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Speaking of Psychology

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Speaking of Psychology

American Psychological Association

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"Speaking of Psychology" is an audio podcast series highlighting some of the latest, most important and relevant psychological research being conducted today. Produced by the American Psychological Association, these podcasts will help listeners apply the science of psychology to their everyday lives.
 
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With Reason

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With Reason

New Humanist magazine | The RA

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Intelligent thinking for turbulent times, from New Humanist magazine and the Rationalist Association. Interviews with writers, researchers and academics who speak to our age – on subjects including religion, belief, race, politics, sex, technology, science, work and more. Hosted by New Humanist editor Samira Shackle, deputy editor Niki Seth-Smith, and series producer Alice Bloch.
 
Men experience depression differently. Al Levin interviews men who have suffered from depression, educating those who may know little about mental illnesses while giving hope to those who may be suffering. After three years of compiling and sharing stories, Al now includes interviews of experts on various topics around mental health.
 
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Building Good

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Building Good

Jen Hancock and Tim Coldwell

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We can build a better world by working together to make the places where we play, work, serve, learn, and live more inclusive and sustainable. Welcome to the Building Good Podcast with Tim Coldwell and Jen Hancock, a show that is all about making the world a better place. Whether you are a city planner or project director working to reduce carbon emissions or a non-profit leader passionate about inclusive communities, you’ve stepped onto the correct site. This is the place for those who beli ...
 
BEST SELF MAGAZINE is the leading voice for self-help and self-empowerment, with life-shifting content on holistic health, wellness, conscious living, and the mind, body, spirit connection. The BEST SELF podcast includes many of the magazine's top articles read by the actual authors, plus our feature interviews. Get inspired by some of the world's leading minds, with actionable tools to live your most vibrant life! Learn more at bestselfmedia.com
 
The Solomon Success podcast is dedicated to the timeless wisdom of King Solomon and the Book of Proverbs in order to maximize one’s business and life. To our advantage, we can find King Solomon’s financial strategies in addition to many life philosophies documented in biblical scriptures. Focusing on these enduring fundamentals of success allows us to bypass the “get-rich-quick” schemes that cause many to stumble on their journey toward success. Our concern is not only spiritual in nature, b ...
 
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show series
 
Stoic. Self-reliant. Unemotional. For many men, these watchwords of traditional masculinity still hold powerful sway. Men are less likely than women to seek help for mental health issues, they die by suicide more often, and they commit and are the victims of more homicides. Ronald F. Levant, EdD, discusses how cultural expectations of masculinity a…
 
What does it mean to contemplate 'motherhood' in a world that values some bodies - and some decisions - over others? Behavioural scientist Pragya Agarwal tells Alice Bloch about her experiences as a woman of South Asian heritage - from abortion, to pregnancy, to surrogacy - and the social, historical and scientific factors that shape how we talk ab…
 
For many people, the stereotypical image of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is an 8-year-old boy who can’t sit still in class. But in recent decades, scientists have gained a more sophisticated understanding of the causes and lifelong consequences of the disorder. Margaret Sibley, PhD, of Seattle Children’s Hospital, talks about the biolog…
 
Carlo Rovelli, the globally celebrated physicist and bestselling storyteller of science, talks to Niki Seth-Smith about the history - and sheer wonder - of quantum theory. How did a feverish young man named Werner Heisenberg, working alone on the North Sea island of Helgoland in 1925, develop a radical insight that would shake the world of physics?…
 
A special episode from the How To Academy Podcast. Human rights lawyer and award-winning author Philippe Sands QC meets the Dutch historian and viral superstar Rutger Bregman to hear a new argument: that it is realistic, as well as revolutionary, to assume that people are good. How To Academy is London’s home of big thinking. In livestream and thro…
 
On hot-button topics such as climate change, vaccines and genetically modified foods, science denial is rampant – and it crosses party and ideological lines. What are the psychological forces that lead people to disbelieve scientific consensus? Is science denial worse than it’s ever been? How have the internet and social media changed the landscape…
 
For centuries, we’ve had an intuitive sense that connecting with “nature” is good for our wellbeing. But what’s the hard evidence? What exactly is “nature” anyway? Should we be wary of it being prescribed as a catch-all cure for complex problems? And what impact does nature writing itself actually have? Science writer Lucy Jones talks to Alice Bloc…
 
In this episode, Al interviews Tracey Bear, a PhD student who is on a joint venture with Massey University and Reddit Institute and Plant and Food Research (part of a wider research program looking at how nutrition can impact well-being), on the topic of the Gut-Brain Axis and depression (recorded 8-25-21). Tracey describes the Gut-Brain Axis and t…
 
What can you learn from the science of behavior change that can help you make the changes you want to see in your life? Katy Milkman, PhD, a professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and author of the book “How to Change,” discusses the importance of accurately identifying the behavioral roadblocks standing in your way, how …
 
Alice Roberts, one of the UK’s leading public scientists, talks to Samira Shackle about what we can learn from the burial sites of the earliest Britons, as explored in her new book ‘Ancestors’. What does our prehistory – cannibalism and all - tell us about who we are? How does the way we mark death illuminate our perspective on life? And how are ge…
 
Human memory is imperfect – we all misplace our keys, forget acquaintances’ names and misremember the details of our own past. Daniel Schacter, PhD, a professor of psychology at Harvard University, discusses why memory is so fallible, the causes and consequences of the most common memory errors, how memory changes as we age, and how memory is tied …
 
This week marks 20 years since the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Researchers call this kind of shared disaster a “collective trauma.” Roxane Cohen Silver, PhD, of the University of California Irvine, who studies collective trauma and led a multi-year study on the mental and physical health effects…
 
What is power? Why do people seek it and how do they get it? Is it human nature to abuse power? And how might power – or powerlessness – affect our health and wellbeing? Dacher Keltner, PhD, psychology professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and author of the book “The Power Paradox: How We Gain and Lose Influence,” discusses these and…
 
In this episode, Al interviews Victor Janzen, a telecommunications project manager and mental illness activist (recorded 8-11-21). Victor speaks very candidly about the ongoing childhood trauma that he endured at the hands of his family members. Victor was eventually diagnosed with severe complex post-traumatic stress disorder (CPTSD), borderline p…
 
The mental health of athletes has been in the news a lot this year, thanks to Olympians Naomi Osaka and Simone Biles. The attention may be new, but the field of sport psychology is not. How do sport psychologists work with athletes? How might athletes’ mental health affect the public perception of mental health? As a mental performance consultant f…
 
“Eureka moments” have led to some of humanity’s greatest achievements in science, medicine, mathematics and the arts. But they’re not always that dramatic -- we’ve nearly all had the experience of solving a nagging problem in a flash of insight when we’re least expecting it. John Kounios, PhD, a professor of psychology at Drexel University, discuss…
 
Just in time for Friday the 13th, we discuss the psychology of superstition with Stuart Vyse, PhD, author of the book “Believing in Magic: The Psychology of Superstition.” Vyse discusses the origins of some popular superstitions, the psychological purposes superstition serves, and whether or not it’s possible that your lucky charm or pre-game ritua…
 
In this episode, Jack talks with two research scientists to discuss emerging ethical questions in wildlife management and conservation. Conservationist Bill Lynn of Clark University has a wealth of knowledge in conservation, rewilding and sustainability science. Michelle Graham is executive director of Wild Animal Initiative, a non-profit organisat…
 
Speaking of Psychology is taking a one-week summer break, so we’re revisiting one of our favorite episodes from the past year. In February, we talked to University of California, Berkeley psychologist Alison Gopnik about how children’s brains are optimized to explore the world and the implications that this has for human evolution, how we think abo…
 
The word “burnout” has become ubiquitous -- it seems to sum up the stress and exhaustion and disaffection that many of us are feeling this year. But are workers really more burned out than ever? And what does the term burnout actually mean? How does burnout differ from fatigue or stress? How do you know if you’re burned out? And what can individual…
 
In this episode, Al interviews Sarah Hancock, former professor of clinical psychiatric rehabilitation counseling at San Diego State University and a nationally certified rehabilitation counselor, on the topic of Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) (recorded 7-1-21). Sarah received 17 years of treatment consisting of thirty-seven combinations of more th…
 
More than 4% of people have some form of synesthesia, a neurological condition that causes senses to link and merge. People with synesthesia may taste words, hear colors, or see calendar dates arrayed in physical space. Dr. Julia Simner, a professor of neuropsychology at the University of Sussex in the U.K., discusses the many forms of synesthesia,…
 
These days, many companies use assessments such as personality tests as part of the hiring process or in career development programs. Fred Oswald, PhD, director of the Organization and Workforce Laboratory at Rice University, discusses why companies use these tests, what employers and workers can learn from them, and how new technologies, including…
 
Do you ever feel like a phony? Like you’re not really qualified for the job you’re doing, despite your achievements? Those are signs of the impostor phenomenon, also called impostor syndrome. Dr. Lisa Orbé-Austin, a counseling psychologist and career coach in New York City, and Dr. Kevin Cokley, a University of Texas at Austin psychology professor …
 
Too often, LGBTQ+ workers are "the only" in the office, which can lead to feelings of isolation. Diana Ellsworth, McKinsey partner and leader of our work on diversity, equity, and inclusion, talks with McKinsey talent experts Bryan Hancock and Bill Schaninger about our latest research on how to better support our LGBTQ+ colleagues -- not just durin…
 
Many Americans are headed back to the office this summer, but fault lines are emerging between some companies’ expectations for in-person work and their employees’ desire to continue working remotely. Tsedal Neeley, PhD, a professor at Harvard Business School and author of “Remote Work Revolution: Succeeding from Anywhere,” discusses the future of …
 
In this episode, Al interviews Dr. Joyce Baptist, a professor in the Couple and Family Therapy Program at Kansas State University, on the topic of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy (recorded 6-7-21). Dr. Baptist's current work focuses on examining the efficacy of clinical interventions to mitigate suffering from traumatic…
 
Over the past decades, the focus of LGBTQ activism has shifted and evolved, from the AIDS crisis in the 1980s to the fight for marriage equality to the focus on transgender rights today. Peter Hegarty, PhD, author of the book “A Recent History of Lesbian and Gay Psychology: From Homophobia to LGBT,” discusses how psychological research has reflecte…
 
Is psychology research in a crisis or a renaissance? Over the past decade, scientists have realized that many published research results, including some classic findings in psychology, don’t always hold up to repeat trials. Brian Nosek, PhD, of the Center for Open Science, discusses how psychologists are leading a movement to address that problem, …
 
Guns killed nearly 44,000 Americans in 2020, a higher number than in any other year in the past two decades. Meanwhile, a spate of mass shootings in the spring brought gun violence to the forefront of the national conversation again. Susan Sorenson, PhD, director of the Ortner Center on Violence and Abuse at the University of Pennsylvania, discusse…
 
Is your sleep schedule a mess lately? You’re not alone. The stress and disrupted routines of the past year have taken a toll on our sleep. Jennifer Martin, PhD, a professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and spokesperson for the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, discusses how sleep affects our physical and mental health, what the …
 
In this episode, Al interviews Dr. Damon Ashworth, clinical psychologist and expert in the field of sleep and treatments for insomnia, on the topic of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-i) (recorded 4-29-21).Dr. Ashworth helps listeners understand the definition of CBT-i and insomnia. He shares the critical elements of CBT-i and explain…
 
One year ago this week, George Floyd was murdered on camera by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. To mark the anniversary of Floyd’s death, we talked to Cedric Alexander, PsyD, a clinical psychologist and former police chief, about community policing, racial bias in policing, how communities and policymakers might rethink the role of police …
 
Zoom, Facebook, group text messages: This past year, technology has sometimes felt like the glue that’s kept many of our relationships alive. More and more, we talk to each other with technology in between us. Jeff Hancock, PhD, director of the Social Media Lab at Stanford University, discusses how this is affecting human communication, including w…
 
In recent years, research on the power of growth mindset has made the leap from the psychology lab to popular culture. Growth mindset is the belief that a person’s intelligence and abilities can grow and improve with practice, and researchers have found that brief exercises that increase growth mindset can help keep students motivated when they fac…
 
David Pearce is a prominent figure within the transhumanism movement and one of the co-founders of the World Transhumanist Association, currently rebranded and incorporated as Humanity+. Pearce maintains a series of websites devoted to transhumanist topics and what he calls the "hedonistic imperative", a moral obligation to work towards the aboliti…
 
For people with Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory, or HSAM, every day is memorable. Ask them what they were doing on this date 10 years ago, and they’ll be able to tell you. Markie Pasternak, one of the youngest people identified with HSAM, and Michael Yassa, PhD, director of the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory at the Unive…
 
What if the way you think about your brain and how and why it functions is just plain wrong? Lisa Feldman Barrett, PhD, a professor of psychology at Northeastern University and author of the book “7 ½ Lessons About the Brain,” discusses myths about the brain and her theory that it evolved not to think but to control our bodies, and that emotions ar…
 
In this episode, Al interviews Sam Morris, founder of The Unbreakable Human Collective and Managing Director - Head of Culture at Five to Flow (recorded 11-2-21). Sam was always dedicated to tennis. This allowed him to have an excuse to avoid high school and college parties that caused him great social anxiety. An off-season ACL tear gave Sam his l…
 
Jack talks to Dr. Melanie Joy about the psychology of eating meat, black and white thinking in the vegan community, effective vegan advocacy and how to have better relationships. Dr. Melanie Joy is a Harvard-educated psychologist, relationship coach, and communication specialist and she is the world’s leading expert on the psychology of eating anim…
 
Over the past several years, climate change has moved from an abstract idea to a reality in many Americans’ lives – a reality that we are increasingly worried about. An APA survey found that two-thirds of American adults said that they felt at least a little “eco-anxiety,” defined as anxiety or worry about climate change and its effects. Dr. Thomas…
 
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