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Fraunces Tavern Museum’s mission is to preserve and interpret the history of the American Revolutionary era through public education. This mission is fulfilled through the interpretation and preservation of the Museum's collections, landmarked buildings and varied public programs that serve the community. You can stand in the room where General Washington said farewell to his officers and explore seven additional galleries that focus on America's War for Independence and the preservation of ...
 
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In this lecture, recorded November 11, 2021, Nina Sankovitch presents the intimate connections between leading families of the American Revolution—the Hancock, Quincy, and Adams families—and explores the role played by such figures as John Hancock, John Adams and Abigail Smith (Adams), Josiah Quincy Junior and Dorothy Quincy (Hancock) in sparking t…
 
In this lecture, recorded September 27, 2021, author and SRNY member Ric Murphy will speak about his family genealogy, and his ancestors who fought in the American Revolution, serving in New York, Massachusetts and North Carolina regiments. Their story is covered in Ric’s book, Freedom Road, which also details Ric’s ancestors who fought in the War …
 
In honor of Fraunces Tavern Museum's Tavern Week, this special lecture celebrates Samuel Fraunces, a revolutionary tavernkeeper and Patriot during the Revolutionary War. Presented on September 13, 2021 by Special Programs and Engagement Manager Mary Tsaltas-Ottomanelli, the lecture will explore the mysteries surrounding his early life, highlight hi…
 
In this lecture, recorded August 19, 2021, Patrick O’Donnell discusses how the Marbleheaders repeatedly altered the course of events during the Revolution—from forming the elite Guard that protected General Washington to ferrying Continental forces across the Delaware River on Christmas night of 1776. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, th…
 
In this lecture, recorded July 8. 2021, author Claire Bellerjeau speaks about her new book Espionage and Enslavement in the Revolution. In January 1785, a young, enslaved woman from Oyster Bay named Elizabeth was put on board the Lucretia in New York Harbor, bound for Charleston, where she would be sold to her fifth enslaver in just 22 years. She h…
 
Why did over 600 Native Americans from dozens of nations meet in Pittsburgh? Just how bad did it smell inside the hull of a prison ship in 1776? Who was the only woman listed on the Declaration of Independence? In this lecture, recorded June 24, 2021, historical novelist Karen Chase will explore lesser-known figures, facts, and realities of the Ame…
 
In this lecture, recorded May 6, 2021, historian Mike Bunn offers the first comprehensive history of the British colony of West Florida. For a host of reasons, the colony has long been dismissed as a loyal but inconsequential fringe outpost. But the colony's history showcases a tumultuous political scene featuring a halting attempt at instituting r…
 
During the summer of 1776, patriots worked frantically to head off a British invasion from Canada. Their effort culminated in a wild three-day naval battle on Lake Champlain in northern New York. In this lecture, recorded April 22, 2021, Jack Kelly argues that, although the campaign has often been neglected by historians, its success was an importa…
 
In this lecture, recorded April 1, 2021, Michael Hattem discusses his book Past and Prologue: Politics and Memory in the American Revolution. Between the 1760s and 1800s, Americans stopped thinking of the British past as their own history and created a new historical tradition that would form the foundation of what future generations would think of…
 
In this lecture recorded March 11, 2021, Donald Johnson explores how, in the midst of British military occupation, men and women from a variety of backgrounds navigated harsh conditions, mitigated threats to their families and livelihoods, took advantage of new opportunities, and balanced precariously between revolutionary and royal attempts to sec…
 
The 16 months from the Boston Tea Party to the Battles of Lexington and Concord changed the course of American history. In this lecture, recorded on February 4, 2021, Mary Beth Norton explores what is known as the "long year" of the American Revolution, a time when once-loyal colonists began their discordant "discussions," leading to the acceptance…
 
Everyone knows about the Revolutionary War, but few know of Benjamin Franklin's secret plan to turn the northern and southern colonies against their oppressors, and how the freeing of one enslaved man, Somersett, was the catalyst for the colonies to come together against the crown. In this lecture, Phillip Goodrich discusses the little-known story …
 
By now, most everyone has heard of the hit Broadway musical Hamilton: An American Musical. In this lecture, Robert Watson examines some of the little known, intriguing aspects of the Founder's remarkable life, including his Jewish roots and hard scrabble upbringing. This talk also features a fun fact-checking of the musical and a look at the backst…
 
While historians often treat General Charles Lee as an inveterate enemy of George Washington or a great defender of American liberty, author Christian McBurney argues that neither image is wholly accurate. In this lecture, recorded October 16, 2020, McBurney will discuss his research into a more nuanced understanding of one of the Revolutionary War…
 
Preserving the Past is a digital lecture that takes a comprehensive look at the architecture, design, and history of 54 Pearl Street, one of the oldest buildings in New York City. Led by Museum historian Mary Tsaltas-Ottomanelli, the lecture explores three hundred years of the building’s history – from its early construction on some of the city’s o…
 
In March 1783, as negotiations to end the Revolution were well underway, an anonymous letter circulated through the Continental Army's camp near Newburgh, New York. It called for the officers to meet--outside the chain of command--and act boldly to strong arm Congress to deliver on their long overdue pay and desperately needed pensions. But was the…
 
What do we lose when our bars are shuttered? These can seem like frivolous spaces, but they have played an important role in American history. In this lecture, recorded September 16, 2020, Christine Sismondo explores the role of bars across the country's history, including the colonial era, Prohibition, the 1960s, and today. This lecture was held a…
 
In this lecture, recorded August 20, 2020, Phil Holland explores the many forms taken by the Black presence at this critical patriot victory, from the Black soldier who died in battle as a member of Col. Seth Warner's Continental regiment of Green Mountain Boys, to the sources of wealth that funded the New Hampshire troops at the battle.…
 
Just six months after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, George Washington and the new American Army sit on the verge of utter destruction by the banks of the Delaware River. Rather than submit to defeat, Washington and his small band of soldiers crossed the ice-choked Delaware River and attacked the Hessian garrison at Trenton, New Je…
 
In this lecture, recorded July 16, 2020, Jones examines how America's founding generation grappled with the problems posed by prisoners of war, and how this influenced the wider social and political legacies of the Revolution. As the British denied customary protections to their American captives, the revolutionary leadership wasted no time in capi…
 
In this lecture, recorded June 30, 2020, Libby McNamee discusses her historical fiction book Susanna’s Midnight Ride: The Girl Who Won the Revolutionary War. McNamee discusses her research into Susanna Bolling, the 16-year-old girl who made a heroic midnight ride to save General Lafayette from capture, paving the way for the Battle of Yorktown.…
 
In this lecture, recorded June 17, 2020, Mount Vernon Research Historian Mary Thompson offers a comprehensive account of those who served in bondage at Mount Vernon. Drawing on years of research in a wide range of sources, Thompson brings to life the lives of the enslaved while illuminating the radical change in Washington’s views on slavery and ra…
 
In this lecture, recorded May 21, 2020, Lindsay Chervinsky explores the creation of the first presidential cabinet. Washington modeled his new cabinet on the councils of war he had led as commander of the Continental Army, tinkering with its structure throughout his administration. As Washington faced an increasingly recalcitrant Congress, he came …
 
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