show episodes
 
A podcast for all ancient history fans! The Ancients is dedicated to discussing our distant past. Featuring interviews with historians and archaeologists, each episode covers a specific theme from antiquity. From Neolithic Britain to the Fall of Rome. Hosted by Tristan Hughes.
 
This my retelling of the story of England, which is a regular, chronological podcast, starting from from the end of Roman Britain. I’m a bloke in a shed, but I make sure this is good, properly prepared history, and then fill it with my enthusiasm. You’ll find the great events and people for sure – but also some of the byways, of how people lived, their language, and the forces that shaped their lives and destinies.(Note iTunes only displays a list of 300 episodes. There are rather more, whic ...
 
This show will detail the biographies and interesting facts of the Papacy of Rome. It will start in the beginning, but will not go straight through. There will be many side tracks and detours along the way. We will investigate the backstreets of the Papacy where the tour normally doesn't go. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/historyofthepapacy.
 
The most entertaining and enraging stories from mythology told casually, contemporarily, and (let's be honest) sarcastically. Greek and Roman gods did some pretty weird (and awful) things. Liv focuses on Greek and Roman mythology's (mis)treatment of women, the wild things the gods did, and the all around incredible minds of the ancient world. I mean, how did they come up with this stuff? Gods, goddesses, heroes, monsters, and everything in between. Regular episodes every Tuesday, conversatio ...
 
The 'on this day in history' podcast, with a new episode every single day. Featuring historical events that range from the Roman Empire to the World Wide Web, HistoryPod proves that there is always something to be remembered 'on this day'. Written and presented by Scott Allsop, creator of the award-winning www.mrallsophistory.com
 
A fast-moving history of the western world from the ancient world to the present day. Examine how the emergence of the western world as a global dominant power was not something that should ever have been taken for granted. This podcast traces the development of western civilization starting in the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome, past the collapse of the Western Roman Empire into the Dark Ages, and then follows European and, ultimately, American history as the western world moved ...
 
The rise of Western Civilization through its political and military conflicts. Sarcasm throughout but still as grounded to reality as possible, there's no reason this can't be fun. Multiple episodes on a specific time period or leader with a different metal intro for every episode
 
It's Roman. It's history. And it's potentially quite interesting. A sidelong look into the history of the Roman Empire and the Roman world in general, covering death, life, taxes, politics, naughty things, stabby things, unbelievable displays of avarice, poverty, humour, tragedy, religion, food, drink and prostitution. All the important life skills covered in a world two thousand years from our own but eerily familiar. And the vast majority of it is absolutely true.
 
Do you like your history haunted? Then Macabre London is the podcast for you. Every fortnight we'll unravel a tale that's gruesome, horrifying or downright macabre. Support this show at http://supporter.acast.com/macabrelondon Get bonus content on Patreon Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/macabrelondon. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
Barbarians, political breakdown, economic collapse, mass migration, pillaging and plunder. The fall of the Roman Empire has been studied for years, but genetics, climate science, forensic science, network models, and globalization studies have reshaped our understanding of one of the most important events in human history. PhD historian and specialist Patrick Wyman brings the cutting edge of history to listeners in plain, relatable English.
 
Travel back in time with me to some of the most fascinating moments in human history. Witness colossal sea battles involving tens of thousands of men, take part in pagan blood rituals in the mysterious forests of Northern Europe and engage in highly orchestrated tribal warfare within Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. All this and more from the comfort of your own living room/bus to work/toilet throne
 
M
Myths and Legends

1
Myths and Legends

Jason Weiser, Carissa Weiser

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Weekly
 
Jason Weiser tells stories from myths, legends, and folklore that have shaped cultures throughout history. Some, like the stories of Aladdin, King Arthur, and Hercules are stories you think you know, but with surprising origins. Others are stories you might not have heard, but really should. All the stories are sourced from world folklore, but retold for modern ears. These are stories of wizards, knights, Vikings, dragons, princesses, and kings from the time when the world beyond the map was ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
Episode 117b Celtic Kings, Druids and Romans Description: Dr. Carly McNamara joins us again to discuss how the society of the ancient Celts was organized. We will also begin to discuss aspects of pre-Christian religion in Ireland. Dr. McNamara will show the importance of kingship in Ireland. She will also begin to show how Christianity and society …
 
Flame haired warrior queen, or angry debtor? Myth or reality? Fact or a load of old nonsense? We take a look at Roman history's favourite angry Barbarian widow, Boudica. Link for partners - https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1903188 Find us - https://potentiallyinterestingromanhistory.buzzsprout.com/ Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/do…
 
The Ninth Legion of the Roman army was last recorded in York in around AD 107. After that it simply vanished from history. To this day no-one knows what caused the destruction of this elite army unit, although many theories have been put forward. As we continue our series on history’s most puzzling events, Miles Russell explores the various possibi…
 
How can we reconstruct the experiences of enslaved people? Historian Shaun Wallace speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his work on the Fugitive Slave Database, which uses newspaper adverts for fugitive enslaved people from the American South to reconstruct the stories of those who escaped from slavery. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out info…
 
Spoilers for all of AC Odyssey, particularly the Atlantis DLC, obviously. Assassin's Creed Odyssey is known for its accuracy... so where did it get Atlantis? Liv speaks with returning guest Dr. Kira Jones all about the world of Assassin's Creed Atlantis. Follow Kira on Twitter. Further Reading: Plato’s Timaeus and Critias, quotes translated by Benj…
 
In the third century, Rome faced a reinvigorated Persia, led by the Sasanian dynasty. In 260 AD, the Roman Emperor Valerian was defeated and captured. Allegedly, the Persian King used him as a footstool to mount his horse before flaying him and displaying his skin in his palace. How did the Sasanians triumph over the Romans? Find out in this episod…
 
Ever wonder what Stonehenge is made from? The clue is in the title...but someone else has decided to make it from Spam. Today we're combining both July and August in this episode as Spamhenge was apparently the only weird thing that happened in July. To make up for it though, we have two tales in August which are both very odd. First up we have the…
 
Beginning in the early Fourteenth Century, the Papacy went through a period of protracted exile from Rome. The Popes changed the seat of the Papal Government to Avignon, on the Rhone River in modern-day France. This period of exile coincided with the further decline and secularization of the Roman Catholic Church in ways that would hurt the overall…
 
Author Robert Harris speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about Munich: The Edge of War, the new Netflix film adapted from his 2017 historical novel Munich. They discuss the real history behind the 1938 Munich conference, the challenges of reassessing Neville Chamberlain, and what it’s like seeing your book adapted for the screen. See acast.com/privacy for pr…
 
Liv speaks with archaeologist David S. Anderson about the concept, and harm, of pseudoarchaeology. Why it matters to promote false notions of alien intervention and the study of the very real ancient people of the world is much more important. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or mo…
 
Murray tackles this question on the Silver Shields. Do we have any evidence that the Silver Sheilds' actual combat effectiveness began to diminish as they grew old? How much of it was true strength and how much of it was fearsome reputation? How unique were these 'old' veterans in ancient warfare? Patreon: patreon.com/anceintwarfarepodcast…
 
A conversation with Jack Tannous (Princeton University) about the "simple believers" who made up the majority of the population of Byzantium (as well as the caliphate and just about any premodern monotheistic society). They probably knew little about the minutiae of theology, but what did they know about their faith, and how important was theology …
 
In this episode, it's Roman Emperors behaving badly--and Praetorian Prefects behaving even worse. Beginning with Caligula, Emperors were assaulted in their homes, killed with their families, dragged through the streets, and mutilated by angry mobs. At one point, the Praetorians even assassinated an Emperor, then auctioned off the Empire to the high…
 
In January 330 BC, Alexander the Great faced one of his most difficult challenges to date. A small Persian force, entrenched in a formidable defensive position that blockaded Alexander’s route to the Persian heartlands. A narrow pass through the Zagros Mountains that has gone down in history as the Persian, or Susian, Gates. Although nowhere near t…
 
Roger Luckhurst speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about how the idea of the Gothic has evolved and mutated over time, from medieval-inspired architecture and 19th-century vampire fiction to politicised horror films. He also reveals how the genre has been used as a vehicle to explore society’s anxieties over time, from sex and gender to race and colonialism…
 
This is a teaser for upcoming episodes of the History of the Papacy Podcast! You can learn more about the History of Papacy and subscribe at all these great places: http://atozhistorypage.com/ https://www.historyofthepapacypodcast.com email: steve@atozhistorypage.com https://www.patreon.com/historyofthepapacy parthenonpodcast.com Beyond the Big Scr…
 
A story from Spanish folklore of three brothers, a crafting competition, a smelly Trojan parrot, and a lesson that it's never too late to start on the Hero's Journey. I mean, you might end up in jail, but it's still inspiring? The creature this week is the Gohonga, a creature that will take your child, educate them, and return them as a forty-year-…
 
Historian Natalie Livingstone chronicles the unexplored lives of the women who shaped the famous Rothschild banking dynasty. She speaks to Elinor Evans about how – though often excluded in a patriarchal society – they forged their own paths, from influential hostesses to pioneering scientists. (Ad) Natalie Livingstone is the author of The Women of …
 
We've heard the original source for Atlantis, but why is it that Plato's Timaeus and Critias can't be termed "myths"? If it isn't a myth, how do we know that there isn't some history behind it? This episode details what we do know about Plato's Atlantis and what that proves. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and t…
 
Richard J Aldrich and Rory Cormac discuss Queen Victoria’s love of espionage and her network of royal intelligence agents Historians Richard J Aldrich and Rory Cormac speak to Emma Slattery Williams about their book The Secret Royals, which explores the connections between espionage and the British monarchy, revealing how Queen Victoria utilised a …
 
Today I speak with Dr. Jackson Crawford about two sagas of mythical heroes. Support this podcast by visiting our sponsor Norse Tradesman. P.S. - You can save 20% off your order by using the coupon code ''VIKING'' at checkout. Referenced in Today’s Episode: Two Sagas of Mythical Heroes: Hervor and Heidrek and Hrólf Kraki and His Champions Dr. Crawfo…
 
In the latest episode in our series on history’s biggest topics, Professor Rana Mitter answers your questions about one of the defining events of modern Chinese history. Speaking to Rob Attar, he explores the role of Chairman Mao in the Cultural Revolution, its impact on China’s population and its legacy today. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and…
 
At the end of the Seven Years War, the Proclamation of 1763 was issued by the British, which granted any lands west of the Appalachian Mountains in the Ohio Valley of North America to the Native Americans. American colonists could not settle any of these lands and would be forcibly removed by British forces if necessary. Dur: 18mins File: mp3…
 
16 January 27 BC is a date sometimes associated with the beginning of the Roman Empire. It was on that day that Octavian received the name Augustus, effectively becoming the first emperor of Rome. Augustus ordered the gates of Janus to be closed, marking an end to the period of Civil War that had characterised Rome for decades before. Entering into…
 
Synopsis: In the mid-11th century BC, the Hittite kingdoms of northern Syria are joined by others– in the Philistine pentapolis, the Amuq plain and the region of Classical Cilicia – with ties to the former Mycenaean Greeks. The Phoenician cities of the Levantine coast begin to step from the shadow of post-Collapse Egypt. “I am really Azatiwada, Man…
 
Dominic Sandbrook explains how the Beatles reflected 1960s Britain, from the globalisation of pop culture to a fascination with mysticism The 1960s was a time of transformation, as the grey of postwar Britain gave way to a technicolour youth culture, with screaming teenage fans, an outpouring of merchandise and a deep obsession with pop music. Domi…
 
Welcome back to another episode of Weird news 2021. Today we're looking at two stories which made the weird news in June 2021. First off we have A weird story involving Prince Charles and Camilla Duchess of Cornwall. Simon Durante-Day a British born man now living in Australia, believes he is the son of the royal pair and was adopted out when he wa…
 
Matthew Gabriele and David M Perry speak to David Musgrove about their book The Bright Ages, which tackles the big themes of the Middle Ages and challenges some widely held views about the history of medieval Europe. (Ad) Matthew Gabriele and David M Perry are the authors of The Bright Ages: A New History of Medieval Europe (HarperCollins, 2021). B…
 
Episode 117a: Introduction to the Ancient Celts Description: I am very excited to be joined by Dr. Carly McNamara of the University of Glasgow to begin our series on the history of Christianity in the British Isles among the Celtic people. In this series we are going to delve way into the ancient past and move into the medieval period. Dr. McNamara…
 
Liv speaks with researcher Flint Dibble all about the archaeology of the Mediterranean, what we know about Plato's Atlantis, and more importantly: what we know about Athens from the Bronze Age and earlier! Twitter threads mentioned in the episode: Atlantis in current pop culture, the dangers of Atlantis "lore", erotic vases. CW/TW: far too many Gre…
 
'To the Greeks and Romans, the Trojan War was the beginning of all warfare and set the standards for the expected behaviour of all men. How does the epic fit actual history?' The Ancient Warfare podcast team discuss the latest issue of the magazine X.3 Warfare in the Age of Homer. Patreon: patreon.com/ancientwarfarepodcast…
 
We follow the life and times of Giovanni di Bicci De Medici, shrewd banker and able politician as he navigates the complicated waters of early 15th century Florentine politics as the republic prepares to kick of an age of unprecedented cultural renewal: the RenaissanceBy A History of Italy
 
Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Thomas Hardy (1840 -1928) and his commitment to poetry, which he prized far above his novels. In the 1890s, once he had earned enough from his fiction, Hardy stopped writing novels altogether and returned to the poetry he had largely put aside since his twenties. He hoped that he might be ranked one day alongside She…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2022 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login