History Of Ancient Greece public
[search 0]
More

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Discover ancient Egypt, in their own words. This podcast uses ancient texts and archaeology to uncover the lost world of the Nile Valley. A tale of pharaohs, pyramids, gods, and people. The show is written by a trained Egyptologist and uses detailed, up-to-date research. We dive deep into the ancient society, to uncover their fascinating tales. A member of the Agora Podcast Network. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
New episodes come out Thursdays for free, with 1-week early access for Wondery+ subscribers. Everywhere around us are echoes of the past. Those echoes define the boundaries of states and countries, how we pray and how we fight. They determine what money we spend and how we earn it at work, what language we speak and how we raise our children. From Wondery, host Patrick Wyman, PhD (“Fall Of Rome”) helps us understand our world and how it got to be the way it is.
 
The podcast that transports you to the ancient world and back, with some good conversation along the way. It's not just about ancient Greece. It's about a huge chunk of human history that the Greek texts give us access to: from Egypt and Babylon, to Persia, to Carthage and Rome, we'll sail the wine-dark sea of history with some expert guides at the helm. Topics will include archaeology, literature, and philosophy. New episode every month.
 
A podcast about the history of ancient Greece for people new to and familiar with Ancient Greek history.The Casting Through Ancient Greece podcast will focus on telling the story of Ancient Greece starting from the pre history through Archaic Greece, Classical Greece and up to the Hellenistic period. Featured throughout the podcast series will be Major events such as the Greek and Persian wars, The Peloponnesian war and Alexander the Greats war against Persia. www.castingthroughancientgreece ...
 
EconTalk: Conversations for the Curious is an award-winning weekly podcast hosted by Russ Roberts of Shalem College in Jerusalem and Stanford's Hoover Institution. The eclectic guest list includes authors, doctors, psychologists, historians, philosophers, economists, and more. Learn how the health care system really works, the serenity that comes from humility, the challenge of interpreting data, how potato chips are made, what it's like to run an upscale Manhattan restaurant, what caused th ...
 
I'm Cullen Burke, and this is Cauldron - A Military History Podcast. I'll cover the significant battles in history, breaking down the vital players, weapons, methods, events, and outcomes. Let’s take a peek into the past and see what, if anything, can be learned from the most dramatic moments in our collective story. Let’s get stuck in!
 
A fast-moving history of the western world from the ancient world to the present day. Examine how the emergence of the western world as a global dominant power was not something that should ever have been taken for granted. This podcast traces the development of western civilization starting in the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome, past the collapse of the Western Roman Empire into the Dark Ages, and then follows European and, ultimately, American history as the western world moved ...
 
The most entertaining and enraging stories from mythology told casually, contemporarily, and (let's be honest) sarcastically. Greek and Roman gods did some pretty weird (and awful) things. Liv focuses on Greek and Roman mythology's (mis)treatment of women, the wild things the gods did, and the all around incredible minds of the ancient world. Gods, goddesses, heroes, monsters, and everything in between. Regular episodes every Tuesday, conversations with authors and scholars or readings of an ...
 
The History of Ancient Greece Podcast is a deep-dive into one of the most influential and fundamental civilization in world history. Hosted by philhellene Ryan Stitt, THOAG spans over two millennia. From the Bronze Age to the Archaic Period, from Classical Greece to the Hellenistic kingdoms, and finally to the Roman conquest, this podcast will tell the history of a fundamental civilization by bringing to life the fascinating stories of all the ancient sources and scholarly interpretations of ...
 
ANTIQUITAS: Leaders and Legends of the Ancient World, tells the stories of the deeds, crimes, miseries, and glories of the great men and women of Greece and Rome (and beyond). Your host is bestselling historian Barry Strauss.
 
The most influential biographies ever written, admired by leaders, creators, soldiers, and thinkers for nearly 2,000 years: Plutarch’s Parallel lives. Essential listening for anyone striving after greatness. Alex Petkas, former professor of ancient philosophy and history, revives and dramatically retells these unforgettable stories for modern audiences. The subjects are statesmen, generals, orators, and founders; pious and profane, stoics and hedonists. The stakes bear on the future of Weste ...
 
A podcast tracing the development of theatre from ancient Greece to the present day through the places and people who made theatre happen. More than just dates and lists of plays we'll learn about the social. political and historical context that fostered the creation of dramatic art. This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy
 
Some of the greatest stories buried in the folds of history...until now. A podcast that uncovers the lifetimes and achievements of prolific warlords from ancient and medieval times. Going beyond the mainstream historical figures that everyone is familiar with, providing a thorough account of lesser known warriors and leaders that were titans during their respective ages. If you would like to support my work directly, you can kindly do so here: www.patreon.com/warlordsofhistory
 
A unique view of mythology ... Imagine: Ancient Greek gods in the modern world ... Were the Greek gods no more than myths? Modern scholars say so. What if they're wrong? ... Join best selling author and mythologist Patrick Garner as he explores each of the major Greek gods--Zeus, Apollo, Artemis, Aphrodite, Athena, Poseidon, Ares and many others--and offers rare insights into who these divine beings were--and what became of them ... LIKE TO LISTEN? COMPELLING NEW STORIES ABOUT THE GODS ARE A ...
 
Survive the Jive podcast is about history and ancient religions and folklore. Hosted by historian Thomas Rowsell who is also a documentary film maker, this podcast focuses mainly on Indo-European cultures and most specifically on Germanic/Norse paganism. The podcast takes a holistic approach to programming that informs, educates and improves us. It sometimes covers scientific topics but is mainly concerned with pre-Christian religions of Europe. Sometimes the podcasts are based on videos fro ...
 
Is it a movie podcast? Is it a history podcast? Is it an unholy union of the two? Short answer: yes! Each episode, hosts Colin MacCormack, Elijah Fleming and Christie Vogler break down a new movie about Greece, Rome or the wider ancient world and what works (or doesn’t work) about them. But this isn’t a podcast for nitpicking historical inaccuracies. Rather, it’s a chance to get hot takes on Hollywood films from professional nerds/academics and take a closer look at the relation between our ...
 
Discover the incredible stories behind the Olympic and Paralympic Games — from the epic and inspirational — to the bizarre and controversial. Starting with the OG (aka Original Games) Olympics in ancient Greece to today’s sprawling sports spectacle, each episode is dedicated to telling the story of the Games and Athletes that have shaped both sports history and history history. So raise the flag, light the cauldron, and join in on the Games Odyssey for a weekly sprint down history lane as ho ...
 
The “Ancient Weirdness with Gunnar Hauser” podcast is an exploration of obscure people, events, and ideas from ancient history. It will entertain, intrigue, frighten, and amaze you. We will examine tales of ghosts, vampires and other undead, insane generals and philosophers, heroes and cult leaders, athletes and artists, accounts of dreams, and much more. We will cover stories that specialists have known about for a long time, but they are mostly unknown to the general public and you probabl ...
 
Imagine yourself dining with Socrates, Plato, or Pythagoras... maybe even Cicero and Julius Caesar...being a soldier marching with Alexander's the Great army in the vast Persian empire discovering new foods... or try and picture the richness of fruits and vegetables in the lush Hanging Gardens of Babylon...what foods did our ancestors ate? How did all begin? Why am I so hooked on ancient recipes and ingredients? Is the food delicious? Wholesome? Do you need to know? I think so! Recipes, ingr ...
 
I will describe to some extent how each battle was won or lost by particular decisions, tactics, technology or fortune. But the aim of each main narrative will be to place each battle in the context of the overall history of Europe. This overarching view provides a framework, which will help fit specific places and events into the big picture.
 
Plutarch’s Greeks and Romans is a bi-weekly podcast inspired by Plutarch’s ancient collection of biographies of famous Grecians and Romans. Plutarch was both a Greek and a Roman citizen living during the Pax Romana - the Golden Age of the Roman Empire. Our podcast will explore 50 persons Plutarch believed were most influential in the rise of Greek and Roman civilization, from legends such as Theseus and Romulus to conquerors like Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar, Plutarch had no shortag ...
 
R
Ravages

1
Ravages

Nicholas Orwin

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
The Ravages history podcast focuses on military history, from the wars of Ancient Greece and Rome to the battlefields of the Second World War. As well as this focus, it will also spotlight important events and individuals throughout history.
 
Loading …
show series
 
The Crown Games were the apex of competition in ancient Greece. Along with prestigious athletic contests in honor of Zeus at Olympia, they comprised the Pythian Games for Apollo at Delphi, the Isthmian Games for Poseidon, and the Nemean Games, sacred to Zeus. For over nine hundred years, the Greeks celebrated these athletic and religious festivals,…
 
Check out Casting Through Ancient Greece, a chronological deep dive on the world of the Aegean. From the earliest ages, through epic tales and archaeological discovery, Casting Greece takes you on a wonderful journey. Enjoy this teaser trailer, from a recent episode. And learn more at https://castingthroughancientgreece.com/ and https://twitter.com…
 
Please sit back and enjoy this extended podcast recommendation, an Introduction to the History of Egypt Podcast where Dominic will share a short tale with you. If you haven't yet come across the History of Egypt Podcast you can find Dominic's show at the below links: The History of Egypt Podcast website iTunes Spotify Twitter Facebook Support the s…
 
Having finished with Martin Luther, we now shift our gaze to the Swiss Confederation, Zurich, and Ulrich Zwingli. Zwingli is another of our early reformers. His efforts in Zurich took place around the same time as Luther though the men, while both opposed to Rome, did not see eye to eye on much else. Yet, like Luther, Zwingli began his career withi…
 
Sixteenth Street NW in Washington, DC, has been called the Avenue of the Presidents, Executive Avenue, and the Avenue of Churches. From the front door of the White House, this north-south artery runs through the middle of the District and extends just past its border with Maryland. The street is as central to the cityscape as it is to DC's history …
 
Alice Dailey’s How to Do Things with Dead People: History, Technology, and Temporality from Shakespeare to Warhol (Cornell University Press, 2022) is an exploration of Shakespeare’s chronicle plays through the theoretical rubric of modern technology. Dailey is Professor of English at Villanova University and is the author of the monograph The Engli…
 
Olga Bertelsen’s timely book, In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine’s Intelligentsia in the 1960s-1970s (Lexington Books, 2022), focuses on the generation of the sixties and seventies in Kharkiv, Soviet Ukraine—a milieu of writers who lived through the Thaw and the processes of de-Stalinization and re-Stalinization. Special attention is paid to KGB …
 
In the early twentieth century, Khunu Lama journeyed across Tibet and India, meeting Buddhist masters while sometimes living, so his students say, on cold porridge and water. Yet this elusive wandering renunciant became a revered teacher of the Fourteenth Dalai Lama. At Khunu Lama’s death in 1977, he was mourned by Himalayan nuns, Tibetan lamas, an…
 
Elizabeth Oyler and Katherine Saltzman-Li's book Cultural Imprints: War and Memory in the Samurai Age (Cornell UP, 2022) draws on literary works, artifacts, performing arts, and documents that were created by or about the samurai to examine individual "imprints," traces holding specifically grounded historical meanings that persist through time. Th…
 
In Frontier Religion: The Mormon-American Contest for the Meaning of America, 1857-1907 (U Utah Press, 2019) Konden Smith Hansen examines the dramatic influence these perceptions of the frontier had on Mormonism and other religions in America. Endeavoring to better understand the sway of the frontier on religion in the United States, this book foll…
 
Defections from the People’s Republic of China (PRC) were an important part of the narrative of the Republic of China (ROC) in Taiwan during the Cold War, but their stories have previously barely been told, less still examined, in English. During the 1960s, 70s and 80s, the ROC government paid much special attention to these anti-communist heroes (…
 
Liv reads the Shield of Heracles, attributed to Hesiod, translated by Hugh Evelyn White. A battle between Heracles and Cycnus, son of Ares, but really just a nice description of a shield made by Hephaestus. This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's a reading of an ancient source, audiobook style. For regular episodes look for any that do…
 
I wanted to do an episode that focused on Rome in the same sort of format I had done with my past Greek Periphery episodes. Though, my knowledge on Roman history is quite rusty at best, so I wanted to enlist some help to present this episode. For this I turned to Dr Fiona Radford and Dr Peta Greenfield from the Partial Historians podcast. Unfortuna…
 
Murray answers this question sent in from Christoper, 'do the sources tell us anything about the Spartan warrior Arimnestus who threw the rock that killed Mardonius? I am curious if we know if he survived the battle and if he would have been honoured for his efforts in the victory?' Patreon: patreon.com/ancientwarfarepodcast…
 
The Crown Games were the apex of competition in ancient Greece. Along with prestigious athletic contests in honor of Zeus at Olympia, they comprised the Pythian Games for Apollo at Delphi, the Isthmian Games for Poseidon, and the Nemean Games, sacred to Zeus. For over nine hundred years, the Greeks celebrated these athletic and religious festivals,…
 
Emma Natalya Stein's book Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples (Amsterdam UP, 2021) traces the emergence of the South Indian city of Kanchi as a major royal capital and multireligious pilgrimage destination during the era of the Pallava and Chola dynasties (circa seventh through thirteenth centuries). It presents the first-ever comprehensi…
 
Since the original airing of this episode in June 2021, Roger Reeves' second book Error! Hyperlink reference not valid. was published by W.W. Norton, and the paperback edition of David Ferry's translation of The Aeneid was published by the University of Chicago Press. The underworld, that repository of the Shades of the Dead, gets a lot of traffic …
 
Emma Natalya Stein's book Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples (Amsterdam UP, 2021) traces the emergence of the South Indian city of Kanchi as a major royal capital and multireligious pilgrimage destination during the era of the Pallava and Chola dynasties (circa seventh through thirteenth centuries). It presents the first-ever comprehensi…
 
The Crown Games were the apex of competition in ancient Greece. Along with prestigious athletic contests in honor of Zeus at Olympia, they comprised the Pythian Games for Apollo at Delphi, the Isthmian Games for Poseidon, and the Nemean Games, sacred to Zeus. For over nine hundred years, the Greeks celebrated these athletic and religious festivals,…
 
Today we are joined by Dr. Shannon Walsh, Associate Professor of Theatre History, and author of Eugenics and Physical Culture Performance in the Progressive Era: Watch Whiteness Workout (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020). In our conversation, we discussed the origins of women’s physical culture in the United States, the role that physical culture reformers…
 
Emma Natalya Stein's book Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples (Amsterdam UP, 2021) traces the emergence of the South Indian city of Kanchi as a major royal capital and multireligious pilgrimage destination during the era of the Pallava and Chola dynasties (circa seventh through thirteenth centuries). It presents the first-ever comprehensi…
 
Corey Byrnes’ Fixing Landscape: A Techno-Poetic History of China’s Three Gorges (Columbia University Press, 2019) is a work of considerable historical and disciplinary depth. Byrnes brings together the Tang dynasty poetry of Du Fu, Song travel writing about the same, late Qing cartographic ventures, texts written by Western travelers in the 19th an…
 
The arid shoreline between the Andes Mountains and the Pacific seems like an unlikely place to host one of the world's earliest complex societies. But more than 5,000 years ago, the people of the Norte Chico Culture built cities, temples, and monuments that laid the foundation for thousands of years of Andean civilization. Patrick's book is now ava…
 
One of the most incredible stories from the 1904 St. Louis Olympics is that of George Eyser, a German immigrant to the US who competed in the gymnastics program. One of the most successful athletes of the third Olympiad, Eyser won six medals in one day, a record that still stands. This included three golds, all the more impressive considering that …
 
This episode is part of our abortion rights takeover series. It was originally dropped on our Patreon. It deals with the miracle plant of ancient Greece and Rome: Silphium. The people of Cyrene printed it on their money. It was considered a delicacy throughout the Greek and Roman world, as well as a powerful medicine that could be used to cure ever…
 
In this episode we begin uncovering the lifetime of Nader Shah (1688 - 1747), the last of the Great Asiatic Military Conquerors. A brilliant battlefield commander who reversed the fortunes of 18th century Iran, salvaging it from the teeth of internal and external foes. Beginning as the unlikely story of an insignificant and poverty stricken youth, …
 
Postcolonial feminist scholarship on the formation of gender relations primarily uses the analytic of colonizer-colonized dyad. In her new monograph, Gender Politics at Home and Abroad: Protestant Modernity in Colonial-Era Korea (Cambridge UP, 2020), Professor Hyaeweol Choi makes an important intervention by examining colonial Korea to propose a ne…
 
Immigration is one of the most fraught, and possibly most misunderstood, topics in American social discourse—yet, in most cases, the things we believe about immigration are based largely on myth, not facts. Using the tools of modern data analysis and ten years of pioneering research, Streets of Gold: America's Untold Story of Immigrant Success (Pub…
 
Carolyn Eichner's new book, The Paris Commune: A Brief History (Rutgers University Press, 2022) was published on March 18th, the anniversary of the eruption of Paris Commune of 1871. In this accessible history of the 72-day uprising during which the working-class people of Paris established their own government; experimented with forms of radical d…
 
Charters Wynn's book The Moderate Bolshevik: Mikhail Tomsky from the Factory to the Kremlin, 1880-1936 (Brill, 2022)is English-language biography of Mikhail Tomsky. It reveals Tomsky's central role in all the key developments in early Soviet history, including the stormy debates over the role of unions in the self-proclaimed workers’ state. Charter…
 
On a near-daily basis, data is being used to narrate our lives. Categorizing algorithms drawn from amassed personal data to assign narrative destinies to individuals at crucial junctures, simultaneously predicting and shaping the paths of our lives. Data is commonly assumed to bring us closer to objectivity, but the narrative paths these algorithms…
 
The Benin Bronzes are among the British Museum’s most prized possessions. Celebrated for their great beauty, they embody the history, myth and artistry of the ancient Kingdom of Benin, once West Africa’s most powerful, and today part of Nigeria. But despite the Bronzes’ renown, little has been written about the brutal imperial violence with which t…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2022 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login