The History Of The Plague In London public
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Our podcasts are a mix of conversations with a wide range of subject matter experts and enthusiasts, interspersed with the occasional audio drama. Each episode focuses on one person, a group of people or a genre from the world of entertainment that we wish to bring back to the spotlight and who has been lost to history or is in danger of being so.The Arts industries are currently in peril but this is nothing new. The Entertainment industry in all its guises has seen it all before. Political ...
 
The History of the Plague in London is a historical novel offering an account of the dismal events caused by the Great Plague, which mercilessly struck the city of London in 1665. First published in 1722, the novel illustrates the social disorder triggered by the outbreak, while focusing on human suffering and the mere devastation occupying London at the time. Defoe opens his book with the introduction of his fictional character H.F., a middle-class man who decides to wait out the destructio ...
 
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Demons and Dames

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Demons and Dames

Demons and Dames the Podcast

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Demons and Dames is a tongue-in-cheek feminist history podcast. Ashley Mauritzen and Sarah Worley-Hill dive deep into the stories of notorious women who shaped history - by design or simply by being in the right (or wrong) time or place. We examine how they were viewed by their contemporaries, and how and why their stories have been interpreted, shaped and passed down. We also laugh. A lot.
 
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Clara Schumann, a pianist, composer and piano teacher. And wife of Robert Schumann. Clara Wieck had a fascinating life- a child prodigy, like Mozart before her she was touring as a concert pianist under the watchful eye of her domineering father from a very young age. She went on to marry Robert, have eight children and continue to work in the male…
 
Ally Sloper's Half-Holiday was the name of a weekly comic strip which first appeared on 3 May 1884. Before Superman, Spiderman, Desperate Dan and Dennis the Menace came Ally Sloper. From 1884 until the 1920s, the red-nosed social climber who poked fun at the English people and their customs was a household name and national favourite. Ally Sloper t…
 
The British Music Hall Society's annual online celebration of "Music Hall and Variety Day" is on 16th May. It's an annual online event now in its third year where all sorts of videos, audio recordings, pictures, posters and anecdotes are shared. It's great fun and a really good excuse to sort out the archives and take a look to see what's hidden at…
 
Who was Fred Karno? and what was his army? We talk to David Crump whose biography of today's subject reveals all - and some! Karno was a giant personality who had a giant effect on theatre and cinema as we know it. The man who gave Stan Laurel, Charlie Chaplin and the Crazy Gang their first break and almost single handedly invented the type of slap…
 
Back in the dark days of Lockdown number 2 at the end of 2020 Lottie and Linda were enjoying the TV series Harlots. Whilst chatting about it Lottie remembered seeing the blue plaque that is dedicated to Priss Fotheringham, the "second best whore in London". And the idea for a podcast episode was born! For reasons many and varied it's taken us a who…
 
Amanda Ira Aldridge, one of the most important female composers of the 20th century has been all but forgotten. Daughter of the groundbreaking actor Ira Aldridge, Amanda, was also a singer and in her latter years a voice teacher. One of her pupils was Paul Robeson who approached her when he cane to the UK to play Othello. He was only the second bla…
 
For this special episode we've moved away from talking about our long forgotten heroes of history to talk to our very much up to date award winning theatre-maker - and hero - Christopher Green. Christopher is a huge advocate of theatre as an experience and of the "all the world's a stage" ethos. In this conversation we talk about experiential theat…
 
Fred Barnes was a huge star in his time, but his fame, fortune and undeniable glamour hid a tragic story and self-destructive nature. Christopher Green and John Orchard talk to Lottie about Fred Barnes' tragic life and death, how he has been almost written out of history and their own projects to bring him back into popular culture. A blue plaque t…
 
Vesta Tilley was possibly the most famous male impersonator of all time and a huge star of the Victorian Music Hall. The girl from Worcester, who was treading the boards from the age of 3 was also the wife of an MP and "Britain's best recruiting sergeant" during WW1. In this episode Ann-Lindsey Wickens tells us what it's like to portray this iconic…
 
"The Diary of a Nobody" has long been a favourite book of both Tim Shaw and Andy Smith. They've seen it on stage, listened to it on the radio and, of course, read it. So one rainy August day in Edinburgh after seeing Rodney Bewes in his on man version of 3 Men in a Boat and over a small sherry or two they hit upon the idea of adapting Charles Poote…
 
This season's audio drama is : The Diary of a Nobody, by George & Weedon Grossmith, said by Evelyn Waugh to be the "funniest book ever written". The book has never been out of print and is available at all good bookshops. This adaptation is by Tim Shaw. It is directed by Steve Taylor Charles Pooter - Andy Smith Carrie - Lottie Walker Lupin - Steve …
 
George Grossmith created many of Gilbert and Sullivan's comic baritone roles and was known for his delivery of the famous patter songs. He was also a writer and composer who entertained royalty in the parlours of palaces and a journalist who spent time as a Bow Street Court reporter. And, together with his brother Weedon he was responsible for prod…
 
The original "greatest showman" was not P.T. Barnum, it was a chap from Newcastle Under Lyme in Staffordshire, who went by the name Philip Astley. Astley was a soldier and talented equestrian who went on to invent what we now recognise as the modern day circus. His story is one of the many that prove that truth is stranger (certainly more remarkabl…
 
Margaret Monod talks about her blog, "Into the Limelight" and her fabulous collection of Music Hall postcards . Today's Podcast: Host: Lottie Guest: Margaret Monod Edited By: Jacob Taylor Music: James Hall This is a special bonus episode broadcast specially for the British Music Hall Society's Music Hall & Variety Day Follow Margaret on Twitter: @m…
 
Welcome back to "Famous People You've Never Heard Of"! We've some fabulous guests talking about some truly fabulous people and hope that you enjoy finding out about them all. Some of our contributors this season are: Stephen Bourne Lyn Brown MP Moira Buffini Christopher Green John Orchard Andrew van Buren And some of our wonderful subjects are: Ves…
 
A short message to reassure our listeners that you're not abandoned! We've had a slight delay but Series Two will be up and running soon. In the meantime, check out the show notes for all of Series One , which have been updated and do use this downtime to catch up on any episodes you've missed. If you want to revisit Episodes 3 and 4 (the ones that…
 
Alison Young is the Secretary of the British Music Hall Society. She ran away from the law to research and write about her family connections with the Music Hall and has uncovered many little gems that she shares with us today. "Dainty Daisy Dormer" was a Music Hall star. She was also Alison's great great aunt. She and her sisters toured around the…
 
Today's episode features writer and actor Paterson Joseph, author of the play "Sancho, An Act of Remembrance", which he has been performing for some 10 years and brings back to the theatre next year. He has also recently completed a book about Sancho, this incredible man who was born on a slave ship in the Atlantic and died a businessman in London.…
 
Nelly Power was a huge star of music hall who is now pretty much forgotten. In 2017/18 Blue Fire's Lottie Walker was researching the life of Marie Lloyd when she discovered Nelly, who was in fact the first person to sing the famous song "The Boy I Love Is Up in the Gallery". And made it her mission to get Ms Power the recognition she deserves. By 2…
 
Marie Lloyd, Queen of the Music Hall was a force of nature with a larger than life personality. At one time the highest paid act in the country, she sang a string of hit songs including "Oh, Mr Porter" and "Don't Dilly Dally on the Way". Finding fame at the age of 15 she spent the next 40 years entertaining on the music halls and vaudeville theatre…
 
Alice Thornton was an ordinary, if somewhat well to do woman of the 17th century. She lived through the time of Plague, the Great Fire of London, the English Civil War and the Restoration. But as the old saying says "there are no troubles as big as your own" and Alice's troubles (indeed tragedies), which were many are what she recorded in her diary…
 
Just before Christmas 2020 we had a jolly conversation with Kate Griffin, author of the "Kitty Peck" novels about her interest in music hall. Kate tells us about her love of theatre, how she fell in love with music hall and Jenny Hall, the real artiste that Kitty Peck is based on. We also talk about principal boys, theatre ghosts and what pantomime…
 
Renata Kobetts Miller is Professor of English and Deputy Dean of Humanities and the Arts at the City College of New York. Her book, "The Victorian Actress in the Novel and on the Stage" begins in the 1830s and ends in the 1910s. It looks at how Victorian novels and plays used the actress, who was a significant figure for the relationship between wo…
 
Alison Young is the Secretary of the British Music Hall Society. She ran away from the law to research and write about her family connections with the Music Hall and has uncovered many little gems that she shares with us today. "Dainty Daisy Dormer" was a Music Hall star. She was also Alison's great great aunt. She and her sisters toured around the…
 
Today's episode features writer and actor Paterson Joseph, author of the play "Sancho, An Act of Remembrance", which he has been performing for some 10 years and brings back to the theatre next year. He has also recently completed a book about Sancho, this incredible man who was born on a slave ship in the Atlantic and died a businessman in London.…
 
Author and playwright David Slattery Christy, talks to us about his grandfather, Reg Pratley. Reg's story shines a light on the social history of the early 20th Century. From growing up in a sleepy Oxfordshire village via a short spell in the Royal Navy, Reg Pratley ended up managing one of the largest and most prestigious travelling fairgrounds in…
 
Here's what to expect in our first series of "Famous People You've Never Heard Of" Amongst others our special guests this season include actor and writer Dr Debbie Cannon, author David Slattery Christy and actor and writer Paterson Joseph. Join us as they take us on journeys into the past to discover tales of fame, fortune and failure in the worlds…
 
“What the people want is very simple - they want an America as good as its promise.” ― Barbara Jordan Join Sarah and our guest, Dr Tom Packer as they explore the exception life of Barbara Jordan - American lawyer, educator and politician who was a leader at the heart of the Civil Rights Movement. Barbara Jordan is an inspirational politician and or…
 
“I sometimes stare into the blackness and close my eyes. I can still imagine myself as a young girl, up there in my little bomber. And I ask myself, ‘Nadia, how did you do it?’ ” So reminisced Nadezhda Popova, one of the legendary "Nitght Witches" and pilot for the Soviet's 588th Night Bomber Aviation Regiment. The 588th was the only all-female bom…
 
Join us for this exciting bonus episode in which Sarah interviews Sophie Dodds and Willa Bews from the band Storm the Palace. Sophie and Willa talk about two of their favorite musicians - Dory Previn and Carol Kaye - as well as their own music and what inspires them as song writers. The episode ends with Sarah's favorite Storm the Palace song, 'Fra…
 
London, 1665. "Thus this month ends with great sadness upon the publick, through the greatness of the plague every where through the kingdom almost. Every day sadder and sadder news of its encrease. In the City died this week 7,496 and of them 6,102 of the plague. But it is feared that the true number of the dead, this week is near 10,000; partly f…
 
Paris, 1934. In this episode, Sarah explores a murder that captivated 1930s France - so much so that during the Nuremberg rally, the left-wing daily L’Oeuvre published a cartoon in which a peeved Nazi officer waved a newspaper at Hitler over a caption that read: “That Violette! It’s all about her!”. Join Sarah and her guest, the wonderful Sophie, a…
 
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