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Take as Directed

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Take as Directed

CSIS Global Health Policy Center | Center for Strategic and International Studies

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Take as Directed is the podcast series of the CSIS Global Health Policy Center. It highlights important news, events, issues, and perspectives in global health policy, particularly in infectious disease, health security, and maternal, newborn, and child health. The podcast brings you commentary and perspectives from some of the leading voices in global health and CSIS Global Health Policy Center in-house experts
 
Created by Phoenix-based Scientific Technologies Corporation (http://www.stchealth.com/), the Ideas Start Here podcast will serve as an ally in the fight against vaccine-preventable disease by aiding, educating and uplifting those on the front lines through info bytes, personal stories, and qualified expert commentary.
 
By the year 2050 we will have 10 billion people on our planet - a sixth of whom will be in India. If we want to feed all 10 billion of us in a sustainable, healthy and just way, we need to reimagine how we source our food. Feeding ourselves cannot come at the cost of global health, worsening greenhouse gas emissions, excessive land, water and resource use, zoonotic diseases, antibiotic resistance, and needless suffering. Last season, we brought you a ringside view of the next food revolution ...
 
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Global Caveat

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Global Caveat

Diana Klatt & Susanna Park

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Global Caveat is the podcast that explores the vast field of global health. Global health scientists Diana Klatt and Susanna Park discuss topics, such as research and fieldwork, with each other and guests to examine the connection between health and the sciences and how we have to work together for health, humanity, and the earth. Episodes are not endorsements for organizations discussed on the show. Music by Hawt Coco. Produced by Global Caveat, Inc.
 
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In a two-part conversation that begins while facing down a tiny yet fierce migratory bird on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Refuge to a celebration on the south lawn of the White House, guest host Shelley Hearne, director of the John Hopkins Lerner Center for Public Health Advocacy, and David Kieve, president of the Environmental Defense …
 
Astronomer Andy Rivkin led the team at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory that sent a rocket into space last year to change the trajectory of an asteroid. Stephanie Desmon talks to him about how this proof of concept launch could one day aid in the ultimate public health mission: To save humans from the fate of the dinosaurs.…
 
Roughly 10 percent of long-term care workers have left their careers since the start of COVID-19. The shortage in staffing has led to nursing homes turning patients away, left caregivers at home struggling for help, and ultimately put patients at risk in the hands of workers who have been stretched thin. Tradeoffs host Dan Gorenstein talks about a …
 
As part of our series on China post-COVID-19, Chris Murray reflects on where things stand, almost two months after President Xi threw off Zero-Covid controls. A huge Covid-19 wave has likely led thus far to a million deaths. It is likely not over. Don’t expect greater Chinese government transparency on numbers. That remains a highly sensitive matte…
 
Howard Sklamberg, a former deputy commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, talks to Dr. Sharfstein about legislation passed at the end of 2022 to improve the safety of cosmetics. On the agenda for discussion: inspections, manufacturing standards, recalls, and the answer to the trivia question of whether a combination of antiperspirant…
 
Guest host Shelley Hearne, director of the Lerner Center for Public Health Advocacy, brings us eight miles above the Arctic Circle to talk with Bernadette Demientieff, council member for the Arctic Refuge Defense Council and member of the Gwichyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribe. They discuss the very real impacts of climate change on her community in their da…
 
Years of masking and distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic protected many of us from the common cold and flu, and isolation protected children from respiratory illnesses like RSV. So, why are so many kids getting sick this winter? In this episode, Stephanie Desmon talks to Dr. Mike Rose, a pediatric resident at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicin…
 
In our continued series on China post-Zero Covid, Dr. Scott Kennedy recounts the revelations from his six weeks in Beijing and Shanghai in late 2022, and reflects on what has transpired – societally, politically, medically -- since President Xi suddenly threw off the Zero-Covid controls in early December. What is the “toll” for not preparing for th…
 
After years of using a ZERO COVID strategy in China, which led to many lockdowns and economic questions, the country has dropped all COVID restrictions in recent weeks. Dr. Amesh Adalja of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security joins Stephanie Desmon to discuss what has happened in China, what the consequences are now and what they will be in…
 
Environmental health wasn’t always part of the public health portfolio but in recent years “science caught up to the obvious.” Dr. Howard Frumpkin, former head of Environmental Health Operations at the CDC and currently senior vice president at Trust for Public Land, talks with Shelley Hearne about the evidence base behind environmental impacts on …
 
Dr. Roger Mitchell, the former chief medical examiner of the District of Columbia, and current chief of pathology at Howard University speaks with Dr. Sharfstein about how deaths in custody are classified. Dr. Mitchell has observed that when it comes to understanding the reasons for these deaths, the usual rules of autopsies and death investigation…
 
As we enter the fourth year of the COVID-19 pandemic, Dr. Mike Osterholm, a leading expert from the University of Minnesota, talks to Stephanie Desmon about why hundreds of people in the U.S. continue to die each day from COVID and tens of thousands are newly hospitalized. They discuss the question he gets asked most often, “Is this pandemic ever g…
 
As 2023 opens, Yanzhong Huang, Council on Foreign Relations/Seton Hall University, kicks off our new podcast series focused on China. Over the past month, since Xi threw off Zero-Covid, China has experienced an extraordinary pace and scale of infection. “The worst is yet to come” as Lunar New Year migration rush – 200 million – spreads the virus in…
 
Our guest is Judge David Tatel, who recently took senior status on the U.S. court of appeals for the DC circuit after joining the court in 1994. He was appointed to fill the seat created by the appointment of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg to the Supreme Court. Judge Tatel speaks with Dr. Sharfstein about West Virginia v. EPA, in which the Supreme Cou…
 
In this episode, Dr. Elizabeth Letourneau, director of the Moore Center for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, speaks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about sexual abuse prevention means for youth serving organizations, and for children themselves. More about the Moore Center is here.…
 
Today, guest host Shelley Hearne, director of the Lerner Center for Public Health Advocacy talks with former EPA leader and inaugural White House National Climate Advisor Gina McCarthy about why climate change is a people and public health problem, not a planetary problem.By The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
 
A report from the Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis sheds light on disturbing instances of the Trump administration’s politicization of science during the COVID-19 public health emergency. Subcommittee member Congressman Bill Foster (D-IL) talks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about what’s in the report, how to better protect agencies like the…
 
Since the reversal of Roe v. Wade, there’s been a flurry of activity at the state levels to protect, significantly restrict, or ban abortion. Legal and public health expert Joanne Rosen returns to the podcast to talk with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about how removing the “constitutional guardrails” is playing out in courtrooms across the country, the “chi…
 
In the last episode of Season 6, Lindsay Smith Rogers talks with co-hosts Dr. Josh Sharfstein and Stephanie Desmon about 2022: how it started, what happened, and how it's going now. They reflect on the changing COVID response, listener feedback, standout episodes, notable guests, looking ahead to topics for 2023 and more. This episode was recorded …
 
Last week, hundreds of public health leaders and scholars gathered in Philadelphia for the annual Bloomberg American Health Summit and to discuss critical topics ranging from gun violence and environmental justice to food policy and preventing overdose. This special episode of Public Health On Call features three panels from the main plenary sessio…
 
Dr. Shaun Truelove, an infectious disease epidemiologist, returns to the podcast to talk with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about the latest models for the COVID-19 Scenario Modeling Hub. They discuss the possibility of another COVID surge this winter as well as what models can tell us about other respiratory diseases like flu and RSV, and factors like the f…
 
For the first time, the WHO released a report of fungal “priority pathogens” that are causing invasive diseases in humans and are becoming more prevalent and more resistant to treatment. Dr. Hatim Sati, technical leader of the report, talks with Stephanie Desmon about why fungi pose such a threat to human health, the lack of diagnostics and treatme…
 
Guest host Bilal Khan, a Johns Hopkins public health student who recently worked as an advisor to senior public health leaders in Pakistan, talks with Dr. Rabika Fatima, a Karachi-based doctor volunteering at medical relief camps near the floods, about what’s happening on the ground in the aftermath of Pakistan’s devastating floods. Organizations w…
 
Co-hosts Vince Blaser and Francesca Montalto are joined by Daren (Paul) Katigbak, a Women Deliver young leader, nurse, and public health professional in the Philippines, and Rita Akiki, a registered nurse and nursing director at Aboujaoude Hospital in Lebanon. They discuss their views on the status of vaccination efforts in their home countries of …
 
Unintentional injuries like auto and firearm accidents, drownings, and poisonings, are the leading causes of death in US children over age 1. Dr. Sadiqa Kendi, Division Chief of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at Boston Medical Center and a Bloomberg Fellow, talks with Lindsay Smith Rogers about her work on the Mass PIER project and some insights they…
 
COVID-19 infections may look different in 2022 than they did in 2020, thanks to vaccines, infection-induced immunity, and new treatments—but that doesn’t mean we can rest easy. Dr. Paul Sax, clinical director of infectious diseases at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Clinical Infectious Diseases talks with Dr. …
 
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