of Utah, has discovered mechanisms that protect cells within the eyes from fluctuations in pressure, and has found t ...…
 
Brain Science (formerly the Brain Science Podcast) has been on a 6 month hiatus. This short audio provides information for both new listeners and longtime fans. I talk briefly about the background and content of the show. Then I explain how to get more out of our website at http://brainsciencepodcast.com. Finally I review all the options for su ...…
 
Genome sequencing - reading our complete set of DNA instructions - is a powerful tool for understanding and diagnosing disease, and has become integral to precision medicine, a movement to bring the right treatment to the right person and the right time. Does that mean that everyone should have their DNA sequenced? Eric Green, M.D., Ph.D., dire ...…
 
Some diseases are so rare and unusual that doctors have never seen anything like it. An excruciating journey for both families and doctors, figuring out what’s wrong can take years, if an answer is ever found at all. Using a computer tool developed by Aaron Quinlan, Ph.D., he and his team recently uncovered the genetic causes behind nearly one ...…
 
The unexpected death of a child is tragic under any circumstance, but it becomes even more so when the reason why is unknown. Martin Tristani-Firouzi, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at the University of Utah, leads the Sudden Death in the Young Center which is searching the DNA of the deceased for an explanation of why they died unexpectedly. H ...…
 
If you're a scientist, systematic reviews - a survey of published results to answer a specific research question - may not be as easy to carry out as you think. Melissa Rethlefsen and Mellanye Lackey from the Eccles Health Sciences Library at the University of Utah and the Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS) Systematic Reviews ...…
 
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