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Take as Directed is the podcast series of the CSIS Global Health Policy Center. It highlights important news, events, issues, and perspectives in global health policy, particularly in infectious disease, health security, and maternal, newborn, and child health. The podcast brings you commentary and perspectives from some of the leading voices in global health and CSIS Global Health Policy Center in-house experts
 
Created by Phoenix-based Scientific Technologies Corporation (http://www.stchealth.com/), the Ideas Start Here podcast will serve as an ally in the fight against vaccine-preventable disease by aiding, educating and uplifting those on the front lines through info bytes, personal stories, and qualified expert commentary.
 
Global Caveat is the podcast that explores the vast field of global health. Global health scientists Diana Klatt and Susanna Park discuss topics, such as research and fieldwork, with each other and guests to examine the connection between health and the sciences and how we have to work together for health, humanity, and the earth. Episodes are not endorsements for organizations discussed on the show. Music by Hawt Coco. Produced by Global Caveat, Inc.
 
By the year 2050 we will have 10 billion people on our planet - a sixth of whom will be in India. If we want to feed all 10 billion of us in a sustainable, healthy and just way, we need to reimagine how we source our food. Feeding ourselves cannot come at the cost of global health, worsening greenhouse gas emissions, excessive land, water and resource use, zoonotic diseases, antibiotic resistance, and needless suffering. Last season, we brought you a ringside view of the next food revolution ...
 
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show series
 
Dr. LaQuandra S. Nesbitt, Director of the DC Department of Health, returned as our guest to share her reflections. Her view of President Biden’s six-point plan? Tying vaccination to sustained employment is the next phase: mandates will bring about an uptake in vaccines. The rising emphasis on monoclonal antibodies is a “huge initiative” that brings…
 
There is a long history of protecting health care workers during conflict, beginning with an 1859 battle in Italy that gave rise to the first Geneva Convention. But there’s never been a “golden age of compliance” and health care workers continue to face considerable risk while trying to reduce human suffering in war zones. Len Rubenstein, a public …
 
For a year and a half, Johns Hopkins infectious disease doctor Kelly Gebo has been working with people who have been diagnosed with COVID-19. Gebo and a team of medical professionals triage COVID outpatients in a “pod” outside of the hospital where people diagnosed with COVID can come for convalescent plasma and care. Gebo talks about seeing patien…
 
Leadership might be fulfilling, but it is not easy: Our guests Marcia Philbin and Stephen Baker talk about some of the challenges they face as leaders and what skills and factors helped them succeed. Resources Ted talk by Carla Harris - How to find the person who can help you get ahead at work: https://www.ted.com/talks/carla_harris_how_to_find_the…
 
Tom Bollyky joined us on the occasion of our 100th episode to reflect on President Biden’s six-point re-set of US pandemic policy, unveiled September 9, and to discuss what can be done to break the deadlock over determining the origin of SARS-CoV-2. President Biden’s patience has clearly run out, and the new approach, heavily reliant on mandates, w…
 
There are over 50 million Americans who are eligible to vote but are not registered. VoteEr is an organization at the intersection of health and voting, providing kits for health care offices and ERs that help patients check their registration status or easily register via a text message code while waiting to be seen. Dr. Alister Martin, VoteER’s f…
 
In recognition of the 20th anniversary of the 9-11 terrorist attacks and the Anthrax events in the weeks that followed, Dr. Josh Sharfstein talks with Dr. Tom Inglesby of the Center for Health Security about the transformational impacts these events had on public health. They discuss what the attacks revealed about the US’s vulnerabilities, how an …
 
Stephanie Desmon talks to Dr. Stephen Patrick, a pediatrician at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Tennessee, about why the focus of COVID-19 right now needs to be kids, who have suffered mightily since the pandemic began and who are now filling up children’s hospitals as many are sickened by the Delta variant. They discuss how politicians an…
 
This year, National Suicide Prevention Week coincides with the 20th anniversary of 9-11. Amelia Noor-Oshiro, a Hopkins PhD candidate, is conducting research at the intersection of suicide prevention and Muslim Americans’ experiences with trauma, violence, and oppression. Stephanie Desmon talks with Noor-Oshiro about the importance of studying this …
 
Bloomberg Assistant Professor of American Health Tiara Willie studies the HIV epidemic among Black women in the American South, particularly among those in abusive relationships. In conversation with Dr. Josh Sharfstein, Dr. Willie discusses how to make HIV prevention a standard of care to help women by improving and expanding access to trauma-info…
 
Professor Larry Gostin joined us for a spirited conversation of where America as a country stands today, almost two years into Covid-19. Human ingenuity and scientific gains have been “astounding,” while our preparedness, in the face of such a “wily enemy,” has too often been “abysmal.” We experienced shock when the first wave that began in Wuhan l…
 
What is a microbiome? Are they helpful or are they harmful? Do they cause disease or can they cure disease? And what does diet soda have to do with them? In this episode, Dr. Joshua Sharfstein speaks to Dr. Jotham Suez from the W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology about the trillions of microorganisms that live ins…
 
We talked to Dr. Claire Chewapreecha and Dr. Kate Baker on tips on effective communication, presentation skills and how they have both adapted to the new zoom environment. Resources Ted talk by Marcus Alexander Velazquez on effective communication: https://www.ted.com/talks/marcus_alexander_velazquez_the_art_of_effective_communication_jan_2020 Forb…
 
Research shows that conservatives are significantly less likely to get a COVID vaccine than liberals. Timothy Callaghan of Texas A&M’s school of public health tells Stephanie Desmon about the impact this has right now, given the Delta variant, and the implications for the future in a country where politics and science are at odds in many circles. W…
 
This week, Stephanie Desmon and Josh Sharfstein are teaming up to talk to experts about COVID-19 vaccine mandates. Today, they look through the ethical lens with Nancy Kass, a leading ethicist at Johns Hopkins. They discuss why vaccine mandates should never be Plan A, when mandates can become critically necessary and how mandates shouldn’t be put i…
 
As pandemic-related, federal unemployment insurance is set to expire, Stephanie Desmon talks to Mallika Thomas, PhD, of Brookings Institution about its impacts, what will happen to those who remain unemployed but will no longer be eligible for weekly checks, and how the program was actually designed to keep people at home during the early days of C…
 
What goes into the decision to mandate a vaccine? Today, Dr. Joshua Sharfstein and Stephanie Desmon continue the conversation on COVID-19 vaccine mandates and speak to the senior director of infection prevention at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Lisa Maragakis, who is leading the implementation of the COVID-19 vaccine mandate at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Maragakis ex…
 
In conversation with Steve Morrison on August 3, Dr. Fauci began by laying out the $3.2b Antiviral Program for Pandemics. Its dual aims are quick and long-term wins. The optimal antiviral: a single pill, oral, that early in infection stops replication. Any solution has to be grounded in equity of access, at home and abroad; requires a massive incre…
 
Why has it come to mandates as a way to get people vaccinated against COVID-19? Stephanie Desmon and Dr. Joshua Sharfstein talk to Saad Omer, MBBS, MPH, PhD, FIDSA, director of the Yale Institute for Global Health, about vaccine hesitancy, as well as the benefits and risks of vaccine mandates.By The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
 
I am fully vaccinated with the Moderna vaccine. If I catch the delta variant will I acquire additional immunity—in addition to the immunity to the vaccination? If I received the COVID-19 vaccine and I’m now breastfeeding, will my baby receive antibodies? Do masks get less effective depending on how long they’re worn? Dr. Amesh Adalja of the Johns H…
 
Caring for Kids with COVID-19 in Florida. There are more children sick with COVID-19 in Florida today than ever before. Joseph Perno is an emergency department physician and the chief medical officer of Johns Hopkins All-Children's Hospital in St. Petersburg. He speaks to Dr. Josh Sharfstein about why the rising number of sick children has yet to c…
 
Public Health On Call producer Lindsay Smith Rogers speaks with Elinor Cleghorn, author of the book Unwell Women: Misdiagnosis and Myth in a Man-Made World. The book covers how misogyny and mythology were baked into western medicine and has attributed to gender bias on women’s health, how some of these biases remain today and what needs to be done …
 
We interview Prof. Jeffrey McDonnell, author of “Navigating an Academic Career: A Brief Guide for PhD Students, Postdocs and Early Career Faculty” on writing skills. We cover how and when to find the time to write and how this impacts your research career. Resources Jeff’s Book: Navigating an Academic Career: A Brief Guide for PhD Students, Postdoc…
 
It’s back-to-school time and the COVID-19 pandemic is still raging in many places. Stephanie Desmon talks to Keri Althoff and Elizabeth Stuart of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health about how important it is for K-12 students to get back into the classroom, how safe it is to do so right now, how to navigate masking for kids too youn…
 
"The Variants They Are A-Changin' " - Bob Dylan & SARS-CoV-2. What happens when an RNA virus meets an unevenly vaccinated planet? Tune in to our latest COVID-19 episode to find out! . . . sources . https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/variants/variant-info.html https://www.nytimes.com/article/covid-breakthrough-delta-variant.html?campaign_id=1…
 
2020 marked a historically high number of overdoses with more than 93,000 deaths in the United States. A particular risk for overdose is recent incarceration, yet few people who are incarcerated have access to effective, life-saving treatment. Dr. Brendan Saloner, talks to Dr. Josh Sharfstein on the urgency of jails and prisons providing needed car…
 
Overdose death rates in the U.S. reached record highs during the pandemic. Stephanie Desmon talks to Sika Yeboah Sampong about a recent report from the Legal Action Center about the role of emergency departments in saving lives from overdose. Clinicians can screen for and diagnose addiction, provide life-saving therapy, and refer to ongoing care. M…
 
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