show episodes
 
Health Conscious is an independent project produced by students at Cornell University’s Sloan Program in Health Administration. We created the show with the intention of informing students as well as the wider public about important topics in health care. We aim to bring insights from renowned health leaders to curious minds everywhere. New episodes will be released just about every other week, so subscribe now for more Health Conscious.
 
Ufahamu Africa is a podcast about life and politics on the African continent, co-hosted by Kim Yi Dionne, professor of political science at the University of California, Riverside, and Rachel Beatty Riedl, professor of government at Cornell University. Each Saturday, a new episode highlights what is happening in the news, followed by an interview with a diverse thinker or innovator who is deeply ingrained in the life, culture, and politics of the continent.
 
The Cornell Real Estate Review is a student-run publication associated with the Baker Program in Real Estate at Cornell University. This podcast is focused on providing listeners with insight into the real estate industry by way of informative interviews and discussions with industry leaders. Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of real estate, The Review covers a broad range of topics including design, business economics, engineering, finance, law, planning, development, marketing, and p ...
 
Between the Vines focuses on timely viticulture, business management, and Integrated Pest Management issues to help vineyards achieve commercial success. The podcast covers timely topics and research updates throughout the year. It is brought to you by the Lake Erie Regional Grape Program. This regional Extension team is a collaboration between Penn State and Cornell University.
 
China Corner Office features conversations with the leaders who have changed the way business is done in China. Hosted by Chris Marquis from Cornell University’s Johnson College of Business the podcast shines light on the unique management models that have developed in China and what it takes to successfully run a business in China. Businesses we cover on this show span many industries, including high tech, financial services, healthcare and biotech, manufacturing and consumer products; and ...
 
Work is all around us, it defines us. The future of work impacts nearly every person on our planet. The ILR School at Cornell University is at the center of work, labor and employment – influencing policy and practice on the most pressing issues facing employees and employers. ILR School Dean Alex Colvin is the host of our series, “Work: Exploring the future of work, labor and employment,” featuring discussion with experts on key world of work topics. Web Accessibility
 
Ever wanted to know how music affects your brain, what quantum mechanics really is, or how black holes work? Do you wonder why you get emotional each time you see a certain movie, or how on earth video games are designed? Then you’ve come to the right place. Each week, Sean Carroll will host conversations with some of the most interesting thinkers in the world. From neuroscientists and engineers to authors and television producers, Sean and his guests talk about the biggest ideas in science, ...
 
The Non-Immigrant Student podcast is an audio journal of my grad-school journey in the United States of America.It is an inspirational podcast that seeks to encourage and provide guidance to other non-immigrant students across the globe on how to live their best lives while fulfilling their Study Abroad dreams. My stories reveal the hacks, tips, and tricks I have learned while on this journey and I honestly believe that ''If I can do it, you can do it too!''So excited to have you with me on ...
 
Long time NFL star and Ivy League-educated Seth Payne welcomes you to Deceptively Fast. While the podcast promises break downs and unique takes on all of the biggest sports stories, it also features a weekly episode with an expert. The experts range from authors and dieticians to comedians and scientists, offering you a taste of everything that piques Seth’s interest - including health and physical/mental fitness. On the football side, you’ll hear from current and former players, Seth’s form ...
 
B'H/Blessed is Our Creator!!! S.O.U.L. S.=Seven O.= Original/Oldest U.=Universal L.=Laws A show produced and hosted by Don Zusya Goodman, a Rabbinical College of America Graduate with a Bachelors of Arts Degree in Religious Studies has been a member of the Chabad Lubavitch Chassidic educational movement for the past 30 years. 1. Fuses Torah/Biblical Rabbinical Learning with prior secular training in radio-communications-newspaper skills. 2.T.C.I. Therapeutic Crisis Intervention formerly cert ...
 
We at Ask an Astronomer are a collection of volunteer graduate students at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY, along with David Kornreich, a professor at Ithaca College. We have a website which we have run for about a decade where we answer a variety of astronomy related questions submitted by readers. Our website is http://curious.astro.cornell.edu.
 
In The Trusted Leader Show, Global Trust Expert, Trust Expert in Residence at High Point University, Wall Street Journal bestselling author, and CEO David Horsager sits down with influential leaders from around the world to discuss their leadership style and the strategies and lessons they have learned throughout their careers. Join us as we assemble the top tactics leaders and organizations need to perform at their best and get faster results. After listening to these engaging conversations ...
 
EQ ++ is a podcast on incrementally increasing your emotional intelligence. Jamie Kalousdian and Werner Zorman will use their personal style to explain why students should examine their, and others, emotions in order to not only be more effective students but better human beings. Using specific examples from college life, college students, and leading experts at Cornell University they will dissect the what, why and how of emotional intelligence. On their journey, they will explain Daniel Go ...
 
The Aristotelian Society, founded in 1880, meets fortnightly in London to hear and discuss talks given by leading philosophers from a broad range of philosophical traditions. The papers read at the Society’s meetings are published in the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society. The mission of the Society is to make philosophy widely available to the general public, and the Aristotelian Society Podcast Series represents our latest initiative in furthering this goal. The audio podcasts of our ...
 
A few years before James E. Talmage was called to serve as an apostle for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (also known as the "Mormon" church), he gave a series of lectures at universities such as the University of Michigan and Cornell, describing the history of the Church. These lectures were later compiled and published as 'The Story of "Mormonism."' It is a concise, yet informative summary for all interested in learning the history and beliefs of the "Mormon" church. (Summa ...
 
E-commerce just turned 25 years old! In the past 25 years, technology, business, and policy have created a new world of commerce unlike anything before in human history. On this show, Cornell University economic historian Louis Hyman will narrate the rise of e-commerce through interviews with business visionaries, technology leaders, and policy makers. Through their stories, we will hear the first-hand account of how e-commerce was made and where it is going tomorrow. The History of E-commer ...
 
We are a small group of students at the Department of Food Science at Cornell University who started the podcast dedicated to summarizing, connecting new literature in Food Microbiology with current and common knowledge.Each month, our team researches primary literature, speaking with colleagues and mentors, and delving deeply into the overall body of knowledge associated with these topics.The Food Micro Minutes team members are big proponents of continuous improvement, so if you have questi ...
 
Bridging the gap….After the cap and gown. Brought to you by KensaGroup. This debut of the Bridging the Gap Podcast focuses on critical issues you face after graduation. These include how to land your first job, whether grad school should be in you plans, and if your best path toward your professional goals is to climb the corporate ladder of go off on your own. You’ll hear from almost a dozen world-class experts from the Prendismo Collection to help guide you along the way. Keith Hannon, an ...
 
Perhaps no story is as essential to get right as the history of capitalism. Nearly all of our theories about promoting progress come from how we interpret the economic changes of the last 500 years. This past decade's crises continue to remind us just how much capitalism changes, even as its basic features—wage labor, financial markets, private property, entrepreneurs—endure. While capitalism has a global history, the United States plays a special role in that story. This course will help yo ...
 
"Chroniques Sportives avec Ben et Cram" se yon podcast ayisyen ki pral focus sou spò. Nan podcast sa, yo pral diskite de gran deba kap domine spò an patikilye filozofi, istwa, ekonomi avèk nouvèl. A pwopo de Ben ak Cram: Ben se yon analis kantitatif nan konpayi donne Ameriken Nielsen. Ben gen anpil eksperyans nan media spò avèk blog entènasyonal: The False 9, Inside Spanish Football, Seri A Weekly. Sou kote lokal, Ben se youn nan 2 moun ki te kreye page spòtiv Ayisyèn "Discussion Football" e ...
 
From the Southeast Asia Program at Cornell University, the Gatty Lecture Rewind Podcast features interviews and conversations with scholars and researchers working in and around Southeast Asia, all of whom have been invited to give a Gatty Lecture at Cornell University. Conversations cover the history, politics, economics, literature, art, and cultures of the region. Interviews are hosted by graduate students at Cornell University, and podcast topics cover the many nations and peoples of Sou ...
 
Doing Translational Research explores the process of translating research findings into policy and practice and working with practitioners and policy makers to design more effective research studies. The podcast is produced by The Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research (BCTR) at Cornell University. The BCTR expands, strengthens, and speeds the connections between research, policy, and practice to enhance human development and well-being.
 
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show series
 
In this week's episode of the Gatty Lecture Rewind, Michael sits down with Vinh Pham, a PhD Candidate at Cornell University, to discuss Vinh's dissertation and work on the future of Vietnamese Francophone literature. Vinh will give a lecture at Cornell University on May 13, 2021, titled "Configuring the Future in Vietnamese Francophone: Readings of…
 
For as much as people talk about food, a good case can be made that we don’t give it the attention or respect it actually deserves. Food is central to human life, and how we go about the process of creating and consuming it — from agriculture to distribution to cooking to dining — touches the most mundane aspects of our daily routines as well as la…
 
Dr. Carolyn Day is an Associate Professor of History at Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina and specializes in British and European history and the history of medicine. In the season two finale, Dr. Day will discuss wild and mysterious medical stories from her book Consumptive Chic: A History of Beauty, Fashion, and Disease, and other r…
 
Western media accounts often suggest that China is rising inexorably as a global economic and political powerhouse. A new book by Luke Patey offers a more nuanced picture, focusing on the growing backlash against Chinese aspirations. Author Luke Patey, a senior researcher from the Danish Institute for International Studies, discusses his new book H…
 
Everyone has heard of the term "pseudoscience", typically used to describe something that looks like science, but is somehow false, misleading, or unproven. Many would be able to agree on a list of things that fall under its umbrella-- astrology, phrenology, UFOlogy, creationism, and eugenics might come to mind. But defining what makes these fields…
 
From kelly green to millennial pink, our world is graced with a richness of colors. But our human-made colors haven’t always matched nature’s kaleidoscopic array. To reach those brightest heights required millennia of remarkable innovation and a fascinating exchange of ideas between science and craft that’s allowed for the most luminous manifestati…
 
Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren’t an island, and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we’d bring in an expert about something? Email us at cgessler@gmail.com or dr.danamalone@…
 
The inside story of the world's most famous board game-a buried piece of American history with an epic scandal that continues today. The Monopolists: Obsession, Fury, and the Scandal Behind the World's Favorite Board Game (Bloomsbury, 2015) reveals the unknown story of how Monopoly came into existence, the reinvention of its history by Parker Broth…
 
Everything, in the end, comes down to Exodus. Everything that we are as a civilization goes back to Exodus. Every person, religious or not, who wants to consider him or herself educated needs to engage with Exodus. And, fortunately for us, the noted academic Leon Kass has provided us with that unique thing—a book that is both magisterial and readab…
 
The Erez Series is comprised of the Concise Guides to the full gamut of Jewish thought, from the Torah to modern halakha (Jewish law) and Mahshava (Jewish philosophy). The late Rabbi Adin Even Israel Steinsaltz zt"l was one of the leading thinkers of the modern age and the most prolific author of Jewish thought and commentary since the middle ages.…
 
Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren’t an island, and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we’d bring in an expert about something? Email us at cgessler@gmail.com or dr.danamalone@…
 
Callimachus may be the best-kept secret in all of ancient poetry. Loved and admired by later Romans and Greeks, his funny, sexy, generous, thoughtful, learned, sometimes elaborate, and always articulate lyric poems, hymns, epigrams, and short stories in verse have gone without a contemporary poetic champion, until now. In After Callimachus (Princet…
 
The "decline of the West" is once again a frequent topic of speculation. Often cited as one element of the alleged decline is the succession of prolonged and unsuccessful wars--most notably those waged in recent decades by the United States. This book by three Danish military experts examines not only the validity of the speculation but also asks w…
 
Where racism and sexism meet—an understanding of anti-Black misogyny. When Moya Bailey first coined the term misogynoir, she defined it as the ways anti-Black and misogynistic representation shape broader ideas about Black women, particularly in visual culture and digital spaces. She had no idea that the term would go viral, touching a cultural ner…
 
A brief, elegant memoir of the author's work as a Red Cross volunteer delivering emergency water to residents of Flint, Michigan, Standpipe sets the struggles of a city in crisis against the author's personal journey as his mother declines into dementia and eventual death. Written with a poet's eye for detail and quiet metaphor, Standpipe: Deliveri…
 
Louis Jacobs was Britain's most gifted Jewish scholar. A Talmudic genius, outstanding teacher and accomplished author, cultured and easy-going, he was widely expected to become Britain's next Chief Rabbi. Then controversy struck. The Chief Rabbi refused to appoint him as Principal of Jews' College, the country's premier rabbinic college. He further…
 
Now in its fifth edition, Analyzing Architecture has become internationally established as the best introduction to architecture. Aimed primarily at those wishing to become professional architects, it also offers those in disciplines related to architecture (from archaeology to stage design, garden design to installation art), a clear and accessibl…
 
Joining us this week are special guests Christina Cottiero, a political science PhD student at UC San Diego doing award-winning research on regional security issues in West Africa, and Expédit Ologou, the founder and president at the Civic Academy for Africa’s Future, an independent research think tank in Benin, and a Senior Political Governance Of…
 
Dr. Gold joins the LERGP team to kick-off the virtual coffee pot series for 2021. Dr. Gold discusses early season disease control, Gold lab research projects, and resistance management. Coffee pot meetings are live every Wednesday. Register at https://lergp.cce.cornell.edu/ for pesticide recertification credits in NY and PA. Kevin Martin (co-host) …
 
Unseasonably cold weather has slowed down the growing season. The team covers disease models and spray timing in a frost year. Also, a frost damage assessment has been complicated by partially damaged shoots in some areas. Secondary buds are well underway where frost damage was severe. Kevin Martin (co-host) Jennifer Phillips Russo (co-host) Andy M…
 
An all-American athlete, a cancer survivor, and a consultant, Chris Bordoni has experienced his share of adversity and reinvention. Now, he works with individuals and groups to help them achieve transformational change through the art of building resilience. In this episode, Chris chats about his background as an athlete, as an undergraduate at Cor…
 
Today I interview Dinty W. Moore and Zoë Bossiere, the editors of the new anthology The Best of Brevity: Twenty Groundbreaking Years of Flash Nonfiction (Rose Metal Press, 2020). The anthology brings together the best of Brevity Magazine, which publishes works of literary nonfiction that are less than 750 words. So how do you write about, say, the …
 
Doron Taussig invites us to question the American Dream. Did you earn what you have? Did everyone else? The American Dream is built on the idea that Americans end up, in our working lives, roughly where we deserve to be based on our efforts and abilities—in other words, the United States is supposed to be a meritocracy. When Americans think and tal…
 
In Impossible Stories: On the Space and Time of Black Destructive Creation (Ohio State UP, 2021), John Murillo offers bold new readings of recent and canonical Black creative works within an Afro-pessimistic framework to excavate how time, space, and blackness intersect—or, rather, crash. Building on Michelle Wright’s ideas about dislocation from t…
 
The Business of Architecture: Your Guide to a Financially Successful Firm (Routledge, 2017) is the essential guide to understanding the critical fundamentals to succeed as an architect. Written by successful architects for architects everywhere, this book shows the architecture industry from a corporate business perspective, refining the approach t…
 
There has been a resurgent global interest in the origins and formation of authoritarian regimes as many states around the world drift away from liberal democracy. Indonesia’s experiences with such an authoritarian turn in the 1950s and 1960s offers many lessons from history. In Authoritarian Modernization in Indonesia’s Early Independence Period (…
 
Simon Critchley's Tragedy, the Greeks, and Us (Vintage, 2020) does not offer a comprehensive theory of tragedy. Instead, it takes issue with the bland simplifications that philosophers have offered in place of a robust engagement with tragedies, plural. Critchley examines Nietzche's wishful speculation on the origin of tragedy, Aristotle's dry and …
 
Genocide is not only a problem of mass death, but also of how, as a relatively new idea and law, it organizes and distorts thinking about civilian destruction. Taking the normative perspective of civilian immunity from military attack, A. Dirk Moses argues that the implicit hierarchy of international criminal law, atop which sits genocide as the 'c…
 
In today’s episode, we speak with Ayesha Chaudhry about her new book, The Colour of God (Oneworld Publications, 2021). The book describes Chaudhry’s personal, spiritual, and professional journey as she navigates her life as a South Asian immigrant Muslim girl raised in Canada. Rich in its analysis of its major themes – such as patriarchy, religion,…
 
The Portrait is a story full of ambiguity and suspense, one that works on many different levels and holds the reader’s attention until the very last page. Recently published to great acclaim, the book will soon become a Sky TV mini-series. In what she called a 'beautiful' conversation with Duncan McCargo, Ilaria Bernadini explains, inter alia: why …
 
The Korean War is now America's seminal war. It was the first war conducted with the new United Nations, the first war fought against the Chinese Communists, and the first modern war the US didn't win. Louis Nelson designed the mural wall at the Korean Veterans Memorial on the Mall in Washington DC. His just published memoir, Mosaic: War Monument M…
 
In The Healing Otherness Handbook: Overcome the Trauma of Identity-Based Bullying and Find Power in Your Difference (New Harbinger, 2021), Stacee Reicherzer—a nationally known transgender psychotherapist and expert on trauma, otherness, and self-sabotage—shares her own personal story of childhood bullying, and how it inspired her to help others hea…
 
Before Winston Churchill made history, he made news. To a great extent, the news made him too. If it was his own efforts that made him a hero, it was the media that made him a celebrity - and it has been considerably responsible for perpetuating his memory and shaping his reputation in the years since his death. Discussing this topic and much more …
 
Recognizing the absence of a God named Yahweh outside of ancient Israel, this study addresses the related questions of Yahweh's origins and the biblical claim that there were Yahweh-worshipers other than the Israelite people. Beginning with the Hebrew Bible, with an exhaustive survey of ancient Near Eastern literature and inscriptions discovered by…
 
Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren’t an island, and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we’d bring in an expert about something? Email us at dr.danamalone@gmail.com or cgessler@…
 
Australia has always been multilingual. Yet English language sources have dominated political and popular discourses over the last few centuries, overshadowing the significant contribution made by other languages and cultures in shaping Australian history and identity. Professor Adrian Vickers spoke to Dr Natali Pearson about his work as part of an…
 
In her new book From Rabbit Ears to the Rabbit Hole: A Life with Television (University of Mississippi Press, 2021) TV scholar and fan Kathleen Collins reflects on how her life as a consumer of television has intersected with the cultural and technological evolution of the medium itself. In a narrative bridging television studies, memoir, and comic…
 
Cystic fibrosis was once a mysterious disease that killed infants and children. Now it could be the key to healing millions with genetic diseases of every type—from Alzheimer's and Parkinson's to diabetes and sickle cell anemia. In 1974, Joey O'Donnell was born with strange symptoms. His insatiable appetite, incessant vomiting, and a relentless cou…
 
Why do liberal great powers like the United States struggle to defeat insurgencies across the globe? In her new book, Bullets Not Ballots: Success in Counterinsurgency Warfare (Cornell University Press, 2021), Professor Jacqueline Hazelton argues that they are bringing the wrong conceptual models to the conflict. As a result, they are not just figh…
 
The scene is Turkey in the mid-to-late Seventies. A young male college student hops onto a bus. He sits next to a cute female student from his class, but before they can strike up a conversation, they see a right-wing passenger, walk up to another passenger and hit him on the head with a hammer. The young woman screams. The two students get off the…
 
Today I talked to Debbie Sorensen about her book, co-authored with Diana Hill, ACT Daily Journal: Get Unstuck and Live Fully with Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (New Harbinger, 2021). When you are faced with life’s challenges, it’s easy to lose track of what’s important, get stuck in your thoughts and emotions, and become bogged down by day-to-d…
 
Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren’t an island, and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we’d bring in an expert about something? Email us at dr.danamalone@gmail.com or cgessler@…
 
Diana Souhami talks about her new book No Modernism Without Lesbians, out 2020 with Head of Zeus books. A Sunday Times Book of the Year 2020. This is the extraordinary story of how a singular group of women in a pivotal time and place – Paris, between the wars – fostered the birth of the Modernist movement. Sylvia Beach, Bryher, Natalie Barney, and…
 
In Global Trade in the Nineteenth Century: The House of Houqua and the Canton System (Cambridge University Press, 2016), John D. Wong examines the Canton trade networks that helped to shape the modern world through the lens of the prominent Chinese merchant Houqua, whose trading network and financial connections stretched from China to India, Ameri…
 
Christians are often thought of as defending only their own religious interests in the public square. They are viewed as worrying exclusively about the erosion of their freedom to assemble and to follow their convictions, while not seeming as concerned about publicly defending the rights of Muslims, Hindus, Jews, and atheists to do the same. In Lib…
 
Cristina Beltrán has written a thoughtful and interrogating analysis of the concept of citizenship, particularly in the United States, and how the history of the United States as a country has shaped an understanding of who gets to be “belong” as a member of this society. The book, Cruelty as Citizenship: How Migrant Suffering Sustains White Democr…
 
Welcome to the May 2021 Ask Me Anything episode of Mindscape! These monthly excursions are funded by Patreon supporters (who are also the ones asking the questions). I take the large number of questions asked by Patreons, whittle them down to a more manageable size — based primarily on whether I have anything interesting to say about them, not whet…
 
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