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Best Mouse On Mars podcasts we could find (updated June 2020)
Best Mouse On Mars podcasts we could find
Updated June 2020
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The award-winning Curiosity Daily podcast from Curiosity.com will help you get smarter about the world around you — every day. In less than 10 minutes, you’ll get a unique mix of research-based life hacks, the latest science and technology news, and more. Discovery's Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer will help you learn about your mind and body, outer space and the depths of the sea, and how history shaped the world into what it is today.
 
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Learn about why NASA doesn’t launch rockets in the rain (which is why there was a delay launching the SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft carrying NASA astronauts Robert Behnken and Douglas Hurley); why llamas are so promising for protecting humans against viruses like COVID-19; and why things get cold — when they’re wet, when you’re chewing mint gum, an…
 
Renowned climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe explains how we know that climate change is caused by humans. Then, learn about why there’s no such thing as “common sense.” Links to donate: Discovery’s Social Good Initiative RISE: Reducing Inequality and Supporting Empowerment https://www.discovery.com/dnews/help-reduce-inequality---support-empowerment…
 
Learn about the surprising way Japanese honeybees defend themselves against "murder hornets" (actual name: Asian giant hornets); how “atmospheric tidal waves” make Venus’s atmosphere rotate faster than the actual planet; and the wide spectrum of how people mentally visualize images, including aphantasia and hyperphantasia. Japanese honeybees defend…
 
Researchers Elizabeth Sawchuk and Mary Prendergast discuss the surprising discoveries archaeologists are making thanks to new technology. Plus: learn how eye-tracking software can tell you more about you than you think. Eye-tracking software can tell more about you than you think by Grant Currin Kröger, J. L., Lutz, O. H.-M., & Müller, F. (2020). W…
 
Learn about how your ancestors’ work habits might be influencing your own; the first evidence of an underwater dinosaur; and how an aquarium successfully reproduced coral in captivity for the first time. Societies with a history of hard farming labor tend to work more hours today by Kelsey Donk Arduous farm labor in the past means longer working ho…
 
Learn about why selfish people have false memories of being generous; why we can’t do brain transplants; and why you used to be able to buy life insurance from airport vending machines. Selfish people actually have false memories of being generous by Kelsey Donk Memory misfires help selfish maintain their self-image. (2020). EurekAlert! https://www…
 
Learn about whether it’s a good idea to rub dirt on your wounds; how funny memes can help save endangered species like the proboscis monkey; and how space travel changes the shape of astronauts’ hearts. When it comes to wounds, science says "rub some dirt on it" might be good advice by Cameron Duke Dillow, C. (2013, May 23). Got A Wound? Science Sa…
 
Learn about how archaeologists are solving a prehistoric poop problem; what leads people to be “cultural omnivores”; and an easy trick for telling stars and planets apart when you’re stargazing. What can we learn from prehistoric poop? by Cameron Duke Borry, M., Cordova, B., Perri, A., Wibowo, M., Prasad Honap, T., Ko, J., Yu, J., Britton, K., Gird…
 
Learn about breakthrough research into what our brains do while we sleep; how plants fight back when they hear they’re being eaten; and why the Y2K bug is actually what a well-handled crisis looks like afterward. This is the first direct evidence that our brains replay waking experiences while we sleep by Cameron Duke Eichenlaub, J.-B., Jarosiewicz…
 
Learn about why it might actually be pretty easy to drink an elephant under the table; how carrier pigeons like Cher Ami helped win the world wars; and why night owls may have worse emotion regulation than morning people. Apparently, elephants get drunk and they're total lightweights by Cameron Duke Burke, J. (2010, December 3). Elephants on drunke…
 
Learn about why the marijuana classifications of indica and sativa aren’t based in science; how clean your washing machine really gets your clothes; and why researchers staged sword fights to learn about the Bronze Age. Indica and sativa marijuana classifications aren't based in science by Andrea Michelson Naftulin, J. (2020, April 20). There is no…
 
Learn about why people tune out facts and trust their guts in medical emergencies; a Victorian-era version of credit cards; and how scientists are trying to add an eighth row to the periodic table of elements. People tune out facts and trust their guts in medical emergencies by Kelsey Donk UTA study: In crisis, people trust feelings over facts. (20…
 
Learn about how studying World of Warcraft helped researchers learn how to respond to the coronavirus pandemic; how scientists described mouse facial expressions for the first time; and how social rejection can fuel creativity. Scientists studied a "pandemic" in World of Warcraft to learn how to fight a real virus by Grant Currin Fenlon, W. (2020, …
 
Learn about why natural selection favors superstitions; why the way our noses smell is way more complicated than we thought; and where scientists think 'Oumuamua, the first interstellar object, came from. How natural selection favors superstitions by Cameron Duke Foster, K. R., & Kokko, H. (2008). The evolution of superstitious and superstition-lik…
 
Learn about what makes fruit mealy; a new therapy technique for parents that could reduce their kids’ anxiety; and what scientists learned when they tried to build a second Earth, in the notorious story of “Biosphere 2.” What makes fruit mealy? by Andrea Michelson SciShow. (2020). What Makes Fruit Mealy? [YouTube Video]. In YouTube. https://www.you…
 
Learn about whether you should wad or fold toilet paper, according to science; why your brain evolved to hoard supplies but shame others for doing the same; and the purpose of grand unified field theory, with help from astrophysicist Adam Becker. Whether to wad or fold toilet paper, according to science by Andrea Michelson Myers, Q. (2019, March 12…
 
Learn about where your emotions come from and how you can hack them, with help from psychology researcher and neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett. Plus: learn why tarantula venom could be an alternative to opioids. Maybe tarantula venom could be an alternative to opioids by Cameron Duke Agwa, A. J., Tran, P., Mueller, A., Tran, H. N. T., Deuis, J. …
 
Learn about the impact of maladaptive daydreaming, then learn about whether dogs can recognize our faces in photographs. Then, author Maryn McKenna will explain how antibiotics created modern agriculture and changed the way the world eats. People with 'maladaptive daydreaming' spend up to 4 hours a day lost in their imaginations by Kelsey Donk Peop…
 
Learn about a surprising tip for de-cluttering your house; 3 extinct relatives of humans that lived in the same place and time; and why the possibility that the universe might not be expanding at the same rate everywhere is a huge deal. What's The First Step for De-Cluttering Your House? by Reuben Westmas The Ohio State University. (2017, June 26).…
 
Learn about how a psychologist named B.F. Skinner proved that pigeons can be superstitious; the science of histamines and why allergy medications make us sleepy; and the 5 ages of the universe, including the Stelliferous Era we’re in right now. Pigeons Can Be Superstitious — And a Psychologist Once Proved It by Ashley Hamer Superstitious behavior |…
 
Learn what researchers found when they tried to build the perfect profanity, then learn how playing an online game called Stall Catchers can help scientists speed up Alzheimer’s research. Then, test your knowledge with Curiosity Challenge trivia questions. A new study tried to build the perfect swear word by Kelsey Donk Neuroskeptic. (2020, March 3…
 
Learn about why people can’t help but “shoot the messenger;” how neurons in your gut influence neurons in your brain thanks to the gut-brain axis; and why we still use the QWERTY keyboard, along with information on Dvorak and Colemak layouts. People can't help but "shoot the messenger" by Kelsey Donk We Really Do Shoot the Messengers of Bad News, R…
 
Learn about how astronauts may build the first moon base with help from their own urine; how musicians and audiences synchronize their brain activity; and more than you ever thought you wanted to know about narwhal tusks. Astronauts may use their own urine to help build the first moon base by Cameron Duke Astronaut urine to build moon bases. (2020)…
 
Learn about the Battle of Puebla, the real reason why we celebrate Cinco de Mayo; how placebos of psychedelics can have psychedelic effects; and how early career choices may influence your personality. What You Think You Know About Cinco De Mayo Is Wrong by Reuben Westmaas History.com Editors. (2010, March 3). Outnumbered Mexican army defeats Frenc…
 
Learn why coffee tastes bad when you reheat it; and how researchers found the ancestor of most living animals. Stand-up mathematician Matt Parker will also explain why the word “null” causes so many problems for computer programmers. Why does coffee taste bad when you reheat it? by Andrea Michelson Shields, J. (2017, April 14). Can Science Explain …
 
Learn about a bias in your brain that makes you ignore security warnings; why people who fall in love feel like they’ve known each other for years; and a crew of prehistoric monkeys that crossed the Atlantic Ocean on rafts. You ignore more than just your browser security warnings because of "warning fatigue" by Grant Currin Waugh, R. (2013, July 15…
 
Learn about why people are less likely to verify their sources on social media; and why it’s a huge deal that researchers found an intermediate-mass black hole. We’ll also debunk five myths about the coronavirus. Jumbling of sources on social media makes you less likely to verify their validity by Kelsey Donk The Ohio State University. (2020, March…
 
Learn about why housecats are deadlier for local wildlife than wild predators; why soft drinks taste better from a can than they do from a plastic bottle (especially when it comes to Cody and his Mountain Dew habits); and how astronomers just found 100 new minor planets beyond Neptune. Housecats have up to 10x larger effect on local wildlife than w…
 
Learn about how ultra-processed food took over your shopping cart; which you lose first, brain or brawn; and how bats are showing resistance to a once deadly white-nose syndrome epidemic. The perils of ultra-processed food by Kelsey Donk Monteiro, C. A., Cannon, G., Moubarac, J.-C., Levy, R. B., Louzada, M. L. C., & Jaime, P. C. (2017). The UN Deca…
 
Learn about how drugs like Ritalin and Adderall actually make you “focus,” how tech companies are using lava lamps to make computers more secure, and why new life discovered at the bottom of the ocean opens up new possibilities for finding life on Mars. Scientists figured out how Ritalin actually makes you focus by Grant Currin Ritalin and similar …
 
Learn about fun (but practical) tips for surviving a quarantine from psychologist Renée Lertzman and “Deadliest Catch” Captains Sig Hansen and Keith Colburn. Plus: learn about why we have birthmarks. Why do we have birthmarks? by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Taha) Germ layer | biology | Britannica. (2020). In Encyclopædia Britannica. https:…
 
Learn about how screeching tape travels at supersonic speeds when you peel it; how Americans are aging more slowly than ever; how the HAMMER spacecraft could save our planet from killer asteroids; and why there are mirrors next to elevators. How screeching tape travels at supersonic speeds by Cameron Duke Yuen Yiu. (2019, February 27). The Superson…
 
Dr. Renée Lertzman will help you understand uncertainty and how to work through the feelings you might be feeling thanks to the coronavirus pandemic. You’ll also learn why one dog year doesn’t equal seven human years. One Dog Year Doesn't Equal Seven Human Years by Ashley Hamer The Seven-Year Glitch. (2008, August 29). WSJ; The Wall Street Journal.…
 
Captains Keith Colburn and Sig Hansen from the award-winning documentary series “Deadliest Catch” share some surprising science lessons from the fishing world. Plus: learn about the psychology behind “sour grapes.” When people can't get something they want, they decide it's not worthy of desire by Kelsey Donk Sjåstad, H., Baumeister, R. F., & Ent, …
 
Stand-up mathematician Matt Parker explains real-life “salami slicing” attacks like the one in the movie Office Space. You’ll also learn about how Tylenol can help ease the pain of social rejection; and why you probably don’t know the back of your hand very well at all. Tylenol and forgiveness may ease the pain of social exclusion by Grant Currin H…
 
Learn about how scientists are predicting viral content by measuring people’s brain activity; how Tuvan throat singers are able to produce two notes at once; and how effective facemasks are in preventing the spread of the coronavirus. How our brains forecast what goes viral online by Kelsey Donk Stanford researchers find our brains are powerful – b…
 
Learn about why you eat differently when you’re stressed; how humpback whales use “bubble nets” to catch fish; and the surprising genetic reason why females outlive males. Why do we eat differently when stressed? by Steffie Drucker How to Manage Stress Eating (or Not Eating). (2020, March 25). The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/25/…
 
Learn about the perception-adoption model, which says that most parents don’t pass their political ideology to their kids; how researchers found the source of peanut allergies in the human gut; and Olbers’ Paradox, which asks why the night sky is so dark if stars are so bright. Most parents don't successfully transmit their political ideology to th…
 
Learn about why signaling your status makes it harder to make new friends; the evolutionary reason why humans have so much back pain; and how pretending to understand babies can make them smarter. Signaling your status makes it harder to make new friends by Steffie Drucker Forget the bling: High status-signaling deters new friendships. (2018, Augus…
 
Learn about when you’re most likely to feel hangry (and how to avoid it); what scientists can learn from watching the human brain jiggle; and how resonant frequencies helped a fitness class shake an entire skyscraper — with help from stand-up mathematician Matt Parker. Scientists Determined When Hanger Is Most Likely to Strike by Annie Hartman http…
 
KidReadz! is a podcast that features audiobooks for kids of all ages. Created by working moms who needed a simple and free way to stream audio on long car rides, the show features books from in the public domain and more. We're always looking for new books from authors who want to offer their creations for free and open listening. This episode feat…
 
Learn about why bats are the source of so many deadly virus outbreaks; and the surprisingly strong influence older siblings can have on their brothers and sisters — just in time for Siblings Day. Then, test your knowledge from this podcast with a Curiosity Challenge trivia game. Why bats are the source of so many deadly virus outbreaks by Andrea Mi…
 
Learn about how to cope with “anticipatory grief” you’re probably feeling during the coronavirus pandemic; the controversy around Oculudentavis khaungraae, which may be the smallest dinosaur ever discovered; and how researchers discovered that music and speech are encoded in separate brain hemispheres. When you mourn something before you've lost it…
 
Beth Pratt, leader of the Save LA Cougars campaign, explains how wildlife crossings work and the unique engineering behind the Liberty Canyon Wildlife Crossing. Plus: learn how doing one creative thing every day can boost your happiness. Additional resources from Beth Pratt, California Regional Executive Director for the National Wildlife Federatio…
 
Beth Pratt, leader of the Save LA Cougars campaign, tells the story of mountain lion P-22 and how he inspired a campaign to build the world’s largest wildlife crossing. Plus: learn about the health benefits of the helper’s high you get when you volunteer. Ever Experienced A "Helper's High"? There's A Reason For That by Anna Todd https://curiosity.c…
 
Learn about why things taste bad after you brush your teeth; a new discovery about how fast the Earth formed that may mean good things about life in the universe; and why women may experience more pain than men. Why does toothpaste make food taste bad? by Andrea Michelson Schultz, C. (2014, October 13). The Science of Why Toothpaste Makes Food Tast…
 
Learn about the shocking prevalence of torture scenes in movies; why durian, the world’s smelliest fruit, smells so bad; and where mold comes from. Torture is prevalent and effective in movies (but not in real life) by Kelsey Donk Torture Prevalent, Effective in Popular Movies, Study Finds – University of Alabama News | The University of Alabama. (…
 
Learn about how your lover’s clothing could improve your sleep; how astronauts grew vegetables in space for the first time; and ancient animals that were connected by a crude version of the internet. Smelling your lover’s shirt could improve your sleep by Kelsey Donk 3 Reasons to Give Your Valentine a Smelly, Unwashed T-Shirt. (2020). Psychology To…
 
Learn about why hundreds of ducks are employees at a wine vineyard; a musical invention that was the Spotify of the Victorian era; and a delicious mathematical principle known as the ham sandwich theorem. Hundreds of Ducks Are Employees at a Vineyard by Joanie Faletto https://curiosity.com/topics/hundreds-of-ducks-are-employees-at-a-vineyard-curios…
 
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