Best Isrs podcasts we could find (Updated February 2019)
Related podcasts: US Government Music  
Isrs public [search 0]
×
Join millions of Player FM users today to get Isrs news and insights whenever you like, even when you're offline. Podcast smarter with the podcast app that refuses to compromise … it's free and easy.
Podcast smarter! Player FM is free and easy.
show episodes
 
The National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC) History Office created this tour to focus on the intelligence lessons taught through the museum's collection.
 
E
Eurovision Corner
Weekly
 
A humble fan who has far too much to say about the Eurovision Song Contest! I am here offering my two cents on all things Eurovision, please feel free to join in!
 
Loading …
show series
 
The season concludes with my final review of the Eurovision entries in 2018. This episode will look at the entries in the second half of Semi Final 2! What do I make of the entries for Georgia, Poland, Malta, Hungary, Latvia, Sweden, Montenegro, Slovenia and Ukraine!
 
The series continues with my final review of the Eurovision entries in 2018. This episode will look at the entries in the first half of Semi Final 2! What is my second opinion of the entries for; Norway, Romania, Serbia, San Marino, Denmark, Russia, Moldova, The Netherlands and Australia? Tune in to find out!…
 
The series continues with my final review of the Eurovision entries in 2018. This episode will look at the entries in the second half of Semi Final 1! What is my second take on the entries for; F.Y.R. Macedonia, Croatia, Austria, Greece, Finland, Armenia, Switzerland, Ireland and Cyprus? Tune in to find out!…
 
The season continues with my final review of the Eurovision entries in 2018. This episode will look at the entries in the first half of Semi Final 1! What is my second take on the entries for; Azerbaijan, Iceland, Albania, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Lithuania, Israel, Belarus, Estonia and Bulgaria? Tune in to find out!…
 
The second series begins by offering a final review of the entries already qualified to the Grand Final of the 2018 Eurovision Song Contest! What are my thoughts on France, Germany, Italy, Spain the United Kingdom and this year's hosts; Portugal??
 
The series continues with my opinions of the official Eurovision entries as they are released! This episode will look at the entries for Israel, Russia, F.Y.R. Macedonia, Lithuania, Bulgaria and Georgia!
 
The series continues with my opinions of the official Eurovision entries as they are released! This episode will look at the entries for Croatia, Australia, Austria, Ireland, Sweden and Norway!
 
The series continues with my opinions of the official Eurovision entries as they are released! This episode will look at the entries for San Marino, Poland, Iceland, Azerbaijan, Portugal and Belgium!
 
The series continues with my opinions of the official Eurovision entries as they are released! This episode will look at the entries for Romania, The Netherlands, Cyprus, Finland and Estonia!
 
The series continues with my opinions of the official Eurovision entries as they are released! This episode will look at the entries for Slovenia, Hungary, Ukraine, Latvia & Armenia!
 
The series continues with my opinions of the official Eurovision entries as they are released! This episode will look at the entries for Belarus, Montenegro, Serbia, Germany and Moldova!
 
The series continues with my opinions of the official Eurovision entries as they are released! This episode will look at the entries for Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Italy and Greece!
 
The series continues with my opinions of the official Eurovision entries as they are released! This first episode will look at the entries for Albania, France, the Czech Republic, Spain and Malta!
 
My debut broadcast! (without the muted intro, hence the re-upload discussing the six competing entries at Eurovision: You Decide. Which do I believe should take the ticket to Lisbon, have a listen and find out!
 
After being brought back from the Pacific Theater, this George went to a children’s playground in San Diego, California. The museum received it in 1959 and in 2000 the museum began an extensive, eight-year restoration. They found serial numbers from four different aircraft during the disassembly. This beautiful restoration either came from seve ...…
 
The B-29’s photo-reconnaissance capabilities yielded what Major General Haywood Hansell called, “probably the greatest…single contribution…in the air war with Japan.” The Superfortress’ photo-reconnaissance configuration was the F-13A. On 1 November 1944, one of the two F-13A aircraft that arrived from the U.S. just two days before flew from Sa ...…
 
The Catalina performed some of the most critical surveillance missions of World War II. An RAF Catalina located the German battleship Bismarck, enabling the Royal Navy to destroy it in May 1941. A Canadian Catalina warned the Royal Navy’s Indian Ocean fleet of the approach of a Japanese carrier group in April 1942 before being shot down by a Ze ...…
 
The world’s first operational jet fighter was the Me 262A-1. On 16 May 1945, technical intelligence personnel found this aircraft at Munich-Riem airfield where fighter ace Adolph Galland’s Jagdverband (JV) 44 left it behind as the unit fled to Austria. Personnel of the 54th Air Disarmament Squadron named it Beverly Anne and it became one of 10 ...…
 
The FW 190D-9 on display surrendered to the Royal Air Force at Flensburg, Germany, up near the Danish border. It served with JG3 during the war. The American technical intelligence troops acquired it from the British and loaded it on board the H.M.S. Reaper for the trip back to the United States. As FE-120, the aircraft participated in six hour ...…
 
American forces captured this Bf 109G-10 at an airfield near Munich at the end of the war. It originally belonged to Jagdgeschwader (JG) 52, the same unit the highest scoring aces of all time belonged to. American technical intelligence personnel trucked the aircraft to Cherbourg, France, where it went on board the H.M.S. Reaper, along with the ...…
 
Sometimes technical intelligence personnel went to great lengths to recover enemy equipment and bring it back for exploitation. The museum’s Ju 88D-1 defected from the Romanian Air Force to the Royal Air Force on the island of Cyprus in July 1943. The British flew it to Egypt and turned it over to American volunteer pilots at Cairo in October 1 ...…
 
When intelligence indicated that the Germans planned to deploy a ballistic missile against England, one of Churchill’s scientific advisors claimed it to be impossible since, in his expert opinion, it required solid propellant. According to Lord Cherwell, that made the missile too huge to hide, thus it was false intelligence. When the V-2s began ...…
 
When the V-1s began to fall in London in June 1944, Dr. R.V. Jones devised an ingenious plan to save lives. Knowing that German double-agents needed to provide at least some truth and that the V-1 flying bombs typically fell several miles short of Trafalgar Square, Jones determined that the spies needed to report the V-1 impacts to the north an ...…
 
OPERATION FORTITUDE was the Allied effort to deceive the Germans about the timing and location of the upcoming Allied invasion of Normandy. The plan called for intelligence to make the Germans believe that Norway was the primary target for the initial invasion. They also wanted to hide the buildup of forces in Southern England and to convince t ...…
 
The Spitfire’s PR, or photo reconnaissance, variant proved to be extremely successful in the imagery collection role. The camera-equipped fighter aircraft accomplished several key reconnaissance missions. For the high-altitude, highspeed area coverage missions, the pilot of a high-flying fighter kept constant watch on the rear-view mirror to ma ...…
 
The P-38 played a critical role in applying the decisions of national policy makers after intelligence provided critical information. On 14 April 1943, the U.S. naval intelligence effort, code-named “Magic,” intercepted and decrypted a message containing specific details regarding an upcoming inspection tour by Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, the com ...…
 
The Italian aircraft on display is a Macchi MC.200 and it represented the British technical intelligence cooperation the US received in World War II. The aircraft transferred from a squadron in Italy to the 165th Squadron in North Africa during November 1942. The Italians abandoned it at Benghazi airfield following the battle of El Alamein and ...…
 
During the first months of the war in the Pacific, the Navy OP-20-G group broke the very complex Japanese Imperial Navy JN-25 code. In decrypted transmissions, they saw the code “AF” mentioned several times and thought it might mean an attack was coming on that location. To affirm it was Midway Island, they used a communications cable that ran ...…
 
One of the greatest Foreign Materiel Exploitation stories of World War II was the testing of a crashed Japanese Navy A6M2 Zeke, known as Koga’s Zero. After the Japanese attack on Dutch Harbor, Alaska, in June 1942, a Zero piloted by an Ensign Koga, crash-landed on an island in the Aleutians. A PBY Catalina spotted the Zero. Navy personnel recov ...…
 
The cipher machine known as Enigma encrypted and decrypted secret message traffic for the Germans in World War II. Although invented in the early 1920s, Germany used it before and during the war. The Polish Cipher Bureau earned the distinction of first breaking Enigma ciphers in December 1932. Beginning in 1938, the Germans increased the comple ...…
 
Moving into the World War II years, the circular radio directional finder antenna on top of the museum’s O-47B recalls an interesting intelligence episode early in the war: The Battle of the Beams. Knickebein (Crooked Leg) was a German program that used two radio beams to accurately navigate and bomb at night. British intelligence at the Air Mi ...…
 
Strategic bombing became a reality in World War I with both Zeppelin and fixed-wing crews attacking infrastructure targets and even civilian populations. Fiorello La Guardia, congressman from New York and future mayor of New York City, led about 100 Americans that flew Italian-built Caproni bombers for the Italian Air Force. While he used his p ...…
 
The U.S. developed an aircraft-mounted radiotelephone near the end of the war known as the SCR-68 (Set, Complete, Radio). This DH-4 has one, indicated by the generator on the wheel strut. That generator is a good example of linking a modification to a new capability: voice communication instead of telegraphy. The U.S. Army Signal Corps discover ...…
 
The German fighters of World War I inflicted tremendous losses on the opposing photo-reconnaissance sorties. To counter those losses, France began configuring single seat fighters, such as this SPAD XIII for high-speed reconnaissance. The mission did not call for extreme fighter-like maneuvering, but very fast, level flight, at high-altitude. T ...…
 
The stationary observation balloon, or aerostat, had an advantage over aircraft in that it had a direct telephone line to the artillery battery, giving near real-time reconnaissance feedback during an attack. The armies deployed them no closer than three miles from the front, and two observers normally ascended to 3,600 feet. While fixed-wing a ...…
 
Although the museum’s German Halberstadt CL IV is technically an attack aircraft, it looks like the standard observation aircraft of the First World War, with pilot in front and armed observer in back. Early in the war, it became obvious that the aircraft and the artillery battery required the same map to be successful. The British developed a ...…
 
One Foreign Materiel Exploitation (FME) story during the war involved the synchronized machine gun. French pilot Roland Garros and his mechanic armored his prop with steel plates to enable a machine gun fire through it. He said about one in 10 bullets would ricochet. Garros downed several German aircraft with it before going down behind enemy l ...…
 
The Germans used basically the same rotary aircraft engine as the French and the British, because they licensed it before the war. As the Fokker Triplane’s Oberursel engine became harder to replace later in the conflict, the German ace Josef Jacobs used Foreign Materiel Acquisition (FMA) to solve the problem. He offered a case of champagne to a ...…
 
The Fokker D.VII was arguably the best fighter aircraft of World War I. As a part of the Armistice Agreement, the U.S. received 142 Fokker D.VII aircraft as war reparation payment. Eleven of them came here to Dayton, Ohio, to the Engineering Division at McCook Field. There, engineers made extensive modifications to their powerplants by installi ...…
 
When World War I started, all the warring powers had airplanes, but lacked in a complete understanding of their potential. British and French aviators made critical reconnaissance observations that helped save 100,000 British troops from capture at Mons and win the First Battle of the Marne. One of the most difficult tasks was getting ground co ...…
 
Wilbur Wright enabled the first use of airplanes in combat by teaching two Italian officers to fly in 1909. The Italians used airplanes in Libya during the Italo-Turkish War of 1911. That conflict marked the first use of reconnaissance aircraft (a Bleriot XI on Oct. 23, 1911) and the first bombing attack (a German Etrich Taube on Nov. 1, 1911). ...…
 
Air intelligence did not begin with the Wright Brothers. It initially became possible because of the Montgolfier brothers’ first manned balloon flight on 21 November 1783. Count Pilatre de Rozier and Marquis d’Arlandes ascended up to 3,000 feet in a hot air balloon and traveled for five miles (see model above you). Eleven years later, the Frenc ...…
 
The National Museum of the United States Air Force began in 1923, not as a tourist attraction, but as an educational tool for Army engineers to study aeronautical engineering techniques from around the world. In the ensuing years, the museum also served as a place to study the application of air power, ballistic missiles and the contributions t ...…
 
Google login Twitter login Classic login