show episodes
 
Every week, join award-winning narrator B.J. Harrison as he narrates the greatest stories the world has ever known. From the jungles of South America to the Mississippi Delta, from Victorian England to the sands of the Arabian desert, join us on a fantastic journey through the words of the world's greatest authors. Critically-acclaimed and highly recommended for anyone who loves a good story with plenty of substance.
 
Written by New York Times bestselling author Rachel Hawkins, this historical horror story traps a group of sleuths in a haunted house desperate to escape the wrath of a vengeful ghost. Beatrix Greene makes her living by playing pretend. She knows the seances she conducts are fake, but financial freedom for a single woman in Victorian England is hard to come by. So when notorious scientist James Walker makes her a proposition—prove that ghosts are real, once and for all, for a hefty price—she ...
 
The Mysteries of London was a best-selling novel in mid-Victorian England. The first series was published in weekly instalments from 1844-46, priced at a penny each. Serialised novels sold in this way were known as Penny Dreadfuls … without any claim to literary greatness, they sought to provide ongoing entertainment for the popular audience. This book has it all -- vice, poverty, wealth, virtue, in every combination. Consider it a Victorian soap opera.Summary by Cori Samuel.Note: this proje ...
 
George Oliver Onions (1873 – 1961) was a British writer of story collections and over 40 novels…. Onions wrote detective fiction, social comedy, historical fiction and romance novels. This social comedy of late Victorian England is among his first published materials. Rollo Butterfield, the compleat bachelor, looks upon his family and friends with an affectionate, gently humorous eye. - Summary by Wikipedia and david wales
 
Join Noah Tetzner (The History of Vikings podcast) for this fifteen-episode exploration of life and death during one of the most important periods in world history. Through interviews with scholars, biographers, and artists, the show will consider everyday life during the era, the battles that shaped the kingdom, the artists who gave voice to the people, and much more. Subscribe now! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
A steampunk, monster-hunting adventure through Victorian England and the surrounding Universes. It's steampunk Victorian England and monsters are invading the otherwise peaceful balls and tea parties. The Baroness, gutsy and eccentric, funds a team of monster hunters that include her brother, a scholar who recently found out he was the father of a teenager, her protegee, a young scientist whose mother wants her to spend more time flirting than tinkering with machines, and her man-servant Gun ...
 
Set in Victorian England, North and South is the story of Margaret Hale, a young woman whose life is turned upside down when her family relocates to northern England. As an outsider from the agricultural south, Margaret is initially shocked by the aggressive northerners of the dirty, smoky industrial town of Milton. But as she adapts to her new home, she defies social conventions with her ready sympathy and defense of the working poor. Her passionate advocacy leads her to repeatedly clash wi ...
 
A mysterious young widow arrives at Wildfell Hall, an Elizabethan mansion which has been empty for many years, with her young son. She lives there under an assumed name, Helen Graham, and very soon finds herself the victim of local slander. Refusing to believe anything scandalous about her, Gilbert Markham discovers her dark secrets. In her diary Helen writes about her husband's physical and moral decline through alcohol and the world of debauchery and cruelty from which she has fled. This p ...
 
Serial killers. Gangsters. Gunslingers. Victorian-era murderers. And that's just the tip of the iceberg. Each week, the Most Notorious podcast features true-life tales of crime, criminals, tragedies and disasters throughout history. This is an interview show, spotlighting authors and historians who have studied their subjects for years, and whose stories are offered with unique insight, detail, and historical accuracy.
 
This is a saga about life in a small town in England during the Victorian era. The "stars" of this saga are the Channings. Mr. Channing was ill and, because of his poverty, his six children have to work. Many things happen during this saga: a man confesses to a theft which he thinks his brother did, a lady is engaged to a gentleman much above her station, and so much more. But in the middle of all this you can find plenty of family love. (Summary by Stav Nisser)
 
Her father compels her to visit the biggest mansion in the village to “claim kin” with the aristocratic d'Urberville family. She falls prey to the debauched son of the house and returns home to give birth in secret to an illegitimate baby who lives only for a few days. Determined to put her past behind her, she goes to work as a milkmaid in a faraway country farmhouse where she falls in love with a good and kind young man. Her conscience troubles her and she confesses the truth about herself ...
 
The shortest novel by far of Charles Dickens', Hard Times is also one of his most idea based works. In it, he launches a scathing attack on the prevailing fashion of believing in Utilitarianism, a philosophy that proposed the goal of society should be “the greatest good for the greatest number of people.” Dickens felt that such a philosophy saw people as mere statistics and not as individuals. The novel was published in serial form in his magazine Household Words. It is also the only novel w ...
 
Originally published in monthly installments between 1855 and 1857, the novel focuses on the various forms of imprisonment, both physical and psychological, while also concentrating on dysfunctional family ties. Accordingly, Dickens avidly criticizes the social deficiencies of the time including injustice, social hypocrisy, the austerity of the Marshalsea debtors’ prison, and bureaucratic inefficiency. The novel kicks off with the introduction of William Dorrit, the oldest prisoner in the Ma ...
 
If you've never heard the term “Mathematical Fiction” before, Edwin Abbott Abbott's 1884 novella, Flatland can certainly enlighten you! Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions was published in 1884 and since then, it has been discovered and re-discovered by succeeding generations who have been delighted by its unique view of society and people. The plot opens with a description of the fictional Flatland. The narrator calls himself “Square” and asks readers to “Imagine a vast sheet of paper on ...
 
Rich and beautiful American girls heading to England to find themselves noble titles through marriage, and using their New World wealth to prop up the waning strength of the aristocracy, was almost a staple of late Victorian literature. "The Buccaneers," Edith Wharton called them, and their day is not over yet (think of Downton Abbey's Earl of Grantham, and his American heiress countess). In Lady Barbarina, however, Henry James explores the obverse of this old tale: what if the wealth is in ...
 
One of the most memorable scenes in this novel occurs in Chapter Twelve, when the dejected and desolate Silas Marner steps outside his lonely cottage on New Year's Eve. He suffers from one of his bizarre fits of catalepsy and stands frozen for a few seconds. When he regains consciousness, he returns to his fireside. There in front of the warm blaze he imagines he sees a heap of gold! The very gold that had been robbed from his house many years ago. He stretches out his hand to touch it. Inst ...
 
Welcome to Rebel Women, a podcast about the history of troublemakers in East London. This corner of Britain's capital has seen multiple waves of migration, poverty and persecution. Sometimes feared, always looked down upon, the residents have struggled. But out of these struggles rose up some of history's greatest radicals leaders - leaders of movements that have changed both the local landscape, and wider society too. Many of them were women. And most you will have never heard about, despit ...
 
Have you ever wondered what happened to Cinderella after she married the prince? Have you ever asked yourself if it was really "happy ever after?" Actually, in this Victorian melodrama, it's not. 35-years-old Emily Fox-Seton, quite penniless and a little lonely, saves herself from becoming an old maid by agreeing to a marriage proposal from the marquess of Walderhurst, thus becoming "one of the richest Marchionesses in England". She is naïve, kind and good. She doesn't believe that people ar ...
 
Dracula tells the tale of a sinister Transylvanian aristocrat who seeks to retain his youth and strength by feeding off human blood. The author, Bram Stoker, a young Victorian theater professional, was probably inspired by the strange epidemic of vampirism that occurred in remote parts of Eastern Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries. These stories were recounted by travelers who later arrived in England and other parts of Western Europe. Stoker initially meant the tale to be written as a pl ...
 
An American diplomat's family moves into an ancient stately mansion. They're warned by the owner that it is haunted by a most horrifying and gruesome spirit who had once cruelly murdered his own wife. The story progresses with creaking floor boards, mysterious passages, dark attics, clanking chains, and weird howling. Yet, the reader is totally unprepared for Oscar Wilde's brand of tongue in cheek humor as he takes all the ingredients of a traditional ghost story and turns it on its head, an ...
 
One of the most delightful and enduring classics of children's literature, The Secret Garden by Victorian author Frances Hodgson Burnett has remained a firm favorite with children the world over ever since it made its first appearance. Initially published as a serial story in 1910 in The American Magazine, it was brought out in novel form in 1911. The plot centers round Mary Lennox, a young English girl who returns to England from India, having suffered the immense trauma by losing both her ...
 
For more than a century and a quarter, fans of detective fiction have enjoyed the doings of the iconic sleuth, Mr. Sherlock Holmes. In the company of his faithful companion, Dr Watson, Holmes has consistently delighted generations of readers. Created by a Scottish writer and physician, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, this immortal private eye has solved cases for kings and commoners, lovely damsels and little old ladies, engineers and country squires and a legion of others who come to him in distres ...
 
Inspired by a true life story, Lady Audley's Secret is the story of a woman's overwhelming ambition and passion for social success. When the first book came out in 1862, Victorian readers were shocked and outraged by its portrayal of aspects like bigamy, insanity, yearning for social status and the will to commit murder to achieve one's goals. The novel belongs to a genre that became very popular during that era. Known as “sensation novels” they can probably be equated to today's pulp fictio ...
 
In 2016-7, Ian McDonald tells one epic tale - the backstory to today's vegetarian and vegan movements. From the Ganges delta to the hills of New England, from the iron age to the present day, voices challenge the idea that other animals exist soley for humans. Discover philosopher kings, rebel poets, and forgotten heroes. Stories from vegan perspectives. Great radio that just happens to be vegan. This is The Vegan Option.
 
Whether you're a parent or a child, a young reader or an older one, the Great Big Treasury of Beatrix Potter is indeed just that – a treasure chest of delightful, charming little stories full of animals and people. Beatrix Potter today has spawned a whole industry of merchandise, games and theme parks, but the stories remain as fresh and sparkling as they were when they first came out in 1901. The Great Big Treasury contains three collections compiled into one enchanting volume - The Giant T ...
 
Tailored specially to make history more palatable and interesting to children, Our Island Story, by Henrietta Elizabeth Marshall, is a charmingly illustrated volume that promises hours of delight for parents as well as children. Beginning with the myths and legends about Albion, the author ensures that she captivates the child's imagination from the very first page. Unlike today's dry and non-committal history tomes that are prescribed in schools, Our Island Story is full of lyrical prose, l ...
 
Considered to be one of the books that changed the world and how we view ourselves, On The Origin of Species by Charles Darwin was met with incredulous horror when it was first published in 1859. The revolutionary, almost blasphemous ideas it described were seen as antithetical to the existing ideas of Creation contained in the Bible and other religious texts. It was mocked, reviled and the author was personally subjected to vicious persecution by the establishment and theologians. In the ye ...
 
First published in 1863, The Water Babies by Rev Charles Kingsley became a Victorian children's classic along with J.M. Barrie's Peter Pan and Lewis Caroll's Alice books. It is an endearing and entertaining novel that can equally be enjoyed by adult readers as well. However, it fell out of favor in later years since it contained many ideas that are considered politically incorrect and offensive today from a humanitarian perspective. The Water Babies, A Fairy Tale for a Land Baby to give the ...
 
This story opens at a fashionable dinner party in Sir Robert Chiltern's home in the heart of London's stylish Grosvenor Square. One of Lady Chiltern's old school-friends, Mrs. Cheveley, a woman with a dubious past, accosts Sir Robert and threatens to expose a financial crime that he had once participated in, unless he agrees to finance a fraudulent construction project that she's promoting. Lady Chiltern is astounded when her husband who had been the severest critic of this project suddenly ...
 
If this is your first encounter with Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog) you're certainly in for a treat! One of the most delightful examples of Victorian humor, this book by Jerome K Jerome is all the way a fun cruise down the Thames River with some funny characters for company. Three Men in a Boat was originally meant to be a serious piece of travel writing, full of local flavors, legends and folklore about England's mighty river. As it turned out, somewhere along the way, the ...
 
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show series
 
Audra Wolfe talks to Merle and Lee about her work on scientific freedom during the Cold War and how it still shapes ideas about objectivity and politics in science to the present. After framing the discussion about the Cold War, Audra explains the notion of scientific freedom that supposedly allowed scientists to develop their own research agenda w…
 
Can young Beautrelet really solve a crime which absolutely baffles the police? Maurice Leblanc, today on The Classic Tales Podcast. Welcome to The Classic Tales Podcast. Thank you for listening. Thank you to all of our financial supporters. We couldn’t do this without you. We really try make your support worth your while. You get so much out of thi…
 
13. Random Scottish History - 'Treaty of Union Articles' - Why the English May Feel Free to Usurp Scottish Law Podcast versions of Articles of the Treaty of Union between Scotland and England, as ratified at Edinburgh, 16th January, 1707 by kind permission of Jenny Eeles of Random Scottish History You can follow Jenny on Twitter https://twitter.com…
 
A slight departure from the normal format for the TNT Show this week, as host John Drummond welcomes two guests, Zoe Venditozzi and Claire Mitchell QC to discuss the dark period in Scottish history when innocent people, mainly women, found themselves accused of witchcraft. Zoe and Claire have their own podcast: www.witchesofscotland.com/podcast The…
 
In November of 1912, a young woman named Ella Barham journeyed home, on her horse, to her family farm in Boone County, Arkansas, but never arrived. After her body was discovered, murdered and dismembered, suspicions quickly centered on a neighbor, Odus Davidson, who was rumored to have been in love with Ella, a love never returned. My guest, Nita G…
 
SCOTONOMICS. Nourishment for independent minds. Economics professor Fadhel Kaboub https://twitter.com/FadhelKaboub Outlines what it means to have true economic sovereignty. He discussed how and why small/medium sized nations like Scotland must strive for sovereignty. Monetary sovereignty is the most important aspect of sovereignty and this underpin…
 
This is Rebel Women for kids, a new podcast for … well kids. It's full of amazing stories of daring and adventure, and the best thing is that all these stories are completely true. And even though this is a podcast for you kids, we think your grown ups might quite enjoy it too. It’s easy to take the NHS for granted, but not that long ago it didn’t …
 
On Indylive.radio's Saturday Show DJ James E interviews up and coming Dublin musician Paul McDonnell, otherwise known as A Band Called Paul. Find out more about A Band Called Paul and hear some of the latest music on the Facebook page @abandcalledpaul or the website abandcalledpaul.comBy YesCowal Podcasts
 
Zachary Dorner (University of Maryland) comes on to discuss his new book, Merchants of Medicine, which discusses the role of merchants, commerce, and capitalism in changing how medicine was made, administered, and thought about across the 18th century. Zack discusses the ideas about medicine before the 18th century and then highlights the dramatic …
 
A special episode of the Locker Room while the normal programme is taking its summer break, Michael's guest is Gavin MacLeod, Chief Executive of Scottish Disability Sports. Tune in to https://indylive.radio at 4pm on Monday 14th for the first of our live reaction shows immediately following Scotland's Euro games…
 
Who will solve the case of an attempted burglary that led to murder? Is an ambitious young student really the best option? Maurice Leblanc, today on The Classic Tales Podcast. Welcome to The Classic Tales Podcast. Thank you for listening. Thank you to all of our financial supporters. We couldn’t do this without you. We really try make your support …
 
17. Random Scottish History - 'Treaty of Union Articles' - Collection of Thistledown’s Correspondence Podcast versions of Articles of the Treaty of Union between Scotland and England, as ratified at Edinburgh, 16th January, 1707 by kind permission of Jenny Eeles of Random Scottish History You can follow Jenny on Twitter https://twitter.com/FlikeNoi…
 
12. Random Scottish History - 'Treaty of Union Articles' - An Appeal to Scots from a Victorian Podcast versions of Articles of the Treaty of Union between Scotland and England, as ratified at Edinburgh, 16th January, 1707 by kind permission of Jenny Eeles of Random Scottish History You can follow Jenny on Twitter https://twitter.com/FlikeNoir You c…
 
TÙS is an hour-long chat about life, language and lore. Each month, we'll welcome an indigenous guest from somewhere else on Planet Earth and learn about how they and their people see the world. Hosted by Scottish Gael Àdhamh MacLeòid, his first guest is Karenniyo of the Mohawk Nation Turtle Clan. She hails from Six Nations of the Grand River in On…
 
Imprisoned in a Turkish war camp during WW1, two British officers pull off an unbelievable con against their captors involving a Ouija board, an angry ghost and feigned madness - leading to a truly astonishing escape. My guest is bestselling author Margalit Fox, author of "Confidence Men: How Two Prisoners of War Engineered the Most Remarkable Esca…
 
Janet Kay (Princeton) returns to the Infectious Historians to discuss her promised after action report on teaching her 100 person course, The Art & Archaeology of Plague, at Princeton University. After reminding listeners about the structure of the course, Janet discusses two key features: plague simulations and the guest lecturers from around the …
 
Will Lantry succeed in creating an army of living dead? Ray Bradbury, today on The Classic Tales Podcast. Welcome to The Classic Tales Podcast. Thank you for listening. Thank you to all of our financial supporters. We couldn’t do this without you. We really try make your support worth your while. You get so much out of this! For a five-dollar month…
 
Welcome to the May/June issue of Team Talk, our Indylive Radio audio newsletter. In this issue we look back on our Holyrood election coverage and look forward to some special reaction shows following Scotland's Euro matches. You can check our schedule for timings on www.indylive.radio/radioschedule. We also find out what interviews James E has in t…
 
This week, we would like to introduce you to Dark Heights, a new show from Realm, the studio that brought you Beatrix Greene. Listen and subscribe to Dark Heights wherever you get your podcasts, or visit https://www.realm.fm/shows/dark-heights In this modern dark fantasy, a small California town—and three people within it—become the targets of an a…
 
Robin Scheffler (MIT) joins the Infectious Historians to discuss his recent book on cancer. Robin begins the interview with a broad discussion of cancer and the different ways it was perceived and conceptualized over the past century. The discussion touches upon topics such as the so-called “war” on cancer and its meaning; cancer and gender; some o…
 
How will William Lantry live in a world where no one knows him? For he was born 350 years ago, and he just got out of his grave. Ray Bradbury, today on The Classic Tales Podcast. Welcome to The Classic Tales Podcast. Thank you for listening. Thank you to all of our financial supporters. We couldn’t do this without you. We really try make your suppo…
 
Albert Johnson is famous in Canadian crime history for leading Mounties on a sensational and deadly chase through the Yukon and Northwest Territories during the winter of 1931-32. How he managed to elude police over hundreds of kilometers in subzero temperatures through a mountainous wilderness is as much a mystery as his real identity. To this day…
 
Abigail Dumes (University of Michigan) sits down to talk to Merle and Lee about her anthropological work on Lyme Disease and how it has shaped ideas about long term disease effects on people. After defining Lyme Disease and why its numbers have increased over the last few decades, she turns to the debate over clinical diagnosis of the disease and t…
 
The second of James E's interviews with author Ethyl Smith, this time talking about books 3 and 4 of her series set in the time of the Covenanters, entitled Broken Times and Desperate Times. Ethyl's books are available from Thunderpoint Bookshop, plus all the usual booksellers. Her facebook page is @changedtimesscottishhistoricalfiction and you can…
 
How will Click and Irish survive being marooned on a pirate’s asteroid with only a single gun and a news reel camera to defend themselves? Ray Bradbury, today on The Classic Tales Podcast. Welcome to The Classic Tales Podcast. Thank you for listening. Thank you to all of our financial supporters. We couldn’t do this without you. We really try make …
 
Most of us are familiar with the critically acclaimed film called Catch Me If You Can, based on the autobiography of legendary confidence man Frank Abagnale. It's the story of a brazen teenage imposter who through charm and intellect was able to pass as an attorney, a doctor, a pilot and a university professor in the late 1960s and early 1970s. My …
 
Matheus Duarte (University of St. Andrews) comes on the podcast to talk to Merle and Lee about his work on turn of the 20th century plague in Brazil and its impact on creating the field of microbiology. After a brief introduction to disease history in Brazil at the time, Matheus discusses the impact and immediate non-medical responses to the plague…
 
Why does Old Jones insist that anyone who sees The Phantom Hearse stop outside their place of an evening, will die within the week? Mary Fortune, today on The Classic Tales Podcast. Welcome to The Classic Tales Podcast. Thank you for listening. Thank you to all of our financial supporters. We couldn’t do this without you. We really try make your su…
 
We are grateful to the National Yes Registry for sharing their excellent event with Stephen Gethins, discussing his new book entitled "Nation to nation", looking at Scotland's Place in the World and taking questions from the audience.By YesCowal Podcasts
 
In 1897 a Belgian named Adrien de Gerlache, in command of a ship called the Belgica, sailed to Antarctica with the intent to be the first to reach the south magnetic pole. On the expedition was Norwegian Roald Amundsen, who would later become one of the world's most famous explorers, and Doctor Frederick Cook, who would become one of America's grea…
 
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