Best Connectomics podcasts we could find (Updated March 2019)
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The Scope Health Sciences Radio “Science and Research” podcast reports on the latest medical discoveries and breakthroughs in addition to discussing in-depth health topics. The opinions expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of The University of Utah.
 
Internationally exhibited and published multimedia artist and writer Tullio Francesco DeSantis provides arts listings, reviews, and commentary as well as important national and international art and culture news. Updated monthly, ARTologyPOD is your current culture connection.
 
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Anyone who has had back pain—and that’s nearly all of us—knows how debilitating it can be. Even more frustrating is that for many, that pain comes back, again and again, no matter what they try. Julie Fritz, Ph.D., associate dean for research in the College of Health talks about what makes back pain, and back pain treatment, different. She expl ...…
 
Despite major advances in treating and preventing heart disease, the condition is still a leading cause of death in the U.S. At the Utah Cardiac Recovery Symposium, Dr. Gary Gibbons, director of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, outlined the institute’s strategic vision for improving the health of Americans in a conversation with D ...…
 
The United States infant mortality rate ranks among the worst for wealthy nations, a clear sign that our nation’s health needs improving. This year’s Frontiers in Precision Medicine III symposium will focus on combining the best approaches from two seemingly disparate disciplines—population health and individualized medicine—to pave the way tow ...…
 
A new study reveals that patients receiving radiofrequency catheter ablation compared to traditional drug therapies for atrial fibrillation (AF), a contributing factor to heart failure, have significantly lower hospitalization and mortality rates. The findings are published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study's lead author, cardio ...…
 
High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and can lead to potentially life-threatening heart attacks and strokes. A clinical trial called SPRINT has changed the way doctors look at blood pressure for long-term patient health. The Scope Radio's Julie Kiefer speaks with Dr. Brandon Bellow and Dr. Natalia Ruiz-Negrón a ...…
 
There’s a real problem within the medical science community regarding reliability. Today, more and more science articles are being published, but many lack the reliability we can rely on. The Scope Radio’s Julie Kiefer talks with Melissa Rethlefsen and Melanie Lackey from University of Utah Eccles Health Science Library to discuss the problem o ...…
 
Infection from a common virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV), is the leading cause of non-genetic hearing loss in U.S. newborns. Even though the virus is far more prevalent than Zika, it remains relatively unheard of. ENT specialist Dr. Albert Park explains what can happen when infants are exposed to CMV while in the womb and steps that pregnant women ...…
 
Building a road map of all the nerve connections in the brain, including in the eye, is key to understanding what makes us who we are. Bryan Jones, Ph.D., an investigator at the Moran Eye Center, talks about his research building a connectome of the retina. He explains how he and his colleagues are approaching the massive project and how such w ...…
 
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a big public health concern. These so-called superbugs are resistant to life-saving drugs that we take for granted. Dr. Barbara Jones, a pulmonologist with University of Utah Health and the VA IDEAS Center for Innovation, explains how the habits and attitudes of some doctors are fueling the problem and what can ...…
 
Mice destined to get cancer live longer when they have plenty of social interactions, mental activity, and exercise. Huntsman Cancer Institute investigator Dr. Melinda Angus-Hill led a research study that revealed this surprising finding. She explains how an enriched lifestyle impacts cancer, what changes biologically, and the potential implica ...…
 
Recent studies show the majority of published research cannot successfully be replicated. This could potentially question the validity of tens of thousands of scientific studies. Hilda Bastian, chief editor of PubMed Commons, talks about what this means to the scientific field and how it could impact the general public.…
 
For most people, a diagnosis of advanced heart failure signals an inevitable decline with no chance for recovery. However, a few years ago, doctors found a small yet signiLicant proportion of these patients can bounce back if their heart is given a chance to rest with help from a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Scientist Sarah Franklin i ...…
 
The White House has proposed a major budget cut in government agencies that fund scientific research, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Bryan Jones, Ph.D., a scientist at the Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah, says the mere idea keeps him up at night. “I’m terrified,” he says. “The prospect of a 20 percent cut to the b ...…
 
An aquatic snail from the Caribbean Sea could hold the secret to a new type of pain killer in its venom. Dr. Michael McIntosh, a scientist at University of Utah Health, is working to isolate pain-killing compounds that could serve as a non-addictive replacement for opioids. In this episode, Dr. McIntosh talks about what his early research has f ...…
 
A three-foot shelled “worm” that looks like a unicorn’s horn? It just goes to show that the great blue planet we live on still holds some surprises. Naturalist Margo Haygood from the College of Pharmacy at the University of Utah tells the tale of how she and her colleagues came upon the odd beast and what it has taught them about the diversity ...…
 
In science, you may never know where your research will take you, and the results might be a surprise. Wesley Sundquist, Ph.D knows this as well as anyone. Dr. Sundquist is a University of Utah Professor of Biochemistry, and his research on how viruses function may hold the key to a new “delivery system,” which could allow for the transfer of s ...…
 
It seems like every week there is some new health study in the news. One week coffee is good for your health. It’s causing cancer the next. Is it all right for scientists to get things wrong? According to Christie Aschwanden, lead science writer for FiveThirtyEight, there are always uncertainties in science. Being proven wrong is just part of t ...…
 
For years, scientists have known that someone who is thin could still end up with diabetes. Yet an obese person may be surprisingly healthy. Scott Summers, Ph.D., chair of nutrition and integrative physiology, and Bhagirath Chaurasia, Ph.D., assistant professor at the University of Utah College of Health explain their new research that points t ...…
 
A factor found in umbilical cord blood could become the basis for a new therapy to fight sepsis, a leading cause of death in hospitals, explains Christian Con Yost, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Utah. He is corresponding author on a study published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, showing that when given ...…
 
When we rise out of bed in the morning, the pressure within our eyes changes massively - by 100-fold - and yet no damage is done. David Krizaj, Ph.D., Moran Eye Center investigator and professor of ophthalmology at the University of Utah, has discovered mechanisms that protect cells within the eyes from fluctuations in pressure, and has found t ...…
 
Genome sequencing - reading our complete set of DNA instructions - is a powerful tool for understanding and diagnosing disease, and has become integral to precision medicine, a movement to bring the right treatment to the right person and the right time. Does that mean that everyone should have their DNA sequenced? Eric Green, M.D., Ph.D., dire ...…
 
Some diseases are so rare and unusual that doctors have never seen anything like it. An excruciating journey for both families and doctors, figuring out what’s wrong can take years, if an answer is ever found at all. Using a computer tool developed by Aaron Quinlan, Ph.D., he and his team recently uncovered the genetic causes behind nearly one ...…
 
The unexpected death of a child is tragic under any circumstance, but it becomes even more so when the reason why is unknown. Martin Tristani-Firouzi, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at the University of Utah, leads the Sudden Death in the Young Center which is searching the DNA of the deceased for an explanation of why they died unexpectedly. H ...…
 
If you're a scientist, systematic reviews - a survey of published results to answer a specific research question - may not be as easy to carry out as you think. Melissa Rethlefsen and Mellanye Lackey from the Eccles Health Sciences Library at the University of Utah and the Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS) Systematic Reviews ...…
 
Nearly anyone who has worked in research is familiar with the frustrating scenario: a postdoc leaves for another job, and with him goes all sorts of valuable knowledge. It’s become loud and clear that results from many published scientific studies are unreliable. While ethical violations like fraud clearly contribute to the problem, so does a s ...…
 
All too often an answer to the simple question of “what is making me sick?” does not come easily. Current methods for figuring out what viruses or bacteria are causing infection come with the risk of being too slow, or failing to find the culprit altogether. Taxonomer is a genomics-based pathogen surveillance tool that could provide the basis f ...…
 
There’s more than one good reason to get a flu shot while pregnant. Julie Shakib, D.O., M.P.H., assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Utah School of Medicine and medical director of the Well Baby and Intermediate Nursery, describes her research showing that the flu vaccine not only benefits the mom, but the baby, too. She expla ...…
 
It’s been estimated that up to half of scientific studies are irreproducible, they can’t be replicated, and this is a big problem. A new study illustrates a case in point, calling into question previous results suggesting that cancer prevents Alzheimer’s. Heidi Hanson, Ph.D., M.S., a Huntsman Cancer Institute research associate and research ass ...…
 
Mitochondria, tiny organelles within our cells, pack a big punch. They function as powerhouses that generate energy for the cell. Malfunctioning mitochondria, explains Adam Hughes, assistant professor of biochemistry at the University of Utah, impacts a number of processes, such as aging and development of disease. He describes his latest resea ...…
 
When parents of autistic teens have high expectations, they are more likely to have the skills they need to live independently, reports a study published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. The transition to adulthood can be difficult for people with autism. Suddenly, subsidized educational and social supports disappear, and t ...…
 
A randomized clinical trail led by Huntsman Cancer Institute investigators finds that a combinatorial chemotherapy reduces precancerous polyps by 75 percent in patients at high-risk for cancer. This advance represents the first prevention therapy against the leading cause of death, cancer of the small intestine, for patients with a genetic cond ...…
 
Imagine this: during a skin self-exam you notice a growth or mole that looks suspicions but you aren’t sure. You take a picture of it with your phone using a special app that allows others to vote whether or not they think you should do something about it. The next day, you wake up and learn that 38 percent of the people that looked at it you s ...…
 
Just as our immune system kicks into gear to fight off the cold or flu, it can also mount a defense against cancer, but typically isn’t strong enough to defeat it. Mingnan Chen, Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmaceutics and pharmaceutical chemistry at the University of Utah, is developing a system to boost our body’s own defenses that he anti ...…
 
Researchers have unexpectedly found that a drug that has been used for the past 50 years to treat heart failure and high blood pressure also inhibits infection by the Epstein Barr virus, which causes mono and is associated with several cancers. Lead author of the study, Sankar Swaminathan, M.D. chief of infectious disease at University of Utah ...…
 
With three sets of breast cancer screening guidelines giving conflicting sets of recommendations, it’s no wonder that patients and physicians are confused. A new study shows that adding to the confusion are the guidelines themselves. Senior author Angie Fagerlin, Ph.D. sciences says that more often than not, cancer screening guidelines either l ...…
 
It may be unsettling to realize, but roughly eight percent of our DNA is viral in origin, meaning it came from infections our ancestors battled long ago. New research published in the journal Science by University of Utah geneticists Cédric Feschotte, PhD, Nels Elde, PhD, and Edward Chuong, PhD, looks at how our bodies have repurposed the viral ...…
 
With so many tasks vying for your attention, why spend precious time sending out short 140 character Twitter messages? Sara Yeo, PhD (@sarakyeo), assistant professor of communication, explains the advantages of communicating via Twitter, who you can expect to reach, and how you can use it to your advantage.…
 
Medical advances have improved outcomes for heart attack patients, even for the sickest patients who undergo cardiogenic shock, a condition where the heart can’t pump enough blood to meet the body’s needs. Yet a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology reveals that over half of all heart attack patients either di ...…
 
For the first time, the Anticoagulation Forum has published clinical guidance statements for managing blood clots in the veins, or venous thromboembolism. Dan Witt, PharmD, Professor of Pharmacotherapy at the University of Utah, is a lead author on statements regarding warfarin management. He explains what prompted the new set of guidance state ...…
 
Older adults who are otherwise healthy are at earlier risk for death if they have low blood levels of bicarbonate, a main ingredient in baking soda. Kalani Raphael, M.D., an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Utah and nephrologist at the VA Salt Lake Health Care System, explains the surprising results of his research. ...…
 
Some estimates say that as many as half of the scientific discoveries made in certain disciplines cannot be replicated. Irreproducible research is a big problem that could be undermining credibility in science. Tom Parks, Ph.D., vice president for research at the University of Utah, describes factors that have brought us to this point, and step ...…
 
At the heart of precision medicine is taking into consideration that each person is unique. Two people with the same disease can have very different outcomes depending on their specific genetic milieu, a complication that is largely overlooked in research and therapeutics. Clement Chow, Ph.D., assistant professor of human genetics at the Univer ...…
 
Though it may be hard to get past the “ick factor”, fecal transplants—putting fecal matter from a healthy donor into a patient’s intestine—is proving to be a surprisingly effective way to treat serious infections such as Clostridium difficile. However, so far the therapy has not been as successful in treating chronic conditions such as Chron’s ...…
 
New research suggests that small changes in brain connectivity early in life may lead to big changes that contribute to autism and intellectual disabilities. The study, which explores how disruption to the gene Kirrel3 affects the developing brain, could help explain why some people with mutations in the gene develop these conditions. Megan Wil ...…
 
Results from the landmark Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) shows that a blood pressure target of 120 mmHg, lower than current guidelines, significantly reduces risk for heart failure, heart attacks and death. Implementing these findings into medical guidelines would be expected to affect at least 16.8 million Americans and co ...…
 
We’re all familiar with the power of smell: a Thanksgiving turkey roasting in the oven may lure you into the kitchen, while the stench of rotting trash can cause you to run the other way. However little is known about how odors can trigger very different neurological responses and behaviors. Matt Wachowiak, USTAR professor of neurobiology and a ...…
 
Imagine being thrown together with a group of strangers and coming up with a fundable scientific proposal in less than a week. That’s the basic nuts and bolts of the National Science Foundation Ideas Lab, a relatively new mechanism for encouraging big thinking in science and out-of-the box interdisciplinary collaborations. Interesting idea, but ...…
 
Many scientists would argue that some public policy does not reflect the current state of scientific knowledge. Arguably, some of this misrepresentation can be attributed to a disconnect between scientists and policy makers. Christy Porucznik, M.D., associate professor of family and preventive medicine at the University of Utah School of Medici ...…
 
A study led by the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah could explain why elephants rarely get cancer. Published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), the results may lead to new strategies for treating cancer in people. Pediatric oncologist Joshua Schiffman describes the research and tells the story of explo ...…
 
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