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Best ExtraOrdinary Districts podcasts we could find (updated April 2020)
Best ExtraOrdinary Districts podcasts we could find
Updated April 2020
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Join depth psychotherapist and Jungian scholar, John Price, in an exploration of extraordinary stories and phenomena that lurk beneath the surface of normal and everyday life. Listen in as John interviews experts, dilettantes, sinners, and saints to explore their professional and personal perspective on the underlying purpose of the mysteries which lurk within the seemingly mundane nature of day-to-day life. John received his Master’s degree in clinical psychology and his Doctorate degree in ...
 
The For The People After Show recaps, reviews and discusses episodes of ABC's For The People.Show Summary: The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York — also known as the Mother Court — is the oldest district court in the nation, and the setting for the newest drama from the minds of Shonda Rhimes and Betsy Beers. Focusing on the lives and careers of the brand-new lawyers working for both the defense and the prosecution and handling some of the most high-profile an ...
 
The World Is Listening ToDAVE RABBITAre You?”Dave Rabbit”, the “Godfather Of Pirate Radio”, welcomes you to "The Rabbit Zone". So Fasten Your Seat Belts, bring your seats and tray tables to their Fully Upright Position, then bend over and Kiss Your Ass Goodbye, because the “Dave Rabbit” & “Radio First Termer” Pirate Radio Experience is an Extremely Dangerous & Bumpy Ride! Everything Here Is FREE To Enjoy & Share!DAVE RABBITLOVESJESSICA RABBITMilitary EntertainmentNetworkIn 2006, Dave Rabbit ...
 
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show series
 
Every day, people are dying from COVID-19. They are our family members, our friends, our neighbors and community members. For most, there will be no traditional funerals, memorials or burials. So how do we begin to grieve and make sense of this new reality? Also, professor and author James Shapiro tells us how Shakespeare's life and works were shap…
 
New Orleans has experienced a surge in new coronavirus cases, and the city expected to run out of hospital beds and ventilators in the coming days. Dr. Jennifer Avegno, director of the New Orleans Health Department, joins us to discuss the city's response. And, economist Mohamed El-Erian says restarting the economy after the coronavirus crisis won'…
 
This May marks 50 years since an anti-war protest in Kent, Ohio, turned deadly. We speak with Robert Giles, the editor of the Akron Beacon Journal during the protest and author of the new book, "When Truth Mattered: The Kent State Shootings 50 Years Later." Also, the coronavirus outbreak hasn't hit most rural areas as hard as urban populations. We …
 
At least 45 employees in one of Louisville's biggest health care systems have tested positive for coronavirus. We speak with Shelley Urquhart, a pulmonary and critical-care nurse practitioner who contracted the virus despite wearing all of the recommended personal protective equipment. Also, jazz pianist Ellis Marsalis passed away Wednesday at age …
 
Chris Douridas, a DJ at KCRW in Santa Monica, shares some timely hits from Willie Nelson to Diana Ross to help shake the quarantine blues away. Also, fashion designer Brandon Maxwell and his team are creating face masks and hospital gowns for health care workers fighting the coronavirus. We talk to Maxwell about creating protective wear amid the pa…
 
The White House presented data on Tuesday that projects at least 100,000 deaths due to the coronavirus if social distancing measures are continued through the summer. Epidemiologist Dr. Ali Mokdad, who was part of the team who compiled the data, joins us to discuss. And, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis continues to resist calls for a statewide stay-at-ho…
 
Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms provides an update on the situation in her city, which is under a stay-at-home order due to the coronavirus outbreak. More than 100 people have died from COVID-19 across the state of Georgia. And, many hospitals are stopping elective surgeries amid the current pandemic. Dr. David Hoyt, executive director of the Am…
 
The more than 30,000 Americans still stranded overseas because of the coronavirus are getting frustrated as the State Department mounts an unprecedented effort to help get them home. WAMU's Daniella Cheslow reports. Also, more cruise ships are pleading for somewhere to port in Florida, but so far Gov. Ron DeSantis has denied their requests, saying …
 
To help pass the time during social distancing, host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Petra Mayer of NPR Books about what she suggests we read while we're contained in Also, many Americans are feeling isolated these days as we stay home. But what impact is social distancing efforts having on people who are in addiction recovery? Vic Vela, host of new reco…
 
The cattle industry has its own name for an economic downturn: a wreck — and we are right in the middle of one. As the Texas Standard's Michael Marks reports, the coronavirus injected the cattle market with a big dose of uncertainty at just the wrong time. Also, Louisiana's overall death rate is on par with New York's, though the southern state fac…
 
Comedy theaters are among the many entertainment outlets struggling with the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Charna Halpern, owner of The iO Theater in Chicago. Also, Dr. Larry Brilliant has been on the front lines in the fight against disease for decades. He shares his thoughts on COVID-19.…
 
There's been an outcry on social media: Millenials don't think their boomer parents are taking warnings about coronavirus seriously enough. NPR's Ina Jaffe profiles a father and daughter. Also, we talk to John Lex, a truck driver for Walmart, about some of the challenges he is facing on the road due to the coronavirus, and the newfound respect he f…
 
Nearly 3.3 million people filed for unemployment last week as the coronavirus pandemic brought many industries to a standstill. We get an expert view from Diane Swonk, chief economist at Grant Thornton LLP. Also, so many people are worried about family and loved ones right now. WBUR's Anthony Brooks's mother, Esther Brooks, is in Italy — one of the…
 
Host Robin Young speaks with cellist Yo-Yo Ma about the music he's been tweeting using the hashtag #SongsOfComfort. Also, some physicians are speculating that vaping could make some young people more susceptible to the worst COVID-19 complications. Cleveland Clinic pulmonologist Dr. Humberto Choi joins us to talk about the issue.…
 
In this episode Dr. Stuart Kauffman and I discuss human population, creativity, the consequences of the exponential growth of the modern economy, consumerism and consumption: a model for overwhelming our environment, the choices “asked” of humanity within a consumerist culture, reductionism and the center of our humanity, increases of GDP and the r…
 
Parents know how important being outdoors is for their kids. But how safe is it for people to be outside right now? Dr. Anita McElroy has answers. Plus, grocery store employees are some of the workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic — putting their health at risk to keep store shelves stocked and grocery carts full. Noah Glick from K…
 
Washington Post's Yasmeen Abutaleb joins us to discuss concerns that Trump is sidelining his scientific advisers during the coronavirus crisis. Also, cooped up at home? Try birdwatching! Houston Audubon ornithologist Richard Gibbons reminds us that many birds migrating this week, many who are experiencing "zugunruhe," a German word meaning migrator…
 
Actor Jesse Eisenberg has two films coming on digital and video on demand on Friday: "Vivarium" and "Resistance." We speak to him about both movies opening during this turbulent time. Also, warehouse workers are calling on Amazon to do more to defend against the spread of coronavirus after the company confirmed its first case of COVID-19 at a wareh…
 
The Senate is getting closer to a deal on an economic relief package to deal with the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic. Democrat Sen. Jeanne Shaheen joins us to discuss. And, the reason why the coronavirus spreads so quickly is because many people don't even know they have it. Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health sciences at Colum…
 
As COVID-19 spreads in this country, people are struggling to adjust to the new rules: stand six feet apart, work from home, don't get a haircut, home school your children. Lawrence Gostin, professor of global health law at Georgetown University, joins us to discuss the balance between personal freedom and public health. Also, some medical professi…
 
At a few colleges, the answer to closed campuses has been the 'faux-memcement' — a quickly cobbled together ceremony, where garbage bags take the place of gowns, but the emotions and the sentiment are real. We talk to a senior at Olin College in Massachusetts and the dean of faculty. Also, access to broadband internet connection is vital for most A…
 
Congress is considering a $1 trillion rescue package designed to provide some relief for Americans grappling with the deepening coronavirus crisis. NPR's Susan Davis joins us to discuss what would be the third major bill passed to deal with the pandemic. And, CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield is facing criticism for the slow pace of testing for the …
 
Like many of you, I watched Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor’s TED talk back in 2008 with astonishment and excitement – so this conversation is a long time coming. Dr. Taylor’s personality is without pretense, and her gift of switching between a scientific worldview to the view of an experiencer sets her up as both an accomplished observer of the measurable a…
 
Dr. Jonathan Woodson, former assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, joins us, to discuss how the U.S. military is keeping its forces safe overseas and the role it could play in keeping Americans safe at home. And, at least 13 American journalists stand to be expelled from China in retaliation for a new limit imposed by the Trump adminis…
 
Comedian Jesse Appell's visit back to the United States from China has been prolonged indefinitely by the COVID-19 epidemic. Back in China, his comedian friend Storm Xu has been quarantined in China for the last three months — so long that he now fears going outside. Also, we talk with business owners and employees from across the country about how…
 
Researchers in Canada are working to develop treatments for COVID-19 by isolating the virus responsible for the pandemic. Arinjay Banerjee, a fellow at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, joins us to discuss. And, several California counties have ordered residents to shelter in place, except for essential travel, such as grocery shopping. KQE…
 
In an effort to slow the rate of transmission of COVID-19, many public school districts have made the decision to shut down for many weeks, including New York City, Boston and Los Angeles. Los Angeles Unified School District Superintendent Austin Beutner discusses his decision to close the nation's second-largest school district, and what it's doin…
 
Researchers are working to quickly develop a vaccine for the coronavirus. One of them is Dr. Dan Barouch, director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. And, a New York hospital CEO says the group's 23 hospitals in the state are bracing for an influx of coronavirus patients.…
 
As speculation and misinformation about coronavirus continue to spread online, host Tonya Mosely debunks some of the top myths spreading about COVID-19 with Stanford University's Dr. Seema Yasmin. Also, Parkinson's disease eventually robs its patients of their ability to move. About a million Americans have the neurological disease, and it might su…
 
This year's census will help determine how states redraw their electoral maps. At least 17 states have committed to using nonpartisan commissions or other nontraditional methods in their redistricting this year in an effort to prevent partisan gerrymandering. We talk to Jessika Shipley of Colorado's Legislative Council. Also, we explore the growth …
 
The city of Detroit will temporarily restore running water to thousands of households who have been disconnected due to unpaid bills. This action comes on the heels of public outcry that lack of water poses a serious public health threat amidst the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We talk with Dr. Abdul El-Sayed. Also, health care has become a high-risk …
 
NPR White House Correspondent Tamara Keith joins us to discuss the Trump administration's coronavirus response, including a temporary travel ban on some travelers from parts of Europe. And, the 2020 census ramps up Wednesday as the first invitations to respond online arrive in the mail. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang joins us to discuss the unique challenges …
 
JetBlue CEO Robin Hayes joins us to discuss the impact of the spread of the coronavirus on the airline industry and what steps the company is taking to overcome this latest challenge. And, with more than 10,000 cases, Italy has been hit harder by coronavirus than any country but China. Doctors in the country's northern provinces say that hospitals …
 
We speak with "Men in Black" and "Addams Family" filmmaker and writer Barry Sonnenfeld about his new memoir, "Barry Sonnenfeld Call Your Mother." Also, three major domestic airlines are cutting back on domestic and international flights as fears over the coronavirus cause bookings to plummet. Here & Now transportation analyst Seth Kaplan explains h…
 
When Duane Allman, the late lead guitarist of the Allman Brothers, played the iconic song "Layla," his Les Paul Gold Top guitar licks were the highlight. As Grant Blankenship reports, that guitar will be on stage at the 50th Allman Brothers reunion. Also, like many cities across the country, Raleigh has experienced tremendous growth. And with that …
 
U.S. stock markets jumped on Tuesday morning after President Trump announced his proposed economic stimulus package to deal with the effects of coronavirus. NPR chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley joins us for the latest. And, the public history project "All That Philly Jazz" seeks to document and preserve the jazz history of Philadelphia.…
 
Host Tonya Mosley talks with musical artist and social media sensation Marc Rebillet about his creative process and how his growing fanbase influences in the music he makes. Also, as the world reacts to the coronavirus, we take a look back at the history of pandemics and epidemics — beginning with the devastating Black Plague, through the HIV/AIDs …
 
Prep for Prep, a nonprofit education program in New York City, helps students of color attend private schools but some argue that it fails to mitigate segregation in the city's public schools. We reexamine these types of programs with The New Yorker's Vinson Cunningham. Also, a new book tells the story of Massachusetts v. EPA, a watershed case for …
 
Colleges, universities and boarding schools are trying to figure out how to best manage student travel for upcoming spring breaks. We talk to Brad Seifers, who handles emergency management at Indiana University, which is going on spring break. Also, since December, women have held slightly more non-farm payroll jobs than men. It's only the second t…
 
Climate change is accelerating the erosion of beaches around the world, according to a recent study. We talk with the lead author of the study, which found that as many as half of the world's sandy shorelines could disappear by the end of the century. Also, the U.S. now has more than 200 cases of COVID-19, public health officials confirmed on Frida…
 
New show "Zoey's Extraordinary Playlist" airs Sunday nights on NBC. Host Robin Young speaks with creator Austin Winsberg and star Jane Levy. Also, on March 4, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln tried to bind up the nation's wounds after four years of bloody civil war in his Second Inaugural Address. Edward Achorn's new book "Every Drop Of Blood: The M…
 
The journal Nature reports that a key bulwark against runaway climate change is breaking down. The study finds that tropical forests are losing their ability to absorb carbon dioxide. Daniel Grossman, supported by the Pultizer Center, has our story. Also, Bernie Sanders calls himself a democratic socialist. We talk to professor Sheri Berman about w…
 
How each of us takes in, and adapts to, the experiences of our lives create various preconceptions about the world and our place in it. Dr. Winborn, psychologist and Jungian psychoanalyst, works as a psychotherapist a vocation that he believes helps to free us from those preconceptions, or limitations to our lives. In the conversation we discuss: t…
 
Joe Biden won Super Tuesday primaries in nine of 14 states, including delegate-rich Texas, while Bernie Sanders won just four of those states, but picked up California. Michael Bloomberg quit the presidential race after winning only American Samoa. And, there are signs that Chinese airlines may be rebounding after canceling thousands of flights due…
 
Michael Bloomberg is using part of his $65 billion fortune to run for president. He started making his money betting on the power and future of computers. As NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, it transformed Wall Street. Also, a long-time battle against a proposed copper mine in southwestern Alaska has divided communities. As KUOW's John Ryan reports, the …
 
Sen. Bernie Sanders is expected to take home the most delegates of any candidate on Super Tuesday. We speak with Sanders surrogate Rep. Ro Khanna. Also, for the first time, cheetah cubs have been born by in vitro fertilization to a surrogate mother. Researchers see this as a promising step forward for the future of cheetahs. Host Jeremy Hobson spea…
 
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