show episodes
 
Every week, we cover the world of economics like no other podcast. From an inside look at the massive market for collector sneakers to the corporate costs for businesses that dabble in Trump era politics, Making Sen$e will make you think about economics in a whole new way. Episodes are published every Thursday by 9 pm. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full shows, individual segments, Brooks and Capehart, Brief but Spectacular, Politics Monday and mor ...
 
Why do some people make it, while others don’t? How do the facts of our lives differ from our perception of it? And how does our psychology shape how we view ourselves and others? Attribution is, where people from all walks of life, reflect on who and what has contributed to where they ended up. Our hope is after each episode, you feel a little more inspired, grateful, or supported, than when you first hit play.
 
In seven compelling episodes, this podcast covers the most pressing and misunderstood aspects of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program, including how security vetting actually works, the economic impact of refugees, the history of U.S. immigration and ongoing pattern of fear and vilification of newcomers, faith perspectives, veteran perspectives, and the current status and future of the global migration crisis that has rivaled the historical migrant flows of WWII and continues to rise today. M ...
 
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show series
 
Maria Konnikova is a New York Times best-selling author, journalist, and professional poker player. Her latest book,The Biggest Bluff, is now out in paperback. It was a fun and fascinating conversation exploring the balance of skill and chance in life. Among the many stories shared was how a chance encounter with a single line in a story she wrote …
 
Since taking office in January, President Joe Biden has made a number of moves to change former President Trump's hardline immigration policies. But just last week, Vice President Kamala Harris delivered a tough message in Guatemala, telling its citizens not to come to the U.S. For the series "Making Sense," Paul Solman explores the economic debate…
 
Unemployment claims dropped again Thursday, and this week may also bring a clearer picture of what's happening with the job market. As more Americans get vaccinated, workers and companies are figuring out what post-pandemic work life will look like -- and how it may change permanently. NewsHour's Paul Solman has the story as part of his series, "Ma…
 
President Joe Biden has said that changing immigration law remains an important piece of his agenda. But the path to new legislation is complex and hardly clear. One of the biggest flashpoints in this debate are questions about undocumented workers and their role in the economy. Paul Solman dives into those questions for his latest report for "Maki…
 
Natasha Trethewey is a two-time U.S. Poet Laureate and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for her book of poems, Native Guard. Her latest book is Memorial Drive; A Daughter’s Memoir. It was a moving and deeply personal conversation. We talked about the debt we both owe to our mothers and how we examine and reconcile our complicated personal and national …
 
For almost two months, Amazon workers have been voting on whether to unionize at one of the company's major warehouses in Alabama. The voting concludes today. Since Amazon is the second-largest private employer in the country, the stakes are high and the battle is being closely watched. Paul Solman reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://ww…
 
Richard Reeves is a senior fellow at the Brooking Institution whose research focuses on the middle class, inequality and social mobility. His latest book is Dream Hoarders: How the American Upper Middle Class Is Leaving Everyone Else in the Dust, Why That Is a Problem, and What to Do about It. Our conversation really challenges us all to reconsider…
 
The World Health Organization is expected to release a report on its investigation into the origins of the novel coronavirus in the coming days. Among the many theories is the unproven belief that it was passed on from bats -- leading to much public fear of the mammals. But the growing threat to bats could mean bad news for us too. Special correspo…
 
As Washington debates how to provide economic aid during the pandemic, many say one critical component should be part of future deals: forgiving student debt. But determining how much could or should be forgiven is a complicated question. Paul Solman looks at the pressure to make changes for our series, "Making Sense." PBS NewsHour is supported by …
 
Aaron Sanchez is an award-winning chef, TV personality, author and philanthropist. He is chef/owner of Johnny Sánchez in New Orleans, and a judge on FOX’s hit culinary competition series MasterChef and MasterChef Junior. For the many “famous” roles he plays, it was our discussion about the more essential ones of being fathers, sons, grandsons and f…
 
Jobless claims were high again this past week with more than 860,000 people filing for unemployment benefits for the first time. Millions of people are still looking for work, but some employers say they can't find enough skilled workers for certain jobs. That is due in part, they say, because of stigmas that need to change. Paul Solman reports for…
 
Nick Kristof is a self-described “Oregon farm boy turned New York Times columnist.” We discussed his latest book, Tightrope: Americans Reaching for Hope. Written with his wife, Sheryl WuDunn, it explores why some people, including many childhood friends from his #6 school bus, have dramatically different life outcomes than others.It was a deeply ho…
 
In late January, a handful of unlikely Wall Street stocks began skyrocketing in value, which has led to big market volatility. The spike was driven by an unconventional group of traders who had banded together on a buying spree, determined to take on the market. Paul Solman reports as part of our economic series, "Making Sense." PBS NewsHour is sup…
 
There's a shortage of skilled tradespeople throughout the American economy, and it is a persistent problem that started well before the pandemic. But what's behind that gap and what can be done? Paul Solman reports for our series, "Work Shift", which focuses on navigating the job market in a post-COVID economy. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https:…
 
Paul Solman is the business, economics and occasional art correspondent for the PBS NewsHour. Paul is also co-founder of the American Exchange Project. Our conversation was recorded as part of an event held by the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership at City College, where I also teach. It was a fascinating discussion about the histo…
 
One of the consequences of the chaos of the U.S. Capitol is a distancing of banks and other business from former President Trump. He now faces a delicate and difficult situation with his businesses, debt and taxes. Paul Solman reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders…
 
Since last week's riot at the Capitol, more and more companies are cutting ties with Donald Trump, and dozens of corporations suspended political contributions to the 147 members of Congress who refused to certify the election of Joe Biden. Paul Solman reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders…
 
Americans are living longer, with average life expectancy in the U.S. rising from age 71 in 1970 to age 79 last year, leading many to stay employed far past retirement age. Paul Solman reports on some of the oldest workers of all, and the lessons they can share, as part of our series, "Unfinished Business." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://ww…
 
Millions of Americans have been crushed by the pandemic but older workers have faced both an economy with high levels of unemployment and a virus that puts them more at risk than younger people. And once they do lose a job it can be harder to find new ones, with many older workers simply giving up the search. Paul Solman reports as part of our seri…
 
Musician/producer/songwriter, Jonnie “Most” Davis had his first number one hit at the age of 24. Since then he’s worked with artists such as Roger Daltry, Mary J. Blige, Biggie Smalls, Outkast, Usher, American Authors, and Pink. All toll he has 25 Gold and Platinum records to his credit. But in this conversation, you’ll hear that he doesn’t define …
 
In this wide ranging conversation, the author and entrepreneur Bobby Jones talks about business, culture, sports - and the role each plays in making the world a bit better. In sharing his own journey growing up in Washington DC, Bobby talks about the importance of just “showing up for each other”, seeing examples of successful people who look like …
 
Rachel Botsman is a leading expert and author on trust in the modern world. As the first Trust Fellow at Oxford University’s Saïd Business School, she aims to challenge and change the way people think about trust and related topics such as power, influence, truth and beliefs. In her conversation with Bob, they talk about the underappreciated but fu…
 
Rachel Ruttan’s research is ripe with counterintuitive findings, such as, how past experience overcoming a struggle can actually make us less compassionate to people currently experiencing the same challenge. Or how the pursuit of money can make us feel worse about ourselves. Going behind her fascinating research, listen to how Rachel’s own journey…
 
To give you a taste of Shai Davidai’s work, here is a sampling of how the media has featured his research: “How much of a role does luck play in our success or failure?” The Guardian; “To tackle inequality, remember the advantages you’ve had”; The New York Times; and “Why is my life so hard?” from Freakonomics radio. In this conversation, we’ll cov…
 
Why do some people make it, while others don’t? How do the facts of our lives differ from our perception of it? And how does our psychology shape how we view ourselves and others? Attribution is, where people from all walks of life, reflect on who and what has contributed to where they ended up. Our hope is after each episode, you feel a little mor…
 
The worsening pandemic continues to mean millions of Americans out of work. For older employees in particular, this kind of long-term unemployment can represent the end of a career -- especially when they may be facing age discrimination and bias. Economics correspondent Paul Solman looks at the problem as part of his series Unfinished Business. PB…
 
The U.S. feels more deeply divided than it has in decades. According to social scientist Robert Putnam, the data backs up that assessment. Putnam, author of the seminal work on social capital and isolation "Bowling Alone," believes looking back to American history can help pave a new path to unity and equality. Paul Solman reports on Putnam's new b…
 
With large parts of the economy still sputtering under the weight of the coronavirus pandemic, many people are having to scale back. But some older Americans were already living a minimalist lifestyle on the road -- and some of them have leveraged their nomadic approach into income. Economics correspondent Paul Solman has their story as part of our…
 
The pandemic has spurred surges in camping and RV travel due to the need for social distancing and outdoor activity. But it's not all fun and vacations: one group of Americans adopted a self-sufficient and nomadic lifestyle long ago, living full-time in motor homes and working seasonal jobs to support themselves as they travel the United States. Pa…
 
COVID-19 vaccine development continues to be the subject of political jostling, with President Trump contradicting top U.S. health officials regarding timeline and efficacy. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say they expect to distribute vaccines publicly at no cost to the patient. But what will the government pay, and how much could d…
 
U.S. airlines are sending out warnings about huge financial losses and urgently requesting help. Tens of thousands of flights for the fall have been canceled, and change fees have been eliminated in order to attract travelers. Meanwhile, flight staff and security are being drawn into arguments with passengers who refuse to comply with mask mandates…
 
Throughout the Republican National Convention, supporters of President Trump have touted his economic record as a key reason they believe he should be reelected. But what would a second-term policy agenda look like for Trump, as the coronavirus pandemic continues to limit economic growth and threaten American jobs? Paul Solman reports on Trump's re…
 
With tens of millions of Americans reeling financially from the coronavirus pandemic, the future of the U.S. economy is on the minds of many. Both President Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden are seeking to convince voters they can revive the country. But what do their respective policies suggest? Paul Solman analyzes some of Biden's key eco…
 
The antibiotics industry has suffered an alarming collapse that has become even more troubling as secondary bacterial infections threaten patients with COVID-19. Why has production of these vital medicines stagnated, and what can be done to address the problem? Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on why lifesaving drugs don't necessarily tr…
 
COVID-19 can be accompanied by secondary bacterial infections with deadly consequences. But the industry that researches and produces antibiotics to fight such illnesses has been upended -- and the pandemic is only making things worse. Now, medical experts worry about the long-term health implications of not having cutting-edge antibiotics in the p…
 
In the U.S., child care was expensive and difficult to obtain long before the pandemic. But coronavirus has closed schools, forced parents to work from home and shuttered some care facilities for good. With COVID-19 surging in much of the country, many parents may not be able to return to the workforce full-time. Paul Solman reports on the dilemma …
 
What does faith demand of us? What can we gain from meeting those demands? What has gone so wrong and how can faith help us find a solution in the conflicting narrative about refugees, Muslims, and immigrants in general? Meet Faith Forward Dallas, an interfaith coalition in Dallas, Texas providing a model to the world of how we can practice our fai…
 
This month, we will find the common ground between an Iranian refugee youth activist, a soprano former student and Conrad Charging Choir member, and a U.S. Marine who now advocates for refugees. How, you may ask? Listen now to find out!On this episode, you'll meet Rooha Haghar, a junior at Conrad High School in Dallas who is also an Iranian Bahá'í …
 
This is the story of Bothina Matar, a Syrian refugee who witnessed the horrific government's response to children and teenagers writing a message to Syria's President Bashar al-Assad on the wall of a school in Daraa. That response sparked the crisis Syria is still experiencing today.We will also learn about the Global Migration Crisis, the largest …
 
On this episode, meet Nisar Ahmad Momand. Nisar spent most of his life as a refugee, first in Pakistan, then as an enemy of the Taliban who worked for the U.S. Army in Afghanistan, risking his life and becoming the target of Taliban attacks three times! He now lives in Houston, TX with his family and works with a resettlement agency helping newly a…
 
In this powerful episode, follow Dr. Hadidja Nyiransekuye on a journey into the heart of the 1994 Rwandan genocide that will make you question the very thing that makes us human. Paul Solman of PBS NewsHour describes how refugees revitalized the town of Utica, NY, and Dr. Jennifer Hunt of Rutgers University explains the cost benefit analysis of ref…
 
FULL INTERVIEW WITH NICHOLAS HERAS OF CNAS (Subject matter expert for Episode 2 "Guilty Until Proven Innocent".This is the full WebEx audio interview with Nicholas Heras of Center for a New American Security in Washington D.C. Nicholas discusses the key differences between U.S. and Euro migration and refugee flows and details the security vetting p…
 
Follow the refugee journey of Sarah Al-Kayali as she and her family flee sectarian militia threats and bombings in Baghdad Iraq before coming to the U.S. Then, national security expert Nicholas Heras of Center for a New American Security discusses the security vetting of refugees. The full version of his interview can be heard here: http://smu.edu/…
 
In this, our premiere episode of an 8 part monthly podcast series, we meet Ghazwan Abdullah, his wife Huda, and their 11-year-old daughter Hiba who are Iraqi refugees resettled in Dallas, Texas. Along the way we'll also discover meaningful connections from peacebuilder Jason Clarke and hear expert commentary on asylum seekers from Bill Holston. Joi…
 
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