show episodes
 
Showcasing major breakthroughs in the field, Project Oncology® educates and assists the heroes who dedicate their lives to pioneering new advancements in the war against cancer. Hear from leading oncologists as they discuss essential screening and diagnostic tools, emerging therapies, counseling strategies, and more.
 
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show series
 
Host: Jacob Sands, MD Cancer care has evolved since the initial outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. What do we need to know about caring for our cancer patients during this winter season? Dr. Jacob Sands, Thoracic Medical Oncologist at the Dana-Farber Institute in Boston shares what cancer patients can do to take care of themselves during the winter…
 
Guest: Mariana Chavez MacGregor, MD, MSC The healthcare disparity crisis in the breast cancer field has prevented the benefits of therapeutic advancements from being equally distributed throughout all populations. What can we do to overcome this obstacle? Dr. Mariana Chavez MacGregor, Associate Professor at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cance…
 
On Wednesday, January 6, 2021, as legislators counted and confirmed the votes in the Electoral College, rioters breached the Capitol building, forcing an evacuation of the House floor, including Vice President Pence. The events unfolded amidst President Trump having urged his supporters to fight against the ceremonial counting of the votes. The rio…
 
Guest: Christopher Lathan, MD, MS, MPH Healthcare professionals have found that zip code is a better indicator of health for many patients rather than cholesterol or genetics, highlighting a significant disparity in the field of medicine. What can we do to overcome this obstacle? Dr. Christopher Lathan, Associate Medical Director of the Dana Farber…
 
Host: Jacob Sands, MD Guest: Christopher Lathan, MD, MS, MPH Oftentimes, a patient’s zip code is a better indicator of health than blood pressure or genetics, highlighting a significant disparity among communities. How are barriers such as systemic racism contributing to this disparity, and what can we do to change that? Dr. Jacob Sands is joined b…
 
Host: Jacob Sands, MD Guest: Taofeek K. Owonikoko, MD, PhD, MSCR After years without new approvals, advancements in small cell lung cancer are at the forefront of oncology. But what do these therapeutic developments mean for the field? Dr. Taofeek Owonikoko, professor and vice-chair for faculty development in the Department of Hematology and Medica…
 
Host: Jacob Sands, MD Guest: Nabil F. Saba, MD Emerging research on head and neck cancer has moved away from HPV-negative diseases upon the discovery of HPV-positive diseases, specifically HPV-positive oropharynx cancer. What do we know about managing and treating this disease? Dr. Nabile Saba dives into treatment considerations, specifically immun…
 
Host: Jacob Sands, MD Guest: Nabil F. Saba, MD Since head and neck cancer is still to a large extent a surgical disease, the COVID-19 pandemic had an immediate impact on its management. Here to share how he pivoted his approach and how the pandemic might impact the future of head and neck cancer care is Dr. Nabil Saba, a Professor and Vice Chair fo…
 
Host: Edward Chu, MD Guest: Michael J. Overman, MD Recent immunotherapy approvals have changed the treatment paradigm for first and subsequent lines of treatment for patients with microsatellite-high or mismatch repair deficient metastatic colorectal cancer. Join us as we deep dive into recent and newly emergent data to better understand how to bri…
 
Host: Jennifer Caudle, DO Guest: Suma Satti, MD Small cell lung cancer is an aggressive form of lung cancer, and until recently therapeutic options have been limited. Joining Dr. Jennifer Caudle to discuss the role of immunotherapy in combination with chemotherapy in the treatment of this devastating disease as well as recent data from a clinical t…
 
Host: Jacob Sands, MD Guest: Therese T. Bevers, MD Fear of the COVID-19 pandemic has led to added safety precautions that have prevented patients from receiving much-needed cancer screenings. How will this impact the field of oncology, and what can we do to encourage patients to get their screenings? Dr. Therese Beavers, Medical Director of the Can…
 
The worldwide scale and scope of discontinuity, loss, and uncertainty has made the year of the pandemic like no other in recent memory. How are we processing this moment, and how do we move forward? In this episode, we talk to three students, who share how the COVID crisis has reshaped their undergraduate experience at Penn and their visions for th…
 
Host: Paul P. Doghramji, MD, FAAFP Guest: Corey S. Cutler, MD, MPH, FRCPC Guest: Doris M. Ponce, MD Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a common complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Although systemic corticosteroids are traditional first-line treatment for aGVHD, …
 
COVID-19 wasn’t the only health crisis of 2020. In June, the American Medical Association and the American Public Health Association declared that police violence, particularly against Black and brown communities, is a public health crisis that demands attention and action. Widespread protests drew attention this summer, but where do we go from the…
 
Host: Stephen Cohen, MD Guest: Thomas C. Wright, Jr., MD Regardless of the cervical cancer screening (CCS) approach used, effective triage tests are needed to improve diagnostic evaluation. An ideal screening and triage approach should identify as many precancerous lesions as possible while referring as few women as possible to colposcopy. Learn ho…
 
With rates of diagnoses and death disproportionately affecting racial minorities and low-income workers, experts in this episode address how COVID-19 has further exposed already dire health outcome inequalities. We begin with a political scientist discussing how governmental policy drives health inequality, especially during times of crisis. Then, …
 
Host: Robert Mocharnuk, MD Guest: Richard S. Finn, MD Guest: Amit Singal, MD, MS The majority of patients with HCC have advanced disease at diagnosis and aren’t candidates for potentially curative treatment options, such as resection, liver transplantation, or ablation. Advances in immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy are transforming the way clinic…
 
The coronavirus pandemic does not exist in a vacuum. We look at other urgent issues of our time, and examine how they affect and are affected by COVID-19. We start this episode—as most things seem to now—with the partisan polarization in the U.S., asking a political science professor if people really are seeing everything in red or blue. Then a his…
 
Details from the yellow fever epidemic of 1793 or the quarantines during the bubonic plague sound familiar today. In our second episode, we talk to historians about how past societies dealt with disease, and what happened when a new understanding of germs revolutionized our approach but led us to overlook the larger picture of health. A legal histo…
 
“In these times” has been a handy turn of phrase in 2020, with varying adjectives used to modify it. Challenging. Unique. Strange. What started as a useful shorthand for the COVID-19 pandemic and the surreal nature of stay-at-home orders became used describe world-wide protests and calls for racial justice. This fall, the OMNIA podcast goes beyond …
 
Host: Scott Kopetz, MD, PhD Guest: Prof Eric Van Cutsem, MD, PhD Dr. Scott Kopetz and Prof. Eric Van Cutsem evaluate both the initial and updated pivotal outcomes from the BEACON trial in second- and third-line BRAF V600E-mutated metastatic colorectal cancer. They extend their discussion of these practice-changing results to include the early-stage…
 
Host: Scott Kopetz, MD, PhD Guest: Prof Eric Van Cutsem, MD, PhD Guest: Josep Tabernero, MD, PhD Dr. Scott Kopetz, Prof. Eric Van Cutsem, and Dr. Josep Tabernero engage in a panel discussion with a focus on the practice-changing initial and subsequently updated mature findings from the BEACON trial. These pivotal findings alter the standard of care…
 
Host: Richard T. Penson, MD, MRCP Guest: Linda R. Duska, MD, MPH There remains a critical unmet need for effective therapies following the recurrence of endometrial cancer. In this activity, Drs. Linda Duska and Richard Penson assess the role of immunotherapy and targeted therapies in managing advanced endometrial cancers, as well as the importance…
 
Host: Mark A. Socinski, MD Guest: Alexander Drilon, MD There are now multiple biomarker-defined patient subgroups in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including RET rearrangements, and there is growing evidence that treatment with targeted therapies has significant clinical outcomes. In response to current rapid changes in the field of N…
 
Host: Sara Hurvitz, MD Guest: Jacob Sands, MD Anti-HER2 therapy is well established as a first-line approach for many patients with metastatic breast cancer. HER2 has now been identified as an oncogenic driver across multiple malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and gastric cancer. Dr. Sara A. Hurvitz and Dr. Jacob…
 
Host: Mark A. Socinski, MD Guest: Helena Yu, MD Advances in treatment and new insights into the biology of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have led to the development of treatments that significantly extend overall survival. In this discussion, Drs. Mark Socinski and Helena Yu cover the l…
 
Host: William J. Gradishar MD, FASCO, FACP Guest: Peter Schmid, FRCP, MD, PhD This activity will enhance knowledge and competence in the management of HER2-positive breast cancer. Dr. William Gradishar and Dr. Peter Schmid engage in a lively discussion regarding the latest clinical data supporting novel investigational and approved therapies for th…
 
Host: Mark A. Socinski, MD Guest: Gilberto de Lima Lopes Junior, MD, MBA, FAMS Advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains incurable; however, advances in treatment and new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of the disease have led to the development of treatments that significantly extend overall survival. This discussion between Drs…
 
Host: Mark A. Socinski, MD Guest: Edward B. Garon, MD, MS Advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains incurable, but overall survival is improving, as shown by new scientific and clinical data that are emerging on the use of checkpoint inhibitors in the frontline setting and after disease progression. This discussion between Drs. Mark Socin…
 
Host: Mark A. Socinski, MD Guest: Suresh S. Ramalingam, MD While advanced non-small cell lung cancer remains incurable, innovations in treatment and new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of the disease have led to the development of treatments that significantly extend overall survival. This activity will discuss the new scientific and clini…
 
Host: Warner K. Huh, MD Guest: Deborah K. Armstrong, MD Guest: Robert L. Coleman, MD, FACOG, FACS The approval of PARP inhibitors for maintaining response to chemotherapy and in recurrent disease has improved outcomes for patients. Additionally, ongoing and conclusive studies are paving the way for PARP inhibitor use earlier in therapy. This activi…
 
Host: Stephen M. Cohen, MD, FACOG Guest: Thomas C. Wright, Jr., MD Cervical cancer screening (CCS) methods include cytology alone, use of primary high-risk HPV testing alone, and co-testing. Regardless of the screening approach used, effective triage tests are needed to decide who among the presumptive positive women should receive further diagnost…
 
Host: Peter H. O'Donnell, MD Guest: Daniel P. Petrylak, MD The treatment of urothelial carcinoma, the most common type of bladder cancer, has historically been limited to platinum-based chemotherapy; however, the majority of patients will relapse. And while immunotherapy has offered survival benefits to patients, not all patients respond to immune …
 
In this episode of the OMNIA Podcast, we recap the 60-Second lectures from the spring of 2019 and highlight two favorites from our archive. You’ll learn about race in the USA from a philosophical perspective, the psychology of why we quit, why truth matters to democracy, and new pedagogies for teaching in the age of climate change. Our dip into the…
 
In this episode, we talk to Charles Bernstein, inventive poet, writer of libretti, translator, archivist, and, since 2003, a member of Penn's faculty. Bernstein is the Donald T. Regan Professor of English and Comparative Literature and co-director of PennSound. He retired from the Department of English at the end of the spring 2019 semester. In 201…
 
In our new series, OMNIA 101, we talk to faculty members about integral aspects of their research, shedding light on their biggest challenges and their strategies for conquering them. Mark Trodden, Chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Fay R. and Eugene L. Langberg Professor of Physics, and Masao Sako, Associate Professor and Und…
 
Since 2003, the 60-Second Lecture Series has challenged Arts and Sciences faculty to distill a wealth of knowledge into a one-minute talk. Every Wednesday in September and April sees Penn Arts and Sciences faculty members standing at a podium on College Green and lecturing on topics ranging from human history, to fractions, to fly fishing—all in un…
 
In this episode, we explore a potential watershed moment in American politics: the unprecedented number of women running for office in 2018. Dawn Teele, Janice and Julian Bers Assistant Professor of Political Science, researches women and politics, voting rights reform, and candidate recruitment. Right now, she’s studying Emerge, the largest Democr…
 
Host: John J. Russell, MD Guest: Richard Wender, MD From oncologists to primary care, physicians are witnessing an alarming trend in younger patients: the rising risk of colorectal cancer. To investigate this growing threat, Dr. John Russell speaks with Dr. Rich Wender, Chief Cancer Control Officer at the American Cancer Society. Dr. Wender discuss…
 
In December 2017, The New York Times revealed the existence of a Pentagon program investigating unidentified flying objects. For many people, the continued existence of such a program on UFOs came as a surprise, though the military has historically been known to conduct such studies. Most notably, the Air Force’s Project Blue Book investigated more…
 
Host: Brian P. McDonough, MD, FAAFP Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection remains one of the most common sexually transmitted infections in both females and males, with about 9 in 10 people contracting HPV at some point in their lives. Host Dr. Brian McDonough is joined by Samantha Gottlieb, medical anthropologist and author of Not Quite a Cancer Va…
 
Host: Shira Johnson, MD Guest: Ronald DeMatteo, MD, FACS A Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) is a rare sarcoma that begins in the digestive tract or stomach, with an incident rate in the United States of approximately 4,000 to 6,000 cases per year. Since these tumors behave differently from other gastrointestinal cancers, they require a special…
 
Taije Silverman is an award-winning poet and faculty member in the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of English where she teaches classes on poetry, creative nonfiction, and translation. Before coming to Penn, she taught at the University of Bologna in Italy, where she was a Fulbright Scholar, and at Emory University, where she was the Creati…
 
Host: Shira Johnson, MD Guest: Robert Vonderheide, MD For years, the foundations of cancer treatment, surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy were utilized with the objective of weakening cancer. But over the past several years, immunotherapy – therapies that enlist and strengthen the power of a patient’s immune system to attack tumors - has e…
 
Concerns over lead poisoning were heightened in the U.S. after the contamination of a city water supply in Flint, Michigan. In Philadelphia and southeastern Pennsylvania, rates of lead exposure in children are high—especially in low-income communities. Thanks to a Making a Difference in Diverse Communities grant from Penn Arts and Sciences, a team …
 
Host: John J. Russell, MD Guest: Harish Lavu, MD Pancreatic cancer is projected to become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States by 2020. This is due, in large part, to its insidious onset and subtle presentation even at late stages, many symptoms of which are often attributed to common and less serious conditions in …
 
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