show episodes
 
What we don’t know about American history hurts us all. Teaching Hard History begins with the long legacy of slavery and reaches through Reconstruction, Jim Crow, and the civil rights movement into the present day. Brought to you by Learning for Justice (formerly Teaching Tolerance) and hosted by Dr. Hasan Kwame Jeffries and Dr. Bethany Jay, Teaching Hard History brings us the lessons we should have learned in school through the voices of scholars and educators. It’s great advice for teacher ...
 
Noble Sissle, who lived from 1889 to 1975, participated in and witnessed some of America's great moments in history associated with culture and racial equality. Known throughout history as a music lyricist and orchestra leader, Sissle was an ambassador of goodwill for America from World War I with the renowned Harlem Hellfighters' Regimental Band to the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s to entertaining millions of military service persons with the USO in World War II to playing for presidents, ...
 
Redacted (verb): censor or obscure for legal or security purposes. [REDACTED] History is a show where we can have real, unfiltered conversations about the things that SOME FOLK don't want us to talk about. This is where we will huddle around the campfire and tell the stories of people that the textbooks forgot. Sit back, relax, and enjoy the show! If you want to support the show, come join the Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/Blackkout https://www.tiktok.com/@blackkout___ For all inquiries, ...
 
Made by the curious, for the curious, Hard Fried History (HFH) is your crash-course in everything. HFH is a hybrid comedy-history podcast that provides you with quality and responsibly-sourced information, all while dispensing a healthy dose of sugar to help the medicine go down. Hosted by Henry Price (@henryeprice) and Joshua Stokes (@joshuabstokes), two aspiring Houston entertainers, HFH focuses on lesser-studied figures, events and eras, and if not, delivers refreshing interpretations and ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
Welcome back to the [Redacted] History Podcast. I truly appreciate you being here! This week's episode is about the Harlem Hellfighters, Henry Johnson, and the Black soldier experience during World War I. This is a GOOD ONE! Introduction: (0:00) World War I Background: (0:39) Black People in the War (4:02) The Harlem Hellfighters (5:51) Henry Johns…
 
Congressman Hakeem Jeffries represents New York’s 8th congressional district. Our final episode this season takes us to the U.S. House of Representatives for a conversation between Rep. Jeffries and his brother, our host, Dr. Hasan Jeffries, to discuss the lingering effects of the Jim Crow era—including voter access, prison and policing reform and …
 
After emancipation, aspects of the legal system were reshaped to maintain control of Black lives and labor. Historian Robert T. Chase outlines the evolution of convict leasing in the prison system. And Historian Brandon T. Jett explores the commercial factors behind the transition from extra-legal lynchings to police enforcement of the color line. …
 
Welcome back to the [Redacted] History Podcast! On this week's episode we dive right back into the life of the ICONIC Josephine Baker! Show Notes: Intro and Recap: (0:00) Josephine Sails to Paris (1:14) Josephine and Her Relationship with America (3:28) World War II Starts (4:25) Josephine Becomes a Spy (7:00) Josephine Takes on Civil Rights (12:00…
 
From concertos to operas, Black composers captured the changes and challenges facing African Americans during Jim Crow. Renowned classical pianist Laura Downes is bringing new appreciation to the works of artists like Florence Price and Scott Joplin. In our final installment of Music Reconstructed, Downes discusses how we can hear the complicated h…
 
Welcome back to the [REDACTED] History Podcast, where we discuss people and events in history that your school teacher probably didn't teach you about. On this week's installment we dive into the life of Josephine Baker, a woman born into the racist midwest of America in the early 20th century who had every odd stacked against her and goes on to be…
 
When we consider the trauma of white supremacy during the Jim Crow era—what writer Ralph Ellison describes as “the brutal experience”—it’s important to understand the resilience and joy that sustained Black communities. We can experience that all through the “near-comic, near-tragic lyricism” of the blues. In part 3 of this series, acclaimed musici…
 
Black political ideologies in the early 20th century evolved against a backdrop of derogatory stereotypes and racial terrorism. Starting with Marcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Agency, historian Minkah Makalani contextualizes an era of Black intellectualism. From common goals of racial unity to fierce debates over methods, he shows h…
 
In this episode: Happy Women's History Month! I wanted to give you all an episode of a woman who inspires me and has an amazing but unknown story! This is the story of Mary Bowser, an enslaved Black woman from Virginia who gets her freedom and decides to fight back against slavery. Show Notes: Listener Thank You (0:00) Part 1 Recap and Intro (1:38)…
 
From ranches to railroads, learn about the often unrecognized role that African Americans played in the range cattle industry, as Pullman porters and in law enforcement. In part two of this special series, Grammy Award-winner Dom Flemons takes us on a musical exploration of the American West after emancipation. “The American Songster” joins histori…
 
This nation has a long history of exploiting Black Americans in the name of medicine. A practice which began with the Founding Fathers using individual enslaved persons for gruesome experimentation evolved into state-sanctioned injustices such as the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, among others. Award-winning author, historian Deirdre Cooper Owens details…
 
In this episode: Happy Women's History Month! I wanted to give you all an episode of a woman who inspires me and has an amazing but unknown story! This is the story of Mary Bowser, an enslaved Black woman from Virginia who gets her freedom and decides to fight back against slavery. Show Notes: Introduction: (0:00) Mary's Childhood (3:38) Mary Moves…
 
Welcome to the [Redacted] History Podcast! In this episode: Robert Smalls was an enslaved Black man from the shores of the Charleston Harbor in South Carolina in the mid 1800's and lived to see and fight in the Civil War. He wanted to buy his family's freedom and when he was denied, he did the impossible. Show Notes & Timestamps: Show Introduction:…
 
This is a special four-part series where historian Charles L. Hughes introduces us to musicians who are exploring the sounds, songs and stories of the Jim Crow era. In this installment, Jazz pianist Jason Moran discusses his acclaimed musical celebration of a man he calls “Big Bang of Jazz,” bandleader, arranger and composer James Reese Europe. Dur…
 
In this episode we discuss the most decorated unit of WW1: The Harlem Hellfighters, who battled the Germans and brought Jazz to Europe during the era of Jim Crow segregation. We are joined by Tre Tutson, a comedian from Texas and soon to be a national name. Remember to Like, follow and share!
 
During the Harlem Renaissance, more Black artists than ever before were asking key questions about the role of art in society. Oftentimes the Harlem Renaissance is misconstrued as a discrete moment in American history–not as the next iteration of a thriving Black artistic tradition that it was. Literature scholar Julie Buckner Armstrong urges educa…
 
On this episode we discuss The Songhai Empire and its formation under the Mali Empire, Its internal conflicts that led to dynastic changes and the Invasion of the Pasha Moor army which destroyed the empire and threw Sub Saharan West Africa into turmoil just in time for the Atlantic Slave Trade.
 
Hi, I'm André and welcome to the Redacted History Podcast. This is a show where I will be talking about people, events, and stories that the history books MAY have forgotten about, with a little slander on the side. So sit back, relax, and enjoy the ride! Follow and Support Here: https://www.patreon.com/blackkout https://www.tiktok.com/@blackkout__…
 
Henry E Price wrote this - So you wanna be a baller? Shot caller? Worship and praise in the name of Allah? (It works better if you sing it in your head, phonix not phonetics). THIS WEEK we examine the reign of Mansa Musa, primarily discussing the details of his famous Hajj to Mecca, his reasons for undertaking this venture, the actual status of his…
 
In the United States, Black athletes have had to contend with two sets of rules: those of the game and those of a racist society. While they dealt with 20th century realities of breaking the color line and the politics of respectability, Black fans, educational institutions, and the Black press were building sporting congregations with their own we…
 
Opportunities created by the New Deal were often denied to African Americans. And that legacy of exclusion to jobs, loans and services can be seen today in federal programs and policies as well as systemic inequities in housing, education, health and the accumulation of wealth. Historian Jill Watts examines the complicated history of the New Deal, …
 
U.S. involvement in world wars and the domestic Black freedom struggle shaped one another. By emphasizing the diverse stories of servicemen and women, historian Adriane Lentz-Smith situates Black soldiers as agents of American empire who were simultaneously building their own institutions at home. While white elected officials worked to systemicall…
 
Historian Tera Hunter describes Black institution-building post-slavery and throughout the Jim Crow era, illustrating how Black workers reorganized labor to their advantage, despite virulent white resistance. During the same period, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) produced future leaders while cultivating resistance to white su…
 
What did WW2-era Japan have in common with Sunny D? They both unleashed the power of the sun. THIS WEEK! In honor of the upcoming 80th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack, Josh, Henry and itinerant funny-man Tim Williams dive as deep as possible into the series of events leading up to this most infamous of days. Within, we cover topics such as t…
 
Exactly how was American Reconstruction bungled? Join us as we explore the question through the last thirty six years of Frederick Douglass' life, examining his role during the Civil War, the minor-league coup's launched during Reconstruction itself and the social causes advocated by Douglass up until the end of his life.…
 
Naming the 1921 Tulsa massacre a “race riot” is inaccurate. Historian David Krugler urges listeners to call this and other violent attacks what they were: premeditated attempts at ethnic cleansing. Decades before, African Americans moved North in record numbers during the Great Migration. Krugler delves into connections between diaspora and violenc…
 
Is your heart lighter than a feather? This week we continue our spooky streak by exploring the mythology, spirituality and religious organization of Ancient Egypt, covering topics such as the Book of the Dead, the reasons for and process of mummification and the individual Day of Judgement that awaits us once we cross that final threshold. Joined b…
 
Black American experiences during Jim Crow were deeply affected by the ever-present threat of lynching and other forms of racist violence. Historian Kidada Williams amplifies perspectives from Black families, telling stories of lynching victims obscured by white newspapers. She and Kellie Carter Jackson urge educators to confront the role of this v…
 
The Lost Cause narrative would have us believe that Confederate monuments have always been celebrated, but people have protested them since they started going up. Historian Karen Cox unpacks how the United Daughters of the Confederacy used propaganda to dominate generations of teachings about the Civil War through textbooks, legislation, and popula…
 
Just months after the Civil War ended, former Confederates had regained political footholds in Washington, D.C. In her overview of Reconstruction, Kate Masur notes how—in the face of evolving, post-slavery white supremacy—Black people claimed their citizenship and began building institutions of their own. Ahmad Ward then takes us to 1860s Mitchelvi…
 
What do you really know about Osama bin Laden? This week we look at the first 35 years of America's, if not the world's, most infamous terrorist, covering the circumstances of his birth and childhood, his service in the Soviet-Afghan war and how his radical beliefs were shaped by the events and people around him. Also covered is the US' initial rea…
 
If both your old friends and your new friends are inviting you to sit with them in your grade-school's cafeteria, which group would you sit with? This week we conclude our series on the Saudi Royal Family, covering events such as the First Persian Gulf war, the most-recent frictions caused by Saudi Arabia's attempts to modernize and the global stan…
 
Historian Ed Baptist provides context on the creation and enforcement of a U.S. racial binary that endures today, as well as Black resistance as a force for political change. And Aisha White urges educators to ask themselves, “What did you learn about race when you were younger?” before they engage with children. She argues that self-reflection and…
 
What's the difference between an Emirate and a Nation State? Emirates don't get a seat at the UN. This week we begin our analysis of the rise of Ibn Saud and the Saudi Royal Family, covering topics such as European attempts to colonize the region, Saudi Arabia's place in both World Wars and the early attempts to modernize the largest country in the…
 
People from all corners of public life are telling teachers to stop discussions about race and racism in the classroom, but keeping the truth of the world from students simply doesn’t work. English teacher Matthew Kay urges educators to create brave spaces instead. He provides examples of classroom strategies for engaging with students at the inter…
 
This season, we’re examining the century between the Civil War and the modern civil rights movement to understand how systemic racism and slavery persisted and evolved after emancipation—and how Black Americans still developed strong institutions during this time. Co-hosts Hasan Kwame Jeffries and Bethany Jay discuss how students need to grasp this…
 
Have you checked in with the enemy of your enemy? For our 100th episode special, Henry and Josh peak into the history of Afghanistan, covering the first of its approximately four decades of civil war and turmoil. Included within our analysis is the events that prompted the occupation, the nature and gradual escalation of the US support of rebel fac…
 
In 2015, Coach Steve Bandura loaded the Anderson Monarchs, a little league baseball team from Philadelphia, onto a 1947 Flxible Clipper Bus for a barnstorming tour back in time. Bandura and the players recount lessons learned while visiting historic civil rights sites, meeting veteran activists and playing baseball along the way. And historian Derr…
 
What exactly was Canada's role during World War Two? This week, Josh, Henry and Canada's own Graham Kay explore the question by tracing the itinerary of five Canadian battalions throughout Europe and how they contributed to the defeat of the Axis. Be sure to follow Graham Kay on IG and Twitter and check him out on his upcoming nationwide tour!…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2022 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login