Historical Society of the NY Courts public
[search 0]
Download the App!
show episodes
 
Loading …
show series
 
In this episode of Chatting with the Authors of Judicial Notice, Professor Mary Noé tells host Eric van der Vort, Ph.D. all about a murder committed in full view of a theatre full of witnesses in the early 20th century. The case is full of twists and turns, including escapes, extraditions, and major challenges for the courts to iron out. You won't …
  continue reading
 
Manhattan’s High Line is one of the world’s great parks, with a rich history at the crossroads of historic preservation, the law, and the great City and State of New York. In this episode of Wrecking Ball, host Adrian Untermyer welcomes Jonathan Broder, former General Counsel of the Consolidated Rail Corporation (or “Conrail”) to recount Broder’s k…
  continue reading
 
Two of the articles in Judicial Notice Issue 18, the Society’s periodical publication, feature stories from the life of Benjamin N. Cardozo, once Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals and Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. Host Eric van der Vort, Ph.D. welcomed authors Prof. John Q. Barrett and Henry "Hank" M. Greenberg, E…
  continue reading
 
Lower Manhattan's Thurgood Marshall United States Courthouse and Foley Square are now preserved and continue to define the aesthetic of justice in New York and the nation. But when the complex was still new, a greedy Chief Circuit Judge named Martin T. Manton orchestrated his campaign of judicial bribery from within the Courthouse's awe-inspiring h…
  continue reading
 
In the premiere episode of Wrecking Ball — a new series featuring tales of preservation, the law, and the places New Yorkers love — host Adrian Untermyer welcomes author-historians Christina Greer and Anthony C. Wood to tell the raucous story of how ordinary people pulled together to craft New York City’s Landmarks Law, which safeguards historic bu…
  continue reading
 
In the rough-and-tumble New York of a century and a half ago, enterprising lawyers like Paul Cravath and Samuel Untermyer invented the modern practice of corporate law – all while dastardly crooks grabbed headlines and forced innovations among the police who pursued them and the attorneys who prosecuted them. Author John Oller, Esq. spent years res…
  continue reading
 
This conversation with Henry M. Greenberg, Esq. and Hon. Albert M. Rosenblatt chronicles the steps then-Chief Judge Judith S. Kaye and Judge Rosenblatt took to create a historical society honoring the courts of the state of New York. From the moments that inspired its creation in the late 1990s to its ultimate inception in 2002 and beyond, learn ab…
  continue reading
 
The late M. Dolores Denman was a true judicial trailblazer; among her feats, she was the first woman appointed as Presiding Justice of any Appellate Division Department. In this special episode of the Judicial Notice Podcast, host Hon. Helen E. Freedman gathers three of Judge Denman's colleagues and friends — Judge Richard C. Wesley, now of the Sec…
  continue reading
 
In this episode, attorney and urbanist Adrian Untermyer discusses George McAneny’s sprawling legal legacy with historian Lucie Levine and preservationist Brad Vogel, Esq. George McAneny is sometimes called “the most influential New Yorker you never heard of.” Over decades of civic activism, McAneny had an incalculable impact on planning, zoning, an…
  continue reading
 
Host William H. Hinrichs chats with the Historical Society of the New York Courts’ most recent Judith S. Kaye Teaching Fellow Lauren DesRosiers on her experience teaching the course American Immigration and New York State to high schoolers in the Queens and Lower East Side Bard High School Early College campuses. Bill and Lauren discuss the unique …
  continue reading
 
In this episode, host David L. Goodwin talks with Paul DeForest Hicks about the incredible influence of Connecticut's Litchfield Law School on the bench and bar of New York State at the founding of the nation, and how Litchfield paved the way for Harvard, Yale, Columbia, and other leading law schools of today. Paul DeForest Hicks is the author of T…
  continue reading
 
Chris Kwok talks with Hon. Randall T. Eng about his remarkable life and career, marked by a series of firsts for the Asian American community. They reminisce about Judge Eng’s early days in Queens and China, how he became interested in the law, his rise in the legal profession to become the first Asian American Judge in all of New York State, and h…
  continue reading
 
Hon. Randall T. Eng and Hon. Lillian Wan share their personal experiences as Asian American judges overcoming challenges, and provide advice to Asian American attorneys on how they too can bridge the gap. Judge Wan is a Kings County Supreme Court Civil Term Judge and member of the Society’s Board of Trustees. Judge Eng is former Presiding Justice o…
  continue reading
 
In the United States Supreme Court, it's nine. In the United States Courts of Appeals, it's three. And in New York's Appellate Division, Second Department it's . . . four? Presiding Justice Alan D. Scheinkman talks about his article, adapted for Judicial Notice, which explores how the four-Justice appellate panel became the norm in the Second Depar…
  continue reading
 
Director of Bard College Institute for Writing and Thinking Dr. Erica Kaufman and Dean of Bard Early Colleges John Weinstein discuss the teacher and student initiatives we partner together to produce, including teacher workshops, the Harlem Law Program, and the Judith S. Kaye Teaching Fellowship, and the rich resources the Society provides. Erica a…
  continue reading
 
Host Daniel F. Loud, a student at Columbia Law School, chats with Hon. Robert S. Smith, retired judge of the New York Court of Appeals, head of the appellate practice at Friedman Kaplan Seiler & Adelman LLP, and former professor at both Columbia Law School and the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, about his article in the Society’s journal Judicia…
  continue reading
 
William H. Hinrichs, Dean of Academic Life at Bard Early Colleges, speaks with Aaron Welt on his experience as the Judith S. Kaye Teaching Fellow at Bard High School Early College in Queens and Manhattan over the past three semesters. They chat about the importance of the Society’s grant to facilitate these civics courses that focus on the legal hi…
  continue reading
 
In this episode, Aisha Williams, National Director of School Culture, Great Oaks Charter Schools and a former NYC school leader of a Society partner school, chats with Jehan Senai Worthy about her experience as the Judith S. Kaye Teaching Fellow for the Society’s inaugural Harlem Law Program. The discussion delves into the successes and challenges …
  continue reading
 
Host Jacob Y. Chen, Partner at Dai & Associates, P.C., talks with Hon. Doris Ling-Cohan, a justice of the New York State Supreme Court currently assigned to the Appellate Term, First Department, about her experience as a pioneering Asian American judge in New York, and the challenges — and flat out racism — she faced on the road to and during her j…
  continue reading
 
Historical Society of the New York Courts Trustees Dennis E. Glazer and Hon. Albert M. Rosenblatt trace New York’s relationship with slavery from the early days of the colony to the climate of the nation leading up to the Civil War. The episode culminates with an investigation into the Lemmon Slave Case itself. Affirmed by the Court of Appeals in 1…
  continue reading
 
Host David L. Goodwin chats with Robert Pigott, general counsel of Phipps Houses, about his Judicial Notice profiles of Elihu Root and William M. Evarts, both national figures and prominent New York lawyers—one mostly remembered (Root) and one largely forgotten (Evarts). A native New Yorker himself, Bob discusses the spark that ignited his interest…
  continue reading
 
Before he was a Founding Father, Framer, Justice, or international diplomat, John Jay spent seven years in the trenches as one of New York's few practicing lawyers—appearing in court, collecting on debts, and working with clients. Host David L. Goodwin talks with Hon. Mark C. Dillon, Associate Justice of the NYS Supreme Court Appellate Division, Se…
  continue reading
 
David L. Goodwin, current member of the Board of Trustees of the Historical Society of the New York Courts, chats with Founder & President Emeritus of the Society — and Former Associate Judge of the New York State Court of Appeals — Hon. Albert M. Rosenblatt about the importance of the preservation of court records, and how we have tragically lost …
  continue reading
 
Professional genealogist and private investigator Alvie Davidson joins Jane today to talk about freemasonry and masonic records. Alvie, a Master Mason and 32nd Degree Mason (also known as Scottish Rite), will explain what freemasonry is and its history abroad and in the U.S. Alvie will discuss what types of records were created by masonic lodges an…
  continue reading
 
Jim Folts, head of researcher services at the NY State Archives in Albany, joins Jane today to talk about the NY Supreme Court of Judicature and the NY Court of Chancery and their records. Find out the history of the courts, what types of court records the state archives holds, what we can find in the records that are important for genealogists and…
  continue reading
 
The Legal Genealogist Judy Russell and the Ulster County, NY, Commissioner of Jurors Paul O'Neill join Jane to talk about jurors in relation to our ancestors and to ourselves. We'll find out the history of jurors and how the system was brought to North America. Judy and Paul will also talk about what the role of jurors was historically, what court …
  continue reading
 
Today Jackie Graziano, archivist at the Westchester County Archives, and Patrick Raftery, librarian for the Westchester County Historical Society, join Jane to talk about the unique collections that each repository holds. With both located in the same building in Elmsford, NY, the archives holds county government records and the historical society …
  continue reading
 
Author William Dollarhide joins Jane today to talk about his latest books -- a three-volume set titled Census Substitutes & State Census Records by Family Roots Publishing Co. Bill will talk about the history of state censuses and what information we might find in them. He'll also tell what types of records he included in the books as substitutes a…
  continue reading
 
Thom Reed, Senior Marketing Manager at FamilySearch International, joins Jane today to talk about the Freedmen's Bureau records and the recently launched database and digital images for the records on FamilySearch. Thom will discuss the history of the Bureau of Refugees, Freemen, and Abandoned Lands a.k.a. Freedmen's Bureau which was established in…
  continue reading
 
Dr. Richard Haberstroh, author of German Churches in Metropolitan New York: A Research Guide, joins Jane to talk about Germans in the New York City metro area. Find out the history of Germans in NYC, why they came, where they settled, and what churches they organized. Richard will talk about his book and give some tips on researching our German anc…
  continue reading
 
Professional genealogist Angela Walton-Raji, author of Black Indian Genealogy Research: African-American Ancestors Among the Five Civilized Tribes, joins Jane this week to talk about the African American slaves of the Cherokees, Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks and Seminoles -- the Five Civilized Tribes. More than 20,000 enslaved people walked the Trai…
  continue reading
 
Michael Perazzini, Senior Interpreter at Johnson Hall State Historic Site at Johnstown in Fulton County, joins Jane to talk about the 18th century history of the Mohawk Valley, with a focus on Sir William Johnson's role in the Mohawk Valley, his Mohawk consort Molly Brant, the Iroquois and early European settlers in the Valley, and their experience…
  continue reading
 
Author, blogger and speaker Lisa Alzo joins Jane to talk about researching Eastern European ancestors. Find out which groups are considered to be Eastern Europeans and where they came from in Europe. Lisa will give a brief history of our Eastern Europeans -- explaining what their lives were like in Europe and why they emigrated to the U.S. We'll al…
  continue reading
 
Note: The show is about 1.75 hours. Listen in one sitting or listen in shifts -- but listen. It's a fascinating show! Professor Laurence M. Hauptman joins Jane today to discuss the history of the Iroquois Confederacy in Central and Western New York and his latest book, An Oneida Indian in Foreign Waters: The Life of Chief Chapman Scanandoah 1870-19…
  continue reading
 
Beth Hessel, Executive Director of the Presbyterian Historical Society in Philadelphia, joins Jane today to talk about the Presbyterian Historical Society (PHS). Beth will give a brief overview of the history of Prebyterianism and how it made its way to the U.S. She'll also tell us about the types of records that were created by Presbyterian church…
  continue reading
 
Town historians are unique to the state of New York. Today Jane interviews Rhinebeck Town Historian Nancy Kelly and Brookhaven Town Historian Barbara Russell. We'll find out what town historians do and how they can be a resource for genealogy research. We'll talk about the state mandate for town historians -- which does not include genealogy -- and…
  continue reading
 
Professional genealogists Billie Stone Fogarty and her son Rick Fogarty join Jane today to talk about researching the Five Civilized Nations. Billie and Rick will tell the history of the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek and Seminole tribes in the Southeastern U.S. and their removal to Oklahoma in the early decades of the 1800s. Find out how Bill…
  continue reading
 
Pamela J. Vittorio joins Jane today to talk about the Erie Canal, its upcoming bicentennial and the records that were created. Pamela will give a brief history of the canal and then tell us what documents we can use to research our ancestors who were involved in one way or another on the Erie Canal -- to the builders, the boat captains, the canal w…
  continue reading
 
Keith Erekson, Director of the LDS Church History Library, joins Jane to talk about the history of the early Latter-day Saint church a.k.a. Mormon church from its beginnings in NY to the migration west through Ohio, Missouri, Illinois and then Utah. Keith will also tell about the handcart pioneers and the migration from California. We'll find out w…
  continue reading
 
Old Fulton New York Post Cards website creator Tom Tryniski joins Jane to talk about his work on the site. Find out why Tom started Old Fulton Post Cards, what goes on behind the scenes and what his plans are for the future. He'll also tell us how he decides what material to include and how best to use the site. http://fultonhistory.com/ Donations:…
  continue reading
 
Live from Fort Wayne, IN, today Jane interviews Curt Witcher, Genealogy Center Manager of the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne. Having one of the largest genealogy research collections in the world, the ACPL is known for its work with PERSI, the Periodical Source Index. Find out what the ACPL collection holds -- including its special colle…
  continue reading
 
D. Joshua Taylor, new president of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society and host of The Genealogy Roadshow, joins Jane to talk about the NYG&B's new strategic plan. Josh will tell us how it was developed and what new initiatives are in the works for the society and its members. Josh will also talk about his experiences as host of the …
  continue reading
 
Genetic genealogy educators and bloggers Blaine T. Bettinger, Ph.D., JD, and Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, CGL, the authors of the new book Genetic Genealogy in Practice published by the National Genealogical Society, join Jane to talk about the book. Find out the scope of the book, what was not included, and how we can apply the contents of the book to…
  continue reading
 
Professional genealogist Gordon Remington joins Jane to talk about New York probate records and his book New York State Probate Records: A Genealogist's Guide to Testate and Intestate Records," published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society. Gordon will give an overview of probate history in NY, tell us what records were generated in th…
  continue reading
 
Helen V. Smith joins Jane today to talk about her latest book, Google: The Genealogist's Friend, and another of her books, Death Certificates and Archaic Medical Terms, both Unlock the Past guide books. Find out how Google can help genealogists. Helen will discuss a number of Google applications that are featured in her book. She'll also talk about…
  continue reading
 
Frank J. Doherty, author of The Settlers of the Beekman Patent (published by the New England Historic Genealogical Society), joins Jane to talk about his multi-volume series. Find out the history of the Beekman Patent in Dutchess County, NY; who settled there, and what inspired Frank to undertake this huge project. Among other things Frank will tal…
  continue reading
 
Judy Russell, the Legal Genealogist, and Robert Charles Anderson, Director of the Great Migration Studies, join Jane to talk about plagiarism and fabrication in genealogy. We may be stepping on genealogical land mines in our research resources if we come upon word-for-word copying of another's work (plagiarism) and works that make up facts (fabrica…
  continue reading
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide