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Best New Yorker podcasts we could find (updated June 2020)
Best New Yorker podcasts we could find
Updated June 2020
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From pop stars to memoirs, abstraction to athleisure, Lilah Raptopoulos and Griselda Murray Brown get together to make sense of culture today. Lilah's an editor in New York and Gris is in London – join them as they dissect the trends shaping life in the 2020s, interview people breaking new ground and bring you behind the scenes of the Financial Times' award-winning Life & Arts journalism. Come to hear what’s new in two cultural capitals; stay for compelling interviews that aren't afraid to g ...
 
The economy is bananas, even scary. But some people are thriving, and we're going to figure out how. Adam Davidson, "New Yorker" writer, longtime contributor to This American Life, and the creator of NPR’s "Planet Money," unearths stories from regular people. People who have cracked the code to success in our new economic reality.
 
G Moody is the host of this 5⭐️ star podcast stemming from Brooklyn, NY. Known for his quick wit, hilarious commentary and impeccable ear for great music, G Moody continues to deliver with a unique, intellectual perspective about daily American life, sports, politics and everything in between. A true New Yorker, G Moody genuinely brings a plethora of funny to the podcast game with his articulate, entertaining & always thought-provoking opinions giving you - This, That & The Third. Support th ...
 
Socrates in the City is the acclaimed series of conversations on “life, God, and other small topics,” hosted by Eric Metaxas. Starting with the philosopher Socrates’s famous words that “the unexamined life is not worth living,” Metaxas thought it would be valuable to create a forum that might encourage busy New Yorkers in thinking about the bigger questions in life. He founded Socrates in the City in 2000. Metaxas is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of MARTIN LUTHER, IF YOU CAN KEEP ...
 
RingTales brings the world famous cartoons of The New Yorker to fully animated life. They're short. They're smart. They're wickedly funny. They feature the hysterical work of renowned cartoon artists such as Sam Gross, Bob Mankoff and Roz Chast. Enjoy a bite-sized gift of comic comedy three times a week. Animation that's addictive. You can't watch just one.
 
If you love New York City then this is the podcast for you! Gossipnista seeks to continue enriching the lives of New Yorkers and those looking to visit or move to New York City. Join host Mariana Monks, as she asks all the questions you've ever wanted to know about the Big Apple through interviews with special and expert guest within various fields in New York City. Tune in weekly on Monday's as we pull back the curtain on the city that never sleeps and inspire you to live your best life in ...
 
Every episode, legal expert Andrew and comic relief Thomas will tackle a popular legal topic and give you all the tools you need to understand the issue and win every argument you have on Facebook, with your Uncle Frank, or wherever someone is wrong on the Internet. It's law. It's politics. It's fun. We don't tell you what to think, we just set up the Opening Arguments.
 
When we hear about confidence games, we think, “never me.” Welcome to The Grift, a show about con artists and the lives they ruin. Best-selling author and New Yorker writer Maria Konnikova takes us to the darker side of human nature and deceit. Ten stories about card sharks, cult leaders, art forgers, impostors, and more. Why do we fall for them time and time again?
 
To get away from city life periodically, New Yorker Roger Locke purchases an abandoned farm house in rural Connecticut, and with the assistance of his cousin Phillida and her beau Ethan Vere, he sets about fixing up the place. Immediately however, an unseen mysterious woman begins giving him warnings during nocturnal visits to leave the house at once. Soon he begins hearing strange ominous sounds emanating from the tiny lake at the back of the house coupled with a permeation of sickly odors. ...
 
The Last Archive​ is a show about the history of truth, and the historical context for our current fake news, post-truth moment. It’s a show about how we know what we know, and why it seems, these days, as if we don’t know anything at all anymore. The show is driven by host Jill Lepore’s work as a historian, uncovering the secrets of the past the way a detective might.
 
Hamburg is a familiar and award-winning voice in New York radio, best known for her years spent as host of “The Joan Hamburg Show” which was widely considered to be “The Today Show” of radio. At 77 WABC, Hamburg will continue discussing the most important social, economic and political issues that impact listeners’ lives each week. Known as New York’s “First Lady of Radio,” Hamburg was inducted into the New York State Broadcasters’ Hall of Fame in 2012 and has been named “New Yorker of the Y ...
 
A podcast by a native New Yorker & crazy Colombian who loves to talk about Daily Events • TV • Movies • Celebs • and Life! Follow @itsjessnyc on IG, FB, TWITTER, LINKEDIN & TUMBLRNew Episodes when I feel like it 💋 #itsjessnyc #LifeWithJess ⏬ Visit my website & blog
 
Our lives can be crazy, but you can take a break from it all with Wondery’s new series, Even the Rich, where co-hosts Brooke Siffrinn and Aricia Skidmore-Williams pull back the curtain and chat about someone else’s craziness for a change. They tell stories about some of the greatest family dynasties in history, from the Murdochs to the Royals to the Carters (Jay-Z and Beyoncé, that is). Because as Queen Elizabeth once said, “A good gossip is a wonderful tonic.”
 
Sixty-three essays on a variety of topics as wide apart as Family Life in America, Opera Synopses, Bigamy, International Finance and many more, Love Conquers All by Robert Benchley strangely enough does not touch upon romance at all! However, these delightful notes provide hours of browsing pleasure for young and old readers alike. Robert Benchley was a well-known humorist and newspaper columnist, radio and television presenter, actor, scriptwriter and broadcaster. He is also credited with c ...
 
Edith Wharton's 1907 novella explores the milieu of Americans living abroad in Paris. New Yorker John Durham travels to Paris to woo an old flame, Fanny Frisbee, now the Marquis de Malrive. Fanny is separated from her husband and wants to marry John and return to America, but she doubts whether her Catholic husband will grant her a divorce. When John meets Fanny's sister-in-law, the enigmatic Madame de Treymes, he hopes she may be able to help them in their quest for happiness. (Introduction ...
 
Trampoline Hall is a barroom lecture series that has been delighting audiences every month in Toronto for fifteen years, where it has sold out every show. Praised by The New Yorker for “celebrating eccentricity and do-it-yourself inventiveness,” it asks lecturers to take a vulnerable, theatrical risk and speak on a subject they’re not professionally expert in. Subjects range from absurd and arcane obsessions to heartbreakingly personal stories. Quick-witted host Misha Glouberman conducts a Q ...
 
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show series
 
Mark Cuban identifies as a capitalist, but the billionaire investor, “Shark Tank” star, and Dallas Mavericks owner has been advocating for changes that point to a different kind of politics. Cuban tells Sheelah Kolhatkar that the economic crisis now requires massive government investment to stabilize the economy from the bottom up; he’s pushing a f…
 
Peter Hessler has been in one of the strictest COVID-19 lockdowns in the world: starting in January, he was quarantined with his family in Chengdu, China, presaging what life would soon look like in America. Now, as restrictions lift in China, Hessler says that the experiences of the two countries have diverged. China’s government spent the lockdow…
 
Bryan Washington joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “U.F.O. in Kushiro,” by Haruki Murakami, which first appeared in a 2001 issue of the magazine and was then republished in 2011, after an earthquake and tsunami devastated northern Japan. Washington’s début story collection, “Lot,” was published last year, and his first novel, “Memorial,” w…
 
Jelani Cobb is a professor, historian, and staff writer for The New Yorker, where he covers race and politics. He joins us to discuss the “dimension and contours” of this moment in America (6:00), the intersection of Amy Cooper's phone call and George Floyd's death (12:05), how to engage those with whom you disagree (18:30), Ahmaud Arbery and the a…
 
This week, Lilah talks to Liana Finck, a graphic novelist and New Yorker cartoonist with a fan base on Instagram that’s half a million strong. Liana is known for her funny and astute explorations of what it means to be human. She talks about how to free yourself up to be creative in quarantine, where confidence comes from, the most interesting huma…
 
In the first of a series of episodes, Eric explores JD Salinger's history in the magazine as he recounts his own experiences reading Salinger and tries to figure out the impact that New Yorker editors Gus Lobrano and William Maxwell had on the writer. Eric speaks with Ben Yagoda, author of ABOUT TOWN: THE NEW YORKER AND THE WORLD IT MADE about Sali…
 
We thought we knew everything about the Murdochs. Then we met Ken Auletta. He's one of the best media reporters in the biz — four decades at The New Yorker, a handful of bestsellers under his belt, and quite a few encounters with the Murdochs along the way. He tells us what the family is like up close, and what the future holds for their diminished…
 
Today's episode takes a deep dive into H.R. 965, which (quite sensibly) permits proxy voting in the House of Representatives in light of the COVID-19 crisis, and the lawsuit filed by various Republican lawmakers to try and stop it. Good news! The lawsuit has no chance of success thanks to... litigation prompted by Donald Trump. We begin, however, w…
 
Today's emergency episode breaks down everything you need to know about the death of George Floyd and the charges filed against Officer Derek Chauvin in Minnesota. Patreon Bonuses We’ve got an all-new Live Q&A scheduled for Sunday, May 31 at 7 pm Eastern / 4 pm Pacific, and Patrons can click here to suggest questions and vote on the ones they want …
 
Since January, Peter Hessler has reported from China under quarantine. Now, as restrictions lift, he tells David Remnick about his return to normal life; recently, he even went to a dance club. But, although China’s stringent containment measures were effective enough to allow a rapid reopening, one scientist told Hessler, “There is no long-term pl…
 
Distinguished Fellow of The Center for Bioethics, physician, and Consulting Professor in the Department of Neurobiology at Stanford University Medical Center William Hurlbut explores how dramatic advances in molecular biology and human biology have resulted in inquiry that raises questions about the relationship between the material form and the mo…
 
Today's episode breaks down the latest temper tantrum and accompanying executive order by our game show host president attacking social media platforms for having the temerity to engage in fact-checking. You're going to be hearing a lot about "Section 230" -- so we're here to tell you exactly what that means, what Trump is trying to do, and why it …
 
Bryan Curtis and David Shoemaker discuss Trump’s latest allegations against Joe Scarborough and the supporters “urging him to stop" (1:35). Then listener mail, including the question “Will we ever again get a 'DAVID…' opener from Bryan before the intro music?” (19:05). Lastly, Curtis is joined by Rob Mahoney, sports writer at The Ringer, to explore…
 
Just a month ago, experts were predicting that the American economy would be slow to recover from the pandemic. Unemployment remains at record highs, but, as the country begins to reopen, federal policies that have bolstered small businesses and bailed out big ones seem to have helped avoid another Great Depression. John Cassidy joins Dorothy Wicke…
 
In the midst of a global pandemic, two artists emerge with new projects. Art for your hearts and minds. First we call up multi-hyphenate talent Terence Nance (4:07), known for his HBO series Random Acts of Flyness, to discuss his healing debut EP: Things I Never Had. After that we ring up director Malik Vitthal (31:00). His new film, Body Cam, star…
 
Beyoncé and Jay-Z. They’re not just the first family of hip-hop: they also remind us that magical, luminous, what-I-would-give-to-have-that love really does exist. That’s why this season we’re telling you the story of how two of the biggest stars on the planet came together, launched a billion-dollar music empire, and almost lost it all. In this ep…
 
Today's episode brings back AG of the Mueller She Wrote and Daily Beans podcasts to help delve in to all the craziness that is #Obamagate. And, as a bonus, we also discuss the five Inspectors General fired by Trump and what they were investigating. You won't want to miss this special episode! As it turns out, #Obamagate is nonsense. Who knew? After…
 
Bryan Curtis and David Shoemaker discuss the veepstakes that includes Elizabeth Warren, Stacey Abrams, and Amy Klobuchar (1:35). They touch on the seemingly endless cycle of sports documentaries (21:40), and then talk with 'Daily Beast' reporter Will Sommer, who gives the inside scoop on the QAnon conspiracy theory (33:10). Plus, the Overworked Twi…
 
When he was eighteen, Abie Rohrig decided that he wanted to donate a kidney to save the life of a stranger who needed it. At twenty, he put his name on a list of volunteers for a human-challenge trial that would test the efficacy of a COVID-19 vaccine. A human-challenge trial for a vaccine would be nearly unprecedented: it would entail giving subje…
 
When schools were closed owing to the coronavirus outbreak, the English teacher Petria May did the most natural thing she could think of: she assigned her tenth-grade class to read Albert Camus’s novel “The Plague,” which describes a quarantine during an outbreak of disease. Plus, a short story by Peter Cameron. In “Memorial Day,” a teen-age boy is…
 
For the last 20 years, journalist Brooke Gladstone has been making sense of the news. Her Peabody-winning show, On the Media, says to examine the “myths and media narratives that shape our worldview—for better or for worse”. This week Brooke join us to put this moment of ours in context. We discuss her ability to “take the long view”, the need for …
 
Abie Roehrig, a twenty-year-old undergraduate, has put his name on a list of volunteers for a human-challenge trial to test the efficacy of a COVID-19 vaccine. A human-challenge trial for a vaccine would be nearly unprecedented: it would entail giving subjects a candidate vaccine against the virus, and then infecting them deliberately to test its e…
 
Today's episode checks in on all the latest goings-on in the Trump administration that probably don't violate the law but do undermine the norms of 200+ years of government, from firing Inspectors General that are potentially interested in government accountability to the DOJ's refusal to turn over the unredacted Mueller Report to the House Judicia…
 
Bryan Curtis and David Shoemaker break down Trump’s claims against Obama and what he refers to as “Obamagate” (1:30) as well as the 'Call Her Daddy' podcast feud that has Dave Portnoy taking over the show, social media, and merch (including a “Cancel Suitman” hoodie) (23:00). Next is Listener Mail, where Bryan and David answer the question “If you …
 
Iran’s Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Khamanei, has failed to cover up the extent of damage posed to the country by the coronavirus crisis. Dexter Filkins travelled to Iran in February, just as the outbreak was metastasizing. He joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss what Iranian doctors and young dissidents told him, and why people think this could be a br…
 
EP 81 - OXYGEN The Pyramid of Podcasting is BACK!!!RATE & REVIEW this 5🌟Star Podcast while your sheltered in place, Let's get into it... The NYC Ice Cream Truck Racist Jingle, the corona correspondent talks the lifestyle distinctions of Downtown vs Uptown New Yorkers, Designer Masks, Condolences to the Georgia Jogger, the Necessity of Sunrays & Fre…
 
James Poniewozik, watches TV all day and gets paid for it. Dream job, right? James is the chief TV critic at the New York Times. He’s also the author of “Audience of One: Trump, Television, and the Fracturing of America.” On this episode, he explains how Rupert Murdoch brought a tabloid sensibility to cable news. Then we talk “Succession.” The Murd…
 
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