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Best Mike Bates And Bill Parker podcasts we could find (updated April 2020)
Best Mike Bates And Bill Parker podcasts we could find
Updated April 2020
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Baseball is vastly richer because of the characters who have become part of the game's legend. And no one was more of a character than Mets pitcher Hayden "Sidd" Finch, who was unveiled by Sports Illustrated 35 years ago the day this episode drops. Mike and Bill go through the mysterious and surprising career of a true phenom, including his downfal…
 
There is no denying that Pete Rose is one of the biggest figures in baseball history, and one of the greatest players of all time. There is also no denying, 31 years after Sports Illustrated revealed that he had gambled on his own team multiple times over multiple seasons, that he is one of the most controversial. Mike and Bill go through the tumul…
 
In a slight departure this week, Mike and Bill take a listener suggestion to focus on the influenza epidemic that swept across the globe in 1918 and lingered into 1920. That epidemic did have some effects on the game and played a role in further driving a wedge between the players and the owners that many say contributed to throwing of the 1919 Wor…
 
By far the most successful attempt to create a third major league began in earnest 107 years ago this week in a hotel in Indianapolis. It fizzled out after two years, but left a legacy that still governs the professional game today. Mike and Bill leaf through the short life of the Federal League, and how we still feel the effects of its rebellion m…
 
It was a punchline across the country 47 years ago this week, when Yankees pitchers Fritz Peterson and Mike Kekich announced they had decided to switch families the previous winter. Like many trades, this one turned out to be pretty one-sided, as Kekich's life and career were upended in the aftermath. Mike and Bill look back at what made this seem …
 
You'd be hard pressed to find a better combo in baseball's Golden Age than Sandy Koufax and Don Drysdale, the twin aces of the LA Dodgers. But the pair also were also shrewd negotiations who realized their power together when they announced 54 years ago this week that they'd be holding out. Mike and Bill look back at their holdout, how they exerted…
 
Bar none, the most iconic style choice in Major League Baseball history is probably Rollie Fingers's handlebar mustache. The closer's signature 'stache was his calling card and, when given the chance to extend his career by shaving it 34 years ago this week, he refused. Mike and Bill look back at one of the first modern closers, the first man to 30…
 
Despite being largely forgotten today, Oscar Charleston was perhaps the greatest and most popular Negro Leaguer of his day and one of the best players in baseball history. With special guest Jeremy Beer, whose biography of Charleston just won the Harold and Dorothy Seymour Medal, Mike and Bill learn about who Charleston was on and off the diamond, …
 
There has never been an infield that has played together longer, more often, or perhaps better than the Dodgers' incredible combination of Steve Garvey, Davey Lopes, Bill Russell, and Ron Cey, a dynamic foursome that lasted 9 years and 833 starts together. But it all came to an end 38 years ago this week, when Lopes was traded away. Mike and Bill e…
 
In 1912, Jim Thorpe was the greatest athlete in the world. But by the end of January, 1913, he surrendered his Olympic medals in shame after evidence surfaced of him playing pro baseball four years earlier. 107 years ago this week, the most famous man in America to a three year contract. Mike and Bill examine Thorpe's road to this spectacle, the co…
 
There are no excuses, only reasons for what Marty Bergen did 120 years ago this week, when a lifetime of paranoia and mental illness culminated in the murder of his family, and the suicide that shocked a the rural community he lived in, and the baseball community at large. Mike and Bill look back on the troubled life of Bergen, and his attempts to …
 
The news shocked Detroit when the city found out one of its heroes, Hank Greenberg, had been sold to the Pittsburgh Pirates. But the reason for the deal, which happened 73 years ago this week, is even crazier. Mike and Bill dig into the long and eventful life of one of baseball's best sluggers, his struggles against anti-Semitism, his heroic servic…
 
Hoyt Wilhelm did everything unconventionally. He didn't look like a ballplayer. He threw soft, almost entirely knuckleballs. And unlike other knucklers, he stayed almost exclusively in the bullpen. But he was exceptionally effective, and 35 years ago this week his brilliance on the bump was recognized with an election to the Hall of Fame, the first…
 
One of the most beloved broadcasters and beloved people in baseball, Ernie Harwell was an institution in Detroit when, 29 years ago this week, the Tigers told him they didn't want him anymore. Mike and Bill document the Frick Award winner's career and how it almost ended, and the backlash that led to its continuation. Plus, happy birthday to Mo Vau…
 
One of the greatest Cubs of all time, Ron Santo was almost traded out of his beloved adopted home 46 years ago this week, but turned the tables on his team, becoming the first player to invoke his 10-and-5 rights and forced a trade to the other side of town. Mike and Bill recount the life and career of the self-professed biggest Cubs fan in the wor…
 
Dick Allen was one of the most controversial players of all time, a deeply and often unfairly maligned slugger whose own fans booed him mercilessly. Responding to a listener request, Mike and Bill recount Allen's tumultuous and Hall of Fame-worthy career on the 45th anniversary of his refusal to be report after being traded to the Braves. Plus, hap…
 
Monty Stratton was on the way to a distinguished career when a hunting trip abruptly turned into a battle for his career, and for his life. Mike and Bill recount the accident that altered his path forever, and the amazing comeback that was literally something out of Hollywood. Plus, happy birthday to Howard Johnson and Richie Hebner!…
 
This episode is dedicated to the memory of Dorothy Seymour Mills. It's probably not fair to say that Albert Belle was misunderstood. But it is fair to say he made anyone who wanted to understand him regret trying. But he was as much a dynamic force at the plate as he was a disruptive one away from it who, 23 years ago this week, signed the richest …
 
Normally, of course, when a club wins the World Series, it inspires so much good will that it forges a generation of new permanent fans for a club. But, Wayne Huizenga's fire sale in the wake of the 1997 win, which began with the trade of Moises Alou 22 years ago this week, poisoned Miami forever after. Mike and Bill look back on the Marlins early …
 
From its founding in 1939 through 1973, Little League Baseball refused to let girls play, and was deeply and intransigently committed to that position until a New Jersey court decision forced them to relent only 46 years ago this week. Mike and Bill look back on the history of women and girls playing baseball prior to that decision and the suit tha…
 
Few men in baseball have been as universally beloved as Buzzie Bavasi, who took over the Dodgers front office 69 years ago this week. Joining Mike and Bill to discuss Buzzie's life and 45 year career is his son, Bob Bavasi of Japanball.com. Plus, happy birthday to Brad Radke and Mickey Rivers!By Mike Bates and Bill Parker
 
John Updike is often celebrated for having written The Great American Novel, but he also may have written The Great American Essay, which was published 59 years ago this week. Printed in The New Yorker, "Hub Fans Bid Kid Adieu," is a tribute to The Great American Hitter, Ted Williams, beautifully describing The Splendid Splinter's final game. Mike …
 
It was only seven years before the Mets won their first championship, but it must have seemed like 70, as they struggled to not to lose 100 games every year. But 50 years ago this week, they finally did, finishing off a miracle season by felling the mighty Orioles in five games. Mike and Bill go through the early history of the Mets and their amazi…
 
We've talked about the conspiracy and we've talked about the trial, but this week, on the anniversary of the last out of the 1919 World Series, Mike and Bill talk to SABR Director of Editorial Content and Black Sox expert Jacob Pomrenke (@buckweaver) about the Series itself, what plays were suspect, and how little we actually know about how exactly…
 
The first-year expansion Mets of 1962 are, famously, one of the worst teams of all time, and may well be the worst team to suit up since the turn of the last century. In this shorter, solo episode, Bill tells the story of the Mets' dismal season through their final game, 57 years ago this week, which included a particularly weird and appropriate ei…
 
Lyman Bostock was one of the most dynamic young stars in the American League, compared favorably with Rod Carew and predicted to win multiple batting titles. He was one of the early benefactors of free agency, was quickly becoming one of the most popular players in the game, and may have been on a Hall of Fame track. But 41 years ago this week, Bos…
 
There have been four pitchers to strike out 20 batters in a game, but only one of them did it twice, and the second time that happened, 23 years ago this week, was the last great start he'd make as a member of the Red Sox. At a patron's request, Mike and Bill look at the good, the bad, and the ugly in Clemens' Hall of Fame-worthy career, and talk a…
 
Ruth and Gehrig. Brett and White. Mays and McCovey. There have been so many great pairs of teammates in baseball history. But none of them played together as long or as often as Alan Trammell and Lou Whitaker, who began their HoF-worthy careers in the same game 42 years ago this week. Mike and Bill trace their excellent and often overlooked time to…
 
We spend so much time talking about the most famous and greatest players to star in the major leagues. But there was a time when our country was full of stars in every small town. For the 65th and 62nd anniversaries, respectively, of Joe Baumann breaking the single season pro HR record and Steve Dalkowski K'ing 24 and BBing 18, we talk to @GaylonWh…
 
It took 21 years and 742 starts, but 37 years ago this week, Gaylord Perry was finally caught greasing up a baseball. Or was he? In response to a Patreon request from Jim Gatton, Mike and Bill examine the life and career of baseball's most beloved, and most unrepentant, cheater, and try to figure out the secrets that the Hall of Fame righty still w…
 
Dave Dravecky's comeback was described as something out of a storybook. It was a miracle. It was short-lived as, 30 years ago this week, his attempt to return from cancer surgery on his pitching arm ended on the mound in the most gruesome way imaginable. Mike and Bill look back on the career of Dravecky, what made his comeback so easy to root for, …
 
Two of the best pitchers of the Dead Ball Era faced off 109 years ago this week, putting up matching goose eggs for 16 innings before the game between the Athletics and White Sox was called on a account of darkness. It serves as a perfect jumping off point to discuss the fantastic new graphic non-fiction book Baseball Epic: Famous and Forgotten Sta…
 
Pete Rose has become one of the most polarizing and controversial figures in baseball history. But before that, he was the brash and charismatic star of one of the greatest teams in baseball history. And 41 years ago this week, Rose's 44 game hitting streak was snapped by the Atlanta Braves. At the request of Patreon supporter Steve Harmon, we dig …
 
Lefty Grove is one of the ten best pitchers of all time. But because of a late start to his major league career, 78 years ago this week, the A's and Red Sox legend won the last game of his career, his 300th. Mike and Bill look back at his legendary career and why it got started so late. Plus, happy birthday to Cliff Johnson and Roy McMillan!…
 
Very few players in the 20th century transformed the way baseball was perceived as much as Jim Bouton, the hotshot Yankees starter who, after arm injuries and a trade to the Seattle Pilots, wrote perhaps the greatest baseball book of all time. Bouton passed away last week, so Mike and Bill talk about his life, his book, and the legacy of both, alon…
 
We have spent a lot of time over 107 previous episodes making fun of former Commissioner Bowie Kuhn, but this episode we really take the time to catalogue what made him such an exceptionally frustrating boss of baseball on the 48th anniversary of Kuhn reversing course and deciding that Negro Leaguers would be full members of the Hall of Fame. We ta…
 
Walter Johnson was probably the greatest pitcher of the first half of the 20th century until suddenly feeling his age in 1920. Weirdly, that was also when he threw one of the greatest games of his career, his only no-hitter, 99 years ago this week. Mike and Bill talk with Steven Goldman (@gostevengoldman) about The Big Train's career and legacy, an…
 
Few second basemen could match Cubs great Ryne Sandberg, and, of those, few could match Sandberg's epic performance 35 years ago this week, when he singlehandedly brought his team back from the brink of defeat against Bruce Sutter and the Cardinals on national TV. With Bill off this week, Mike digs through Sandberg's life and career, including his …
 
There may have never been an athlete as singular as Bo Jackson, a two sport star whose potential and flashes of brilliance tantalized the world until it all came crashing down. On the 33rd anniversary of him signing with the Kansas City Royals, Mike and Bill look back on Bo's careers, his downfall, his comeback, and his legacy. Plus, happy birthday…
 
Bernard Malamud's iconic novel The Natural has many inspirations, but its most iconic may be the shooting of Roy Hobbs. The inspiration for it occurred 70 years ago this week, when Eddie Waitkus was gunned down in his hotel by an obsessive fan. We go through the life of Waitkus, the tragic shooting that changed everything, its aftermath for both vi…
 
There's a lot we don't know about Old Hoss Radbourn, including, as it turns out, exactly how many victories he had for Providence and Boston in the 19th century. But, 128 years ago approximately this week, he won his 300th game. Mike and Bill explore Radbourn's life, his historic 1884, and his downfall. Then they're joined by Old Hoss Radbourn hims…
 
Phil and Joe Niekro went head-to-head several times over the course of their long and illustrious careers. But in an utterly bizarre coincidence, 43 years ago this week, Joe hit the only home run in his big league career in more than 1200 plate appearances off of his big brother. In an episode abbreviated by the holiday weekend, Mike and Bill trace…
 
Few trades in the modern era have altered the course of two franchises like the deal 30 years ago this week that sent Mark Langston from the Seattle Mariners to the Montreal Expos for three pitchers, one of whom was a wild, 6'10" left-hander named Randy Johnson. Obviously, Johnson would go on to become one of the greatest pitchers in baseball histo…
 
There have been few pitching prospects as exciting as Herb Score, and few downfalls that have been disappointing. This week, 62 years ago, Score was struck by a line drive off the bat of Gil McDougald, knocking him out of the rest of the season and, supposedly, ruining his career. But the truth is more complicated, as Mike and Bill find as they exa…
 
One of the most dynamic players of all time, Rickey Henderson still has many fans polarized. But everyone seems to agree that he was the best leadoff man and base stealer in baseball history. And, it was 28 years ago this week that he cemented those titles with his 939th career steal, breaking Lou Brock's all time record. Mike and Bill dig into Ric…
 
Kevin Mitchell was not exactly known for his defense, but 30 years ago this week, he made one of the more amazing catches in baseball history at the beginning of his MVP year. Mike and Bill look back at Mitchell's performance on and off the field, as well as other unlikely MVP seasons. Plus, happy birthday to Mike Scott and Bob Smith.…
 
In the spring of 1925, Babe Ruth suddenly collapsed in the arms of a teammate, sparking ridicule in the New York press for what became known as "The Bellyache Heard Round the World." Stomach surgery 94 years ago this week would keep the Babe out for two months and tank the Yankees' hopes that year. Mike and Bill look at Ruth's tumultuous offseason,…
 
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