show episodes
 
Historian Professor Barbara Brookes joins Sonja Tiernan, Eamon Cleary Professor of Irish Studies at the University of Otago, to canvass wide aspects of the past - from individual stories to national histories. from political events to emotional tides. Sponsored by the Eamon Cleary Trust through the Centre for Irish and Scottish Studies, University of Otago.
 
We're a podcast for anyone who writes. Every week we talk to writers about their writing journeys and techniques, from early career debuts to self-publishers and narrative designers. We've featured Margaret Atwood, Jackie Kay, Sara Collins, Antti Tuomainen, Val McDermid, Sarah Perry, Elif Shafak and many more!Brought to you by the National Centre for Writing at Dragon Hall in Norwich.
 
Join host Sean Rice (Second Clarinet, NAC Orchestra) as he explores the world of classical music and its great composers. In this series of audio programmes you can look forward to hearing insightful commentary about upcoming NAC Orchestra programmes as well as musical excerpts and interviews with NACO musicians and guest artists.
 
Some of the biggest and most influential names in modern literature, art, music and performance share their stories, thoughts and ideas. In this podcast you'll hear us in conversation with the people shaping arts and culture today. Southbank Centre is home to Royal Festival hall, Hayward Gallery, Queen Elizabeth Hall, Purcell Room and the National Poetry Library. Our podcasts reflect our richly diverse events, exhibitions and festivals programme featuring artists and thinkers from around the ...
 
Welcome to The Human Rights Podcast from the Irish Centre for Human Rights at the National University of Ireland, Galway. Here at the Centre, we are fortunate to be visited each year by an array of world-leading practitioners, researchers and policy-makers in the field of human rights and its associated disciplines. We also have a vibrant community at the ICHR and more broadly in NUI Galway of academic staff, postdoctoral and doctoral scholars, and postgraduate and undergraduate students foc ...
 
The Poetry Society was founded in 1909 to promote "a more general recognition and appreciation of poetry". Since then, it has grown into one of Britain's most dynamic arts organisations, representing British poetry both nationally and internationally. Today it has more than 4000 members worldwide and publishes the leading poetry magazine, The Poetry Review. With innovative education and commissioning programmes and a packed calendar of performances, readings and competitions, the Poetry Soci ...
 
Subscribe now to hear Janice McDonald have Inspiring Conversations with Fearless Women who are trailblazers in business, arts and culture, politics and more. Listen as they share their stories, the challenges and insights into how they’ve been driven to change the world and make it a better place, in whatever arena they are competing in.
 
One of Canada’s best political analysts, Paul Wells, sits down with leading political figures and social influencers for a conversation on the most compelling issues and news of the day. The monthly series is produced by CPAC in partnership with Maclean’s and the National Arts Centre. Maclean’s magazine senior writer Paul Wells is one of Canada’s leading political journalists. In nearly a quarter century on Parliament Hill he has covered four prime ministers and seven federal elections. His ...
 
The Goblin Podcast is a kid's podcast featuring original musical stories, from acclaimed children's theatre makers. Each episode we’ll be bringing you new musical stories for the whole family to enjoy wherever you like. Our stories are full of catchy new songs and a lot of fun that will inspire the imagination of all ages. From The Legend of the Jazz Penguin (a musical adventure about a little Penguin looking for her sound) to Hey Diddle Diddle (a celebration of nonsense based on the nursery ...
 
Emotions shape individual, community and national identities. The ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (CHE) uses historical knowledge from Europe, 1100=1800, to understand the long history of emotional behaviours. Based at The University of Western Australia, with additional nodes at the Universities of Adelaide, Melbourne, Queensland and Sydney, CHE investigates how European societies thought, felt and functioned, and how these changes impact life in Australia today. More a ...
 
A podcast in Scottish Gaelic from the National Centre for Gaelic Language and Culture, Sabhal Mòr Ostaig. This podcast is about language, history and culture - meeting interesting people and hearing good stories on the way. 'S e Ionad Nàiseanta Cànan agus Cultur na Gàidhlig a th' ann an Sabhal Mòr Ostaig agus anns am podchraol seo, tha sinn a' toirt blasad dhuibh air na tha dol ann an saoghal an t-Sabhail.
 
Dubliners is a collection of 15 short stories by James Joyce, first published in 1914. They form a naturalistic depiction of Irish middle class life in and around Dublin in the early years of the 20th century. The stories were written when Irish nationalism was at its peak and a search for a national identity and purpose was raging; at a crossroads of history and culture, Ireland was jolted by various converging ideas and influences. They centre on Joyce's idea of an epiphany: a moment where ...
 
Welcome to National Treasures! Tag along with comedians Laura Lexx and Will Duggan for a day out at some of nation's finest attractions. Castles, stately homes, ruins, art galleries and museums. Listen as they stumble through muddy fields, hallowed halls and half-remembered historical facts. It’s like an audio tour… only narrated by two idiots.
 
How did the NAC Orchestra become the world class organization it is today? Veteran broadcaster Eric Friesen chronicles the unfolding drama of the NAC Orchestra from its earliest days in 1969 to the present time. With his charming personality and a host of probing questions, he interviews conductors, orchestral musicians, guest artists and administrators about the Orchestra’s beginnings, the challenges it faced, the tours it made all over Canada and to many foreign lands, and the kind of indi ...
 
The moon has held a special place in cultures across the globe. An object of mystical wonder and focus of scientific inquiry, the moon is an enduring subject for artists, poets and writers. To land on the moon represented not only a remarkable technological achievement, but one that created in human history a shared moment of optimism. An achievement for human ambition and scientific discovery, born out of the geopolitical competition between nations. The ANU College of Arts and Social Scien ...
 
Antoine Compagnon, born on July 20, 1950 in Brussels, has been professor of "Modern and Contemporary French Literature: history, criticism, and theory" at the Collège de France since 2006. He has also been Professor of French and Comparative Literature at Columbia University in New York since 1985, holding the "Blanche W. Knopf" chair since 1991. Formerly a student at the École Polytechnique (1970), and an engineer from the Ponts et Chaussées engineering school (1975), he was awarded a PhD i ...
 
Discussions with people working in the arts,business, academia and civil society in South Africa. Listen to new perspectives on issues of race, gender and transformation. The host, Nicholas Claude, is a freelance writer based in Johannesburg. He was born in London, raised in Durban and returned to South Africa in 2010 after living in Stockholm for thirteen years. To support the podcast go to https://www.patreon.com/voicesfromsa
 
Until 1918 the extensive palatial complex at the heart of Vienna was the political centre of the monarchy. Today it fulfills the same role for the democratic Republic of Austria. The rooms where the Congress of Vienna met and danced and where Emperor Franz Joseph held audiences, now houses the offices of the Federal President, the ministers of the chancellor’s office and the secretaries of state. This sprawling, asymmetric complex of building with its 19 courtyards and 18 wings is also home ...
 
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show series
 
**This episode was originally published on July 10, 2020*** The Indigenous Theatre program at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa was just wrapping up it's very successful first season when COVID-19 hit. It's artistic director Kevin Loring talks with National Chief Perry Bellegarde about the challenges he faces in overcoming the COVID shutdown, what…
 
On today's show, more memories of late Bart Jack Senior. Also, childcare is getting cheaper, but as we told you Friday, the people staffing day cares say they can barely afford to get by. We hear what those workers are facing. More family physicians wanted. The Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association tells us why attracting doctors to Labrado…
 
This year’s autumn run of Jewish holy days has been like no other; but even with coronavirus-related restrictions in place, food and community has remained at the heart of celebrations for Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Sukkot. Leyla Kazim hears from a socially distanced Sukkot meal in North London, follows a festival food diary from a family in Man…
 
On 27th December 2020 we’re doing a special live performance of our Christmas show The Ballad of Rudy at the iconic and jazzy Live at Zedel in London’s Piccadilly. We will be streaming the show live at 3pm (GMT), and it will be available for 48 hours afterwards. There will also be a small number of tickets available for the live performance. The Ba…
 
On today's show, we bring you the letter "w" in the Encyclopedia of Labrador which is all about waste. We also find out what you can do with all those recyclables that are piling up in your basement or that you've been stashing in your shed. Parents in NL are all in favour of affordable child care, but what happens when there isn't enough staff to …
 
Almost the first words in new Green Party leader Annamie Paul's victory speech, spoke of solidarity with Canada's First Nations: "As the descendant of the black diaspora who has suffered its own history of oppression and colonialism, I will always stand with indigenous peoples and their calls to action, and their calls to justice and their fight fo…
 
Imagine greenhouses that produce food using just sunshine and sea-water. In Australia and Africa they’re already a reality. We talk to one of the pioneers of the concept. Also, the latest research on the so-called “insect apocalypse”. And, the new aviation prize open to any enterprising spirit able to cross the Atlantic in a plane powered entirely …
 
On today's show, we pay tribute to the late Bart Jack Senior, a well-known and respected Innu elder. It's been about a week of frustration for many residents in Cartwright after phone and internet lines have been destroyed by blasting. We check-in on how things are going. We hear from Bennett's Limited business manager on how the closure of the Ult…
 
Emma Shercliff of Laxfield Literary Associates talks to us about being an agent outside of London and her efforts to better represent both regional writers and authors from Africa and the Middle East. Following a globe-trotting career with Macmillan, Hodder and Cassava Republic Press, encountering the Common People report prompted Emma to set up La…
 
On today's show, Memorial University is hiring a cluster of Indigenous professors. Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure, Derrick Bragg joins us to talk about a new mental health and addictions facility for Labrador and about transportation, of course. A social worker speaks out. We hear the story of Wally Rich, an Innu teen who took his ow…
 
On today's show, bingo night came back to West St Modeste and it brought back a lot of smiles. No news is good news. We haven't heard much about the Kamutik this season. It was delayed a few times so far because of bad weather, but the ship seems to be sailing smoothly through its second year of service. We hear from a satisfied customer. We hear f…
 
Dan Saladino visits shepherd and writer James Rebanks whose farm in Cumbria spans three generations. What does can that history teach us about where food and farming go next?In his latest book English Pastoral: An Inheritance James Rebanks provides an insiders account of the seismic changes to farming from the 1960s to the present day. Farming beca…
 
On today's harvest show, we get a history lesson on farming and gardening in Labrador as we bring you the letter "v" in the Encyclopedia of Labrador. The Labrador Institute is launching its brand new website today for the Pye farm. We find out why they're so excited to share their vision. We get reaction from Joyce Pye and farmer Des Sellars about …
 
On today's show, we're talking butter ball turkeys for Thanksgiving dinner. St-Lewis residents have opted for less service but more peace of mind. Starting today they will be down one nurse at the clinic. We tell you what's in place to help the community. We check out what Labrador Grenfell's Medical of Officer of Health is growing at his home in H…
 
Want to be a more organised writer? On the pod this week we have Antony Johnston, prolific and bestselling creator of comics, novels, podcasts and more. He created the graphic novel that was turned into the movie Atomic Blonde, has worked extensively on his own comics as well as Marvel books, video games including Dead Space and Shadow of Mordor an…
 
On today's show, Innu Nation is seeking compensation for the destruction of what they call ancestral lands where the Churchill Falls dam was built. They have an agreement with Nalcor but now want Hydro Quebec to pay their share, and they're taking the corporation to court. Johannes Lampe was unofficially elected as President of the Nunatsiavut Gove…
 
On today's show, public health officials in the province are encouraging people to download the COVID Alert app. With snow sprinkling the hills, we find out what's being done to get Smokey Mountain ready for another ski season. It's Talk Tuesday with our MHAs. This morning, we ask questions about the provincial budget, roadwork and Covid-19. We ask…
 
On today's show, we hear about a report from the Atlantic Province's Economic Council that says more Covid support is needed for indigenous businesses and communities. CBC News has been trying to find out more on the latest cases of Covid-19, but details from the health department are scarce. We pull back the curtain to tell you what we know and wh…
 
Biscuits aren’t just a classic accompaniment to a cuppa: they’re also somehow an edible comforter - very often providing a link to childhood, to family, to happy memories. And of course, giving that all-important sugary pick-me-up. All of which goes some way towards explaining why, over just one month of lockdown, the UK spent an extra £19 million …
 
Around the world a growing number of people are choosing cryonics. They opt to be frozen when they die on the speculative hope that one day advancing science will allow them to be ‘reanimated’ and brought back to life. The rising popularity of this new death ritual has led to the creation of a cryonics facility in regional Australia, and a handful …
 
On today's show, a Royal Canadian Air Force helicopter suffered some damage on a tarmac in Saglek, but they aren't looking for a suspect. We bring you the story. We get an update on the septic issue happening in Natuashish. The Nunatsiavut presidential election is right around the corner. We hear from candidate Andrea Webb Tuglavina, as well as pro…
 
Multi-award-winning comics writer Kieron Gillen joins us on the pod today to discuss his methods for world building. Kieron is perhaps best known for The Wicked + The Divine, the hugely ambitious collaboration with artist Jamie McKelvie which presents a pantheon of gods who happen to also be pop stars, as well as UBER, Phonogram, DIE, Once & Future…
 
Grand Chief Alvin Fiddler of Nishnawbe Aski Nation, Treaty 9 territory in Northern Ontario is National Chief Perry Bellegarde's guest. A veteran leader in the fight for a better system of justice for First Nations people, Grand Chief Fiddler and the National Chief discuss the key parts of the Liberal governments Throne Speech, including the importa…
 
With winter directly in our path, this year's seasonal woes may be a lot worse thanks to COVID-19. We speak to wellness expert Louisa Jewell about how you can keep your mental well-being in check. A family in Central Newfoundland got quite a scare when their six-year-old son ate a wild mushroom on the first day of school, then became seriously ill.…
 
It's Orange Shirt Day. Most of our show today brings stories about Labradorians who attended residential schools. We talk about the hardships former students went through, the healing they've embarked on and their desire for history never to repeat itself. We hear from Sarah and Harry Webb in Nain. We go to Cartwright to talk about why the town cou…
 
On today's show, we hear some reaction to news from NALCOR about the impact of COVID-19 on the Muskrat Falls hydro project. Labrador MP Yvonne Jones weighs in on the conversation about the lack of local shrimp quotas for waters adjacent to the Inuit Land Claims Agreement. We also hear from Labrador's four MHAs about issues in their regions. The gas…
 
On today's show, a Filipino family in Happy Valley-Goose Bay shares how they're coping with the loss of a loved one from Covid-19, yet how lucky they feel to live in Labrador where the pandemic hasn’t struck as hard. Gasoline and heating fuel are essential components of life on the coast. But what happens when there is no one to operate the as stat…
 
There’s bipartisan support in the United States for the establishment of a national AI research cloud. So, how would academics benefit and what role would big tech play in its operations? Also, problems with academic inclusivity in the developing world, and could alternative channels of distribution soon rival the primacy of peer-reviewed journals?…
 
On today's show, former students of Labrador's residential schools shared their stories. And now a new book is available to aid in the healing process. We talk with author Andrea Procter and James Igloliorte who provided the forward. The federal throne speech includes plans for something called an "Atlantic Loop". Sort of like an Atlantic Bubble, b…
 
It's a very special episode this week award-winning US author and screenwriter Attica Locke joins us to deliver the annual Noirwich Lecture, in which she explores the ways that crime writing can challenge the distribution of power and authority at a structural and individual level, addressing how power, property and privilege intersect. Attica’s mo…
 
***Ahkameyimok Podcast - Encore Presentation*** **This is interview with Dr. Dan Longboat was originally published on the Akhameyimok Podcast on July 23, 2020. Ahkameyimok returns with a new episode the week of September 24th. ** "Being faced with COVID and the complexity of it, science is just beginning to understand how those things are interconn…
 
Happy Valley is 77 years old and the town is celebrating Covid style, so for our Throwback Thursday we walk down memory lane with one of its founders. More than two thousand pounds of food is being shipped to Nain, We hear from the organiser behind that project. A planet in peril. We'll find out about a new documentary called The Magnitude of All t…
 
On today's show, we talk to a family doctor about the challenges of administering the flu vaccine during a pandemic. Innu elder Elisabeth Penashue tells us why her people need to go back to the land to find some healing. There's a new type of gathering planned for October that will see the province's four indigenous groups sharing traditional knowl…
 
On today's show, the Nunatsiavut Government called out the federal government for increasing shrimp quotas without including them. We hear why. Labrador's four MHAs share thoughts on roads, Covid-19 and other issues in their regions. We get details about a NORAD exercise on the go. The leaves of some birch trees in Upper Melville have already turne…
 
The Manishan Nui Gathering sees hundreds of Innu celebrating their culture for a week long camp out at Gull Island. We hear from two more attendees. Then we turn to Makkovik where its been more than 6 months since the town operated gym has been closed despite the fact that gyms across the province have been opened for weeks now. The AngajukKak tell…
 
March 2020. Supermarket shelves were bare, restaurants and takeaways were closed, schools and workplaces closed. Perhaps it's no surprise then that all around the world, people started getting creative in the kitchen. But as Leyla Kazim finds in this programme, some cooks took lockdown cooking to a whole new level.Warwickshire cook Dan Fell made he…
 
The research community is facing a “crisis of reproducibility”, according to the head of the Center for Open Science, Professor Brian Nosek. He says many of the traditional practices designed to make research robust, actually distort and diminish its effectiveness. In this episode, he details his ideas for reform. We also explore three plausible sc…
 
On today's show, Richard Dyson is taking part in his 40th Terry Fox Run. We find out why the Terry Fox story inspires him to keep going. The Dehavilland Beaver is often referred to as the best bush plane every built. And pilot Jim Burton couldn't agree more. We take you to Otter Creek to learn more about his unique air plane. We hear best wishes fo…
 
This September Brad Regehr made history, becoming the first First Nations President of the Canadian Bar Association. A partner at Maurice Law in Winnipeg, the first and only indigenous owned national law firm in Canada, he has focused on civil litigation, aboriginal, corporate and administrative law. He has represented and advised First Nations cli…
 
RENDANG by Will Harris has been revealed as our new Book Club book! Flo Reynolds returns to the pod to introduce the book and why it's been selected for the book club. They also give some great tips for beginners on how to read poetry, so if you're more used to fiction and non-fiction don't feel like you need to sit this one out. We'll be doing liv…
 
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