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Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Tune in every weekday for quick reports and commentaries on the world of science—it'll just take a minute
 
Join host Steve Mirsky each week as he explores the latest developments in science and technology through interviews with leading scientists and journalists
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Join host Steve Mirsky each week as he explores the latest developments in science and technology through interviews with leading scientists and journalists
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
Science news and technology updates from Scientific American
 
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show series
 
The marine mammals have extraordinarily sensitive touch—which helps them nab prey in the absence of other sensory cues. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
The marine mammals have extraordinarily sensitive touch—which helps them nab prey in the absence of other sensory cues. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
The marine mammals have extraordinarily sensitive touch—which helps them nab prey in the absence of other sensory cues. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
The marine mammals have extraordinarily sensitive touch—which helps them nab prey in the absence of other sensory cues. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
The marine mammals have extraordinarily sensitive touch—which helps them nab prey in the absence of other sensory cues. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
The marine mammals have extraordinarily sensitive touch—which helps them nab prey in the absence of other sensory cues. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
The marine mammals have extraordinarily sensitive touch—which helps them nab prey in the absence of other sensory cues. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
The marine mammals have extraordinarily sensitive touch—which helps them nab prey in the absence of other sensory cues. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
A few very brief reports about science and technology from around the globe. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Maya Miller.
 
A few very brief reports about science and technology from around the globe. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Maya Miller.
 
A few very brief reports about science and technology from around the globe. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Maya Miller.
 
A few very brief reports about science and technology from around the globe. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Maya Miller.
 
A few very brief reports about science and technology from around the globe. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Maya Miller.
 
A few very brief reports about science and technology from around the globe. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Maya Miller.
 
A few very brief reports about science and technology from around the globe. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Maya Miller.
 
A few very brief reports about science and technology from around the globe. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Maya Miller.
 
A mutation in a key gene may have endowed humans with superior endurance—allowing them to compete better with other animals on the savanna. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
A mutation in a key gene may have endowed humans with superior endurance—allowing them to compete better with other animals on the savanna. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
A mutation in a key gene may have endowed humans with superior endurance—allowing them to compete better with other animals on the savanna. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
A mutation in a key gene may have endowed humans with superior endurance—allowing them to compete better with other animals on the savanna. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
Springtime's arriving earlier across North America. But the degree of change isn't the same everywhere, which could spell trouble for migratory birds. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
Springtime's arriving earlier across North America. But the degree of change isn't the same everywhere, which could spell trouble for migratory birds. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
Springtime's arriving earlier across North America. But the degree of change isn't the same everywhere, which could spell trouble for migratory birds. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
Springtime's arriving earlier across North America. But the degree of change isn't the same everywhere, which could spell trouble for migratory birds. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
Biologists are enlisting citizen scientists to poke around under the sink and behind the curtains, for wildlife living in the "great indoors." Karen Hopkin reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Karen Hopkin.
 
Biologists are enlisting citizen scientists to poke around under the sink and behind the curtains, for wildlife living in the "great indoors." Karen Hopkin reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Karen Hopkin.
 
Biologists are enlisting citizen scientists to poke around under the sink and behind the curtains, for wildlife living in the "great indoors." Karen Hopkin reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Karen Hopkin.
 
Astrophysicists have gotten a better glimpse at what happens to crashing neutron stars by listening in on the electromagnetic echoes of the collision. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
Astrophysicists have gotten a better glimpse at what happens to crashing neutron stars by listening in on the electromagnetic echoes of the collision. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
The hammerhead relatives consume copious amounts of sea grass, and have the digestive machinery to process it—making them true omnivores. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
The hammerhead relatives consume copious amounts of sea grass, and have the digestive machinery to process it—making them true omnivores. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
The hammerhead relatives consume copious amounts of sea grass, and have the digestive machinery to process it—making them true omnivores. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
When Hurricane Irma blew through the Turks and Caicos, lizards with shorter hindlimbs lucked out. Jason G. Goldman reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Jason G. Goldman.
 
When Hurricane Irma blew through the Turks and Caicos, lizards with shorter hindlimbs lucked out. Jason G. Goldman reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Jason G. Goldman.
 
When Hurricane Irma blew through the Turks and Caicos, lizards with shorter hindlimbs lucked out. Jason G. Goldman reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Jason G. Goldman.
 
Senior Editor Gary Stix talks about the September special issue of Scientific American, devoted to the science of being human. And Brown University evolutionary biologist Ken Miller discusses human... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Gary Stix.
 
Senior Editor Gary Stix talks about the September special issue of Scientific American, devoted to the science of being human. And Brown University evolutionary biologist Ken Miller discusses human... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Gary Stix.
 
Senior Editor Gary Stix talks about the September special issue of Scientific American, devoted to the science of being human. And Brown University evolutionary biologist Ken Miller discusses human... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Gary Stix.
 
Senior Editor Gary Stix talks about the September special issue of Scientific American, devoted to the science of being human. And Brown University evolutionary biologist Ken Miller discusses human... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Gary Stix.
 
An intrepid undergrad led the way to understanding the physics of snapping strands of spaghetti. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Karen Hopkin.
 
An intrepid undergrad led the way to understanding the physics of snapping strands of spaghetti. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Karen Hopkin.
 
A few very brief reports about science and technology from around the globe. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Maya Miller.
 
A few very brief reports about science and technology from around the globe. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Maya Miller.
 
Costa Rican scientists are extracting valuable materials from the peel and stubble of pineapples. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Debbie Ponchner.
 
Mosquitoes want your blood for its proteins...or simply to hydrate on a hot, dry day. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Rachel Nuwer.
 
Mosquitoes want your blood for its proteins...or simply to hydrate on a hot, dry day. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Rachel Nuwer.
 
Digital assistants have to respond quickly, but correctly—so researchers are studying how real humans navigate that trade-off, to design better machines. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Christopher Intagliata.
 
The birds are arriving in the Arctic up to 13 days earlier than they used to. But at a cost: hunger. Annie Sneed reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Annie Sneed.
 
The birds are arriving in the Arctic up to 13 days earlier than they used to. But at a cost: hunger. Annie Sneed reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Annie Sneed.
 
Fire ants tunnels got excavated efficiently by only a small percentage of the group doing most of the work, thus avoiding pileups in tight spaces. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.comBy Daniel Ackerman.
 
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