show episodes
 
Health Care Rounds is a weekly podcast developed for health care leaders who are at the forefront of health care delivery and payment reform. Join Darwin Research Group founder and CEO John Marchica as he discusses the latest advancements in health care business news and policy developments, including interviews with dynamic leaders in health care. John is a veteran health care strategist and is leading ongoing research initiatives on health care delivery systems and value-based care. Health ...
 
EdTech Café is a podcast series produced by the educational technology team at Stanford Medicine. Our team sits at the intersection of art, science, and education, and in this space we’ll sit down with other media- and production-savvy professionals to discuss how they use their talents to support science and education across the globe.
 
BioFlash is a biweekly podcast, hosted by San Francisco Business Times biotech reporter Ron Leuty. From cancer immunotherapy to drug pricing, we explore the hot topics driving the life sciences ecosystem in the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond.
 
Teachers in White Coats is a podcast series produced by the Educational Technology team at Stanford Medicine, where we sit down with doctors, faculty, and other health professionals to hear their stories on the innovative ways they’ve used education to help improve health outcomes across the globe. The show is hosted by Erfan Mojaddam, Manager of Academic Tech and Innovation at Stanford Medicine.
 
Reach Your Height, gives limb reconstruction specialists as well as their patients access to thought leaders as they discuss best practices for patients undergoing limb lengthening and or reconstruction. Host Dr. Mitchell Bernstein, head of Pediatric Orthopedic Trauma at Montreal Childrens Hospital and co-director of the limb deformity unit at Shriner’s Hospital for Children in Montreal interviews highly regarded surgeons around the world. We’ll also hear from some of their patients. We hope ...
 
Dive into the growing role that data science plays in the latest biomedical innovations. I’m your host, Anika Gupta, a PhD student in Bioinformatics at Harvard and the Broad Institute. Join me for ~30 minutes each week as I go behind the scenes and check the pulse with domain experts and rising stars who are leading advances in data-driven human health. For a glossary of terms and resources my guests recommend, check out: bit.ly/datapulse-glossary Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the- ...
 
Struggling with sleep? Desperate for deep dreams? Or simply looking to be better in life? Then make sure you listen and subscribe to Sleep Success, a new health and wellness podcast that will improve your quality of life by providing hacks, tips, tools and techniques to let you rest more at night, so you can dominate the day. Hosted by the man known as The Sleep Doctor, Dr. Michael Breus, this weekly podcast will feature his incredible expertise and insights as well as fascinating conversati ...
 
MedEdTalks Ophthalmology is a continuing medical education podcast for physicians to allow them to learn while on the go and obtain CME credits. This show will focus in on ophthalmology topics, such as nAMD and Diabetic Retinopathy and includes interviews with Dr. Rishi Singh from the Cole Eye Institute, Dr. Andrew Moshfeghi from the USC Roski Eye Institute, Dr. Dilsher Dhoot from California Retina Consultants, Dr. Theodore Leng from Byers Eye Institute at Stanford, Dr. Nathan Steinle from C ...
 
Being healthy in this crazy, busy, modern world is not easy. The Whole Health Life Podcast is for anyone who wants to take control of their health and find real-world, simple, evidence-based solutions to improve their health from every aspect, adding years to their lives and saving thousands of dollars. Each episode, Shannon Harvey, talks to a world leading scientist about the most important aspects of our health. From dealing with work stress, the food we eat, to improving our relationships ...
 
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show series
 
You’ve no doubt heard this famous quote from science fiction writer, William Gibson, “The future is already here – it's just not evenly distributed.” What better way to describe technology and medicine? The runway for technological innovation and adoption is just a little longer in our world. What other profession or industry can you think of that …
 
Have you ever felt, “Oh my God, I’m turning into my mother (or father)!” ? Robert Plomin explains why that happens in Blueprint: How DNA Makes Us Who We Are (MIT Press, 2019). A century of genetic research shows that DNA differences inherited from our parents are the consistent lifelong sources of our psychological individuality―the blueprint that …
 
Sir Noel Malcolm’s captivating new book, Useful Enemies: Islam and the Ottoman Empire in Western Political Thought, 1450-1750 (Oxford University Press, 2019), tells the story of Western European fascination with the Ottoman empire and Islam between the fall of Constantinople in 1453 and the latter half of the 18th century. This beautifully argued, …
 
At the end of the 20th century, the liberal international order appeared unassailable after its triumph over the authoritarian challenges of Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia. Twenty years later, however, the assumptions underlying the system appear discredited as international relations devolve into confrontation and conflict. In The New Twenty Years…
 
In Black Land: Imperial Ethiopianism and African America (Princeton University Press, 2019), Nadia Nurhussein explores late nineteenth and twentieth century African American cultural engagement with and literary depictions of imperial Ethiopia. Widely celebrated as one of two African nations to resist European colonization in the age of modern impe…
 
Rafael Pelayo, MD is the author of How to Sleep and a clinical professor at Stanford University. Since 1993 he has been a part of the Stanford Sleep Disorders Clinic. He teaches the popular Sleep and Dreams undergraduate course and co-authored the textbook with Dr. William Dement. He helped lead the effort to delay school start times in California.…
 
Azan Virji discusses his path to Harvard Medical School, and challenges faced by international medical students [Show summary] Med student Azan Virji explores the unique challenges he faced as an international student applying to Harvard Medical School, as well as his mission to mentor students like himself through the organization he founded, F-1 …
 
What does an individual's digital presence reveal about imminent infectious disease outbreaks, obesity prevalence, and the spread of medical misinformation? How can Google Maps images reveal socioeconomic factors that contribute to disparities in health? When and how does community context matter? Elaine Nsoesie, Professor at Boston University Scho…
 
In my old age, I try to argue more quietly, though I still believe that sharp disagreement is a sign of political seriousness. What engaged citizens think and say matters; we should aim to get it right and to defeat those who get it wrong. I understand the very limited impact of what I write, but I continue to believe that the stakes are high. – Mi…
 
In my old age, I try to argue more quietly, though I still believe that sharp disagreement is a sign of political seriousness. What engaged citizens think and say matters; we should aim to get it right and to defeat those who get it wrong. I understand the very limited impact of what I write, but I continue to believe that the stakes are high. – Mi…
 
What is Badiou’s theory of emancipation? For whom is this emancipation possible? Does emancipation entail an indifference to difference? In Universal Emancipation: Race Beyond Badiou (University of Minnesota Press, 2020) (Minnesota University Press, 2020), Elisabeth Paquette pursues these questions through a sustained conversation with decolonial t…
 
The Protestant Reformation looms large in our cultural imagination. In the standard telling, it’s the moment the world went modern. Casting off the shackles and superstitions of medieval Catholicism, reformers translated the Bible into the vernacular and democratized religion. In this story, it’s no wonder that Protestantism should give birth to li…
 
We live in a society where stress-related issues are the #1 driver of appointments to your primary care physician—somewhere in the range of 75-90% of all primary care visits! I’m a firm believer of focusing on the basics, and stress is one of those basics that, if we can just get it under control, a myriad of other things will fall into place. Dr. …
 
Vinay Prasad is a practicing hematologist-oncologist who doubles as a “meta-researcher,” studying the quality of medical evidence, health policy, and clinical trials. In this episode, Vinay discusses the differences in clinical treatment from the existing medical evidence, often leading to useless, or even harmful, outcomes for patients. With a foc…
 
America is in a Cold Civil War, between people who see each other as threats to the country — but themselves as patriots. How can that be? They are patriots of two nations. In Patriots of Two Nations: Why Trump Was Inevitable and What Happens Next (McDavid Media), national media commentator and presidential campaigns veteran Spencer Critchley shows…
 
The German philosopher Martin Heidegger’s influence over the last several decades of philosophy is undeniable, but his place in the canon has been called into question in recent years in the wake of the publication of his private journals kept throughout his life, including during his involvement with the Nazi Party. This has led to a renewal of an…
 
Stefan Bauer has written an outstanding study of one of the most important Catholic historians in early modern Europe. Bauer, who has just taken up a new position teaching history at Warwick University, UK, has spent much of the last decade working on the life and work of Onofrio Panvinio. The result, The Invention of Papal History: Onofrio Panvini…
 
One of the central threads in the public discourse on Black womanhood is the idea of the “Jezebel.” This trope deems Black women and girls as dishonorable and sexually deviant and the stereotype is circulated from the big screen to the pulpit. Tamura Lomax, Associate Professor at Michigan State University, outlines a historical genealogy of the dis…
 
The German philosopher Martin Heidegger’s influence over the last several decades of philosophy is undeniable, but his place in the canon has been called into question in recent years in the wake of the publication of his private journals kept throughout his life, including during his involvement with the Nazi Party. This has led to a renewal of an…
 
Paul Howe's book Teen Spirit: How Adolescence Transformed the Adult World (Cornell UP, 2020) offers a novel and provocative perspective on how we came to be living in an age of political immaturity and social turmoil. Award-winning author, Paul Howe, argues it's because a teenage mentality has slowly gripped the adult world. Howe contends that many…
 
Dan Pelino is an innovator, thought leader and author. He is a regular contributor to the discussion on healthcare, citizen-based services and Smarter Cities having appeared on CNN, Bloomberg, the BBC and other media outlets. He serves as a moderator and host to the current healthcare debate and is an adjunct professor lecturing on Leadership at We…
 
In Vicissitudes of the Goddess: Reconstructions of the Gramadevata in India's Religious Traditions (Oxford UP, 2013), Padma (Bowdoin College) focuses on two types of Gramadevatas or goddesses: deified women and those associated with disease and fertility. Setting these figures in the context of their Brahmanic transformation into popular goddesses …
 
Black Americans are by far the most unified racial group in American electoral politics, with 80 to 90 percent identifying as Democrats—a surprising figure given that nearly a third now also identify as ideologically conservative, up from less than 10 percent in the 1970s. Why has ideological change failed to push more black Americans into the Repu…
 
Anglophone philosophy in the twentieth century was centered, to an unprecedented extent, around journals: periodical publications that aimed to present (one vision of) the best philosophical work of the moment. By looking at the trends across these journals, we can see important trends in philosophy itself. But looking at the journals is easier sai…
 
Greedy elites are purposefully stoking racial division and laughing all the way to the bank. That is the bottom line of Ian Haney López’s Merge Left: Fusing Race and Class, Winning Elections, and Saving America (The New Press, 2019), an essential read for the upcoming election as the Left tries to rescue democracy from the modern Right’s campaign o…
 
Join Dr. Breus as he interviews Jan Ryde, the fifth consecutive generation family member to operate Hastens the Swedish bed company founded in 1852. Dr. Breus and Jan discuss sleep, the development of beds through the decades, and how Hastens developed not just a mattress but a complete sleep system and what hat means. Of course, they also discuss …
 
Wondering how to write about the tumultuous events of 2020 in your application essays? [Show summary] Accepted Founder Linda Abraham offers a framework for discussing COVID-19, the events of 2020, and their impact on your life in your undergraduate or graduate program applications. Your application should include information about your experience o…
 
Molecular diagnostics are emerging as a precise way to detect diseases early on in prognosis. In today's episode, I chat with Harvard+MIT PhD Student Ava Soleimany on the role of data science in activity-based molecular diagnostics for early cancer detection and how the confluence of classification techniques with feature representation of cancer b…
 
In Gilded Age America, people and animals lived cheek-by-jowl in environments that were dirty and dangerous to man and animal alike. The industrial city brought suffering, but it also inspired a compassion for animals that fueled a controversial anti-cruelty movement. From the center of these debates, Henry Bergh launched a shocking campaign to gra…
 
In his new book, Memoir of a Roadie: Axl said I made a great Cup of Tea…Scott Weiland liked The Carpenters…and Ozzy Drinks Rosé (2020) Joel Miller recounts his time in the early 2000s as a road for Stone Temple Pilots, Guns N’ Roses, Poison, and The Cranberries. Using his journal entries from being on the road, Miller shares what it was like for a …
 
Religious freedom debates set blood boiling. Just consider notable Supreme Court cases of recent years such as Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission or Little Sisters of the Poor v. Pennsylvania. How can we reach any agreement between those who adhere strictly to the demands of divine law and the individual conscience and those f…
 
Program for All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly, or PACE, is not as prevalent as one may think due to certain restrictions the government has recently lifted. Up and coming WelbeHealth, led by Matt Patterson, has quickly grown to be able to provide care to thousands (and growing) of low income older adults. Matt shares how WelbeHealth came together …
 
In this “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) episode, Peter and Bob explore the quality of evidence for hot and cold therapy. In the discussion, they evaluate the safety, efficacy, and opportunity costs of various hot and cold therapy protocols, and Peter ultimately considers the addition of dry sauna to his longevity toolkit. Once again, Bob Kaplan, Peter’s he…
 
In the mid-1870s, the experimental therapy of lamb blood transfusion spread like an epidemic across Europe and the USA. Doctors tried it as a cure for tuberculosis, pellagra and anemia; proposed it as a means to reanimate seemingly dead soldiers on the battlefield. It was a contested therapy because it meant crossing boundaries and challenging tabo…
 
The Red Sea has, from time immemorial, been one of the world’s most navigated spaces, in the pursuit of trade, pilgrimage and conquest. Yet this multidimensional history remains largely unrevealed by its successive protagonists. Intrigued by the absence of a holistic portrayal of this body of water and inspired by Fernand Braudel’s famous work on t…
 
In the mid-1870s, the experimental therapy of lamb blood transfusion spread like an epidemic across Europe and the USA. Doctors tried it as a cure for tuberculosis, pellagra and anemia; proposed it as a means to reanimate seemingly dead soldiers on the battlefield. It was a contested therapy because it meant crossing boundaries and challenging tabo…
 
In her book, Statelessness: A Modern History (Harvard University Press, 2020), Mira L. Siegelberg traces the history of the concept of statelessness in the years following the First and Second World Wars. At its core, this thoughtful monograph is an intellectual history of an idea that jurists in the United States and Europe struggled to agree upon…
 
Between the years 1964 and 1974, Ethiopian post-secondary students studying at home, in Europe, and in North America produced a number of journals where they explored the relationship between social theory and social change within the project of building a socialist Ethiopia. Ethiopia in Theory: Revolution and Knowledge Production, 1964-2016 (Brill…
 
Eric Levin is CEO of Scripta Insights. Eric is a seasoned executive and serial entrepreneur who has created and managed products that have sold well in excess of $5 billion. He has been involved in more than 32 mergers and acquisitions and helped to grow several companies from startup through large-scale global success. After beginning his career a…
 
The implied answer to the titular question of All Bullshit and Lies? (Oxford University Press 2020) is no, it’s not. In this book, subtitled Insincerity, Irresponsibility, and the Judgment of Untruthfulness, Chris Heffer argues that to analyze untruthfulness, we need a framework which goes beyond these two kinds of speech acts, bullshitting and lyi…
 
Joshua Kotin’s Utopias of One (Princeton University Press, 2017) analyzes a particular and peculiar sub-genre of utopian literature. Kotin identifies works by Thoreau, Dubois, the Mandel’shtams, and the poets Wallace Stevens, Ezra Pound, and J.H. Prynne as “utopias of one.” In these works, the authors at one and the same time publish for an externa…
 
In January 2020, the UK became the first country to leave the European Union after a troubled 47-year membership. What was at the core of the country’s semi-detachment to the EU? Was the UK’s eventual inevitable or was it a tragedy of errors and misunderstandings borne of divergent political cultures? What does the future hold for the relationship?…
 
In The Fury Archives: Female Citizenship, Human Rights, and the International Avant-Gardes (Columbia UP 2020), Jill Richards radically rewrites our understanding of first-wave feminism by demonstrating its proximity to international avant-garde movements including surrealism, Dada, and futurism. Using case studies including the movement for a prole…
 
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