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Best Globalhealth podcasts we could find (updated August 2020)
Best Globalhealth podcasts we could find
Updated August 2020
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Take as Directed is the podcast series of the CSIS Global Health Policy Center. It highlights important news, events, issues, and perspectives in global health policy, particularly in infectious disease, health security, and maternal, newborn, and child health. The podcast brings you commentary and perspectives from some of the leading voices in global health and CSIS Global Health Policy Center in-house experts
 
Global Caveat is the podcast that explores the vast field of global health. Global health scientists Diana Klatt and Susanna Park discuss topics, such as research and fieldwork, with each other and guests to examine the connection between health and the sciences and how we have to work together for health, humanity, and the earth. Episodes are not endorsements for organizations discussed on the show. Music by Hawt Coco.
 
By the year 2050 we will have 10 billion people on our planet - a sixth of whom will be in India. If we want to feed all 10 billion of us in a sustainable, healthy and just way, we need to reimagine how we source our food. Feeding ourselves cannot come at the cost of global health, worsening greenhouse gas emissions, excessive land, water and resource use, zoonotic diseases, antibiotic resistance, and needless suffering. Last season, we brought you a ringside view of the next food revolution ...
 
Created by Phoenix-based Scientific Technologies Corporation (http://www.stchealth.com/), the Ideas Start Here podcast will serve as an ally in the fight against vaccine-preventable disease by aiding, educating and uplifting those on the front lines through info bytes, personal stories, and qualified expert commentary.
 
We are in a period of tremendous global change. Our public institutions are struggling with challenges like climate change, cyber-attacks, terrorism, and pandemics. Resilient World features insight and analysis about how to meet these challenges from thought leaders in fields as diverse as national security, science fiction and public health. It highlights innovative ideas about how to prepare for, manage through and bounce back from adversity – in other words, how to be resilient.
 
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COVID-19 shutdowns forced businesses into a remote work culture—many of them almost overnight. As employers contemplate how to safely bring staff back to work, they’ll need to consider the ways in which “work” itself and the role of the physical office have changed. Steve Lang, President and CEO of Dancker, a US company that designs office space, t…
 
It's been 8 months since the first case of the virus formally known as the Novel Coronavirus was found in Wuhan China. That number has grown in 8 months to over 20 Million cases. How do we escape this warped reality that is COVID-19? The answer just might be Operation Warp Speed. . . . . . . . . . . . sources https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/basics/tes…
 
What seemed like science fiction just a few decades back, is increasingly becoming a reality. Early research pioneered by NASA on how to feed astronauts in long haul missions to planets like Mars brought closed loop systems and fermented ingredients to the spotlight. These systems don’t rely on limited natural resources, and could potentially be ke…
 
How do social injustices contribute to health problems among Black Americans? Today, we look at racial disparities through the lens of kidney disease. Dr. Tanjala Purnell and Dr. Deidra Crews talk with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about a confluence of factors—including harmful experiences and societal barriers to equal housing, employment, and other opport…
 
A special episode today as Dr. Josh Sharfstein discusses Henrik Ibsen’s play, The Enemy of the People, with Dr. Leonardo Lisi, Hopkins professor and an expert in 19th century Scandinavian literature and philosophy. The play, which was written in 1882, draws parallels to the COVID-19 pandemic like the vilification of health officials whose guidance …
 
What happens at the state level can be profoundly decisive. Steve sat with Rep. Peter Welch to discuss how Vermont became such a dramatic outlier, in its quick and effective control of the coronavirus, and the actions taken to preserve those gains. The conversation quickly migrated to Vermont’s state political leadership, the predisposition to resp…
 
Dr. Mikhail “Doctor Mike” Varshavski, D.O., a board certified family medicine physician, has amassed six million subscribers on YouTube where he posts fun and engaging videos that demystify healthcare and combat misinformation. Doctor Mike talks to Dr. Josh about his “edutainment” approach to inform and engage people on health literacy, and how phy…
 
India’s Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana, or PM-JAY, was founded in 2018 as a government-funded health insurance initiative that provides free services to the poorest 40% of the population. Dr. Indu Bhushan, the Chief Executive Officer of the National Health Authority and CEO of the PM-JAY, talks with Sara Bennett about the COVID-19 pandemic in Ind…
 
Steve Morrison sat down with Dr. Beth Cameron, Vice President at the Nuclear Threat Initiative, and former senior White House official responsible for health security and bio defense, to talk through what the accelerating race for vaccines for Covid-19 means. Should we be excited and hopeful? Should we feel cautious, skeptical? Perhaps both. We sur…
 
Forty million people are at risk of eviction in the US as a result of COVID-19-related unemployment. Emily Benfer, Wake Forest law professor and co-creator of the Princeton Eviction Lab’s COVID-19 Housing Policy Scorecard, talks with Stephanie Desmon about what could be the biggest housing crisis in US history and the lasting impact this could have…
 
Smart protein, if done right, can be a big win for the planet. By now, hopefully, it is clear that foods that replace animal-sourced meat, eggs, and dairy tend to use fewer resources, do not contribute to rising greenhouse gas emissions, and diminish the risk of zoonotic diseases and antibiotic resistance. But equally exciting is the sector’s poten…
 
With resources strained and attention focused on the COVID-19 pandemic, active hurricane and wildfire seasons could add more deadly threats to the mix. Craig Fugate, the director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency in the Obama administration, talks with Stephanie Desmon about how disaster management experts are prepping shelters and crews, …
 
How close are we to a vaccine? What do efficacy trials actually entail? What are the challenges to achieving diversity in clinical trials? How long would a COVID-19 vaccine provide some level of protection? How is vaccine safety assessed? Should pregnant women be included in vaccine trials for COVID-19? Dr. Ruth Karron, one of the top vaccine exper…
 
Steve Morrison asks Marc Daalder, an incisive American reporter in New Zealand: how and why did New Zealand succeed in locking down the country, winning public support, and eliminating the virus? So, what now? Can tourists and other visitors ever return, even while the movie industry and other big earning events are exempted? How is New Zealand man…
 
Sweden’s approach to controlling the spread of COVID-19 has relied largely on providing guidance and expecting compliance. What’s gone right? What’s gone wrong? Anders Tegnell, Sweden’s chief epidemiologist, talks candidly with Dr. Josh Sharfstein. He rejects the idea that the nation has been complacent, saying the goal has always been to reduce tr…
 
Over 300 homeless youths ages 14-25 come to the Youth Empowered Society (YES) Drop-in Center every year. They come for food, clothing, mental health counseling, job training, housing and rental assistance, and many more basic services. But COVID-19 is presenting even greater challenges for clients and has forced the staff to rethink service deliver…
 
Experts are concerned about outbreaks of seasonal influenza alongside further spikes of COVID-19 infections this fall and winter as some people return to work and school. Jen Gerber, a recent PhD graduate from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, talks with Stephanie Desmon about the importance of the flu vaccine to keep people from…
 
The Beyond Meat IPO in 2019 marked an inflection point not just for the global alternative protein ecosystem but the fledgling Indian innovation ecosystem as well. Calls to offer capital, R&D and entrepreneurial talent started pouring in. But the best things take time, and building something entirely new takes much more. An innovation ecosystem tak…
 
J. Stephen Morrison, Senior Vice President and director of the CSIS Global Health Policy Center, sat down for a conversation on July 24 with Dr. Anthony Fauci, as America’s runaway crisis continued to unfold. Will a return to basics be enough, or are lockdowns in our future? Do we really have reliable science on how Covid-19 impacts children, as we…
 
In May, the mayor of Dallas appointed Dr. Kelvin Baggett as the “COVID Czar.” Now, amidst rising cases across the state, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health alum Baggett is tasked with reducing harm and suffering from COVID-19. He talks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about his work as COVID Czar, how the city is addressing disproportionate im…
 
This week, we’re checking in with guests we interviewed earlier in the pandemic. Today, Dr. Josh Sharfstein gets an update from Dr. Monica Schoch-Spana, an expert on the mental health effects of the novel coronavirus. Schoch-Spana talks about the challenges for psychological well-being caused by the resurgence of cases in the US. She also talks abo…
 
This week, we’re checking in with guests we interviewed earlier in the pandemic. Today, Dr. Josh Sharfstein gets an update from infectious disease epidemiologist Dr. Justin Lessler who was one of our very first podcast guests. Back in March, there were a lot of unanswered questions. Lessler talks about what we now know about transmission and fatali…
 
This week, we’re checking in with guests we interviewed earlier in the pandemic. Today, Stephanie Desmon gets an update from epidemiologist Dr. Chris Beyrer about the status of the pandemic in jails, prisons, and immigration detention centers. Beyrer also talks about the victories they’ve had with decarceration and releases of individuals who are h…
 
Andrew and Steve gathered with David Sanger to discuss the NYT's recent investigative team’s efforts, which chronicled the momentous White House decisions taken in early April to step back and push lead responsibility on to the states. This occurred at the same time that the President balked on any national testing strategy, refused to embrace mask…
 
This week, we’re checking in with guests we interviewed earlier in the pandemic. Today, Stephanie Desmon gets an update from Dr. Emily Gurley about contact tracing as a strategy for slowing the spread of COVID-19 and what is still needed for contact tracing to be successful in the US. Gurley also talks about a new course that will help tracers and …
 
Understanding what consumers want has been the holy grail for innovators across industries for decades. In the U.S. and other countries, products like Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods demonstrated that a huge and viable market exists for burgers made from plants for people who love their meat. In the U.S. consumers love their burgers and eat three …
 
Dr. Josh Sharfstein gets an update from Dr. Arturo Casadevall about the innovative idea of using convalescent serum from patients who have recovered from COVID-19 to help others. Since we last heard from him, Dr. Casadevall has launched a plasma project that, along with others across the US, has helped over 35,000 COVID-19 patients. Casadevall also…
 
Are people who test positive for weeks, or even months still infectious? Are face shields more effective than masks? If COVID-19 is airborne, does this mean we don’t have to be as concerned about surfaces? If a person tests positive multiple times, is each new test considered a new “case?” If you’re sick with COVID and you wear a mask, will you get…
 
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