show episodes
 
Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Science Weekly podcast will now explore some of the crucial scientific questions about Covid-19. Led by its usual hosts Ian Sample, Hannah Devlin and Nicola Davis, as well as the Guardian's health editor Sarah Boseley, we’ll be taking questions – some sent by you – to experts on the frontline of the global outbreak. Send us your questions here: theguardian.com/covid19questions
 
Each week The Intercept’s Washington, D.C. bureau brings you one important or overlooked story from the political world. Bureau Chief Ryan Grim and a rotating cast of journalists, politicians, academics and historians tell you what the rest of the media are missing.
 
Here you'll find weekly motivation from some of the most successful and high achieving people in the world to help encourage you through your journey in life. Join Video Editor/Producer Ben Lionel Scott as he shares motivating messages from the most brilliant minds and high-performing people. To get access and download all audio and video versions from the show, plus exclusive content, go to benlionelscott.com/subscribe
 
Ever wanted to know how music affects your brain, what quantum mechanics really is, or how black holes work? Do you wonder why you get emotional each time you see a certain movie, or how on earth video games are designed? Then you’ve come to the right place. Each week, Sean Carroll will host conversations with some of the most interesting thinkers in the world. From neuroscientists and engineers to authors and television producers, Sean and his guests talk about the biggest ideas in science, ...
 
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show series
 
Some things can be salvaged. Some can be revived. Some can be restored. But sometimes, the only way to deal with something is to bury it. This is true of many things in our lives, including our misguided desires, misdirected ambition, and our misplaced hopes. However, like a small and seemingly-lifeless seed planted in the ground, life springs fort…
 
It all started when Sigrid E. Johnson was 62. She got a call from an old friend, asking her to participate in a study about DNA ancestry tests and ethnic identity. She agreed. Ms. Johnson thought she knew what the outcome would be. When she was 16, her mother told her that she had been adopted as an infant. Her biological mother was an Italian woma…
 
ABOUT THIS MESSAGE Our thoughts are powerful. They change our perspective, impact our decisions, and influence our habits. But what do we do when we become trapped by our thoughts, unable to escape negative and unhealthy thinking? Let’s learn what it means to take our thoughts captive and win the war in our minds. Learn more about Winning the War i…
 
On this episode of On Message, we chat with Brian Butler, president and CEO of Tampa-based Vistra Communications. —The leadership lessons from the Army that have helped him build a successful PR firm—Why he decided to write a personal op-ed about race relations and his own experiences as a Black man in the U.S—His thoughts on the future of the PR a…
 
After a series of high-profile terrorist attacks by Islamic extremists in France, the country finds itself in a heated debate over some of its most cherished values: laïcité, or secularism, and the principle of race-neutrality, or color-blindness, in public policy. A controversial new bill proposed by President Emmanuel Macron targeting "Islamic se…
 
Odessa is a four-part audio documentary series about one West Texas high school reopening during the pandemic — and the teachers, students and nurses affected in the process. For the past six months, The New York Times has documented students’ return to class at Odessa High School from afar through Google hangouts, audio diaries, phone calls and Fa…
 
This episode is spoken by Jocko Willink, Eric Thomas, John Burk, Andy Frisella. You can see more of Jocko Willink at tr.im/JockoWillink, Eric Thomas at tr.im/EricThomas, John Burk at tr.im/JohnBurk, Andy Frisella at tr.im/AndyFrisella. The music is Valhalla by Rok Nardin. You can see more of Rok Nardin at http://bit.ly/RokNardin.…
 
As Donald Trump prepares to address the crowds at the Conservative Political Action Conference this weekend, Jonathan Freedland speaks to Evan McMullin, who is leading the charge to create an alternative option to the current Republican party for conservatives. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/politicspod…
 
Five years ago, Judge Merrick B. Garland became a high-profile casualty of Washington’s political dysfunction. President Barack Obama selected him to fill the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, but Senate Republicans blocked his nomination. In the process, Mr. Garland became known for the job he didn’t get. Now, a…
 
The first UN climate change conference was held in 1995 in Berlin. More than two decades later, our planet remains on track for three degrees of warming above pre-industrial levels by the end of the century. The answer to avoiding this catastrophe is both simple and staggeringly complicated: drastically reducing and reversing the amount of carbon d…
 
Jessica Elgot and Polly Toynbee discuss the government’s latest plans to exit lockdown. Richard Partington and Charlotte Alldritt look ahead to next week’s budget, and Larry Elliott and Katy Balls discuss the man behind the budget, Rishi Sunak.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/politicspod…
 
When the pandemic was bearing down on New York last March, Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration issued a directive that allowed Covid-19 patients to be discharged into nursing homes in a bid to free up hospital beds for the sickest patients. It was a decision that had the potential to cost thousands of lives. Today, in the second part of our look at …
 
In July 2018, 12 youth soccer players and their coach found themselves trapped 6 miles deep in a cave with no food or water and depleting oxygen. The rock formed maze became almost completely submerged as the water rose to levels nearly impossible for survival. There was no light and no way to communicate with the outside world. The first season of…
 
Emma Barnett is the presenter of BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour, a gifted broadcaster whose forensic interviewing style has reduced politicians to gibbering wrecks and whose compassion and insight can move listeners to tears. She's also the author of Period: It’s About Bloody Time, a book borne out of her own experience of living with painful endometri…
 
When New York was the epicenter of the pandemic in the United States, Gov. Andrew Cuomo emerged as a singular, strong leader. Now his leadership is embattled, particularly over the extent of deaths in nursing homes during the peak. Today, in the first of two parts on what went wrong in New York's nursing homes, we look at the crisis through the eye…
 
What would it be like if the Earth’s magnetic pole switched? Migrating animals and hikers would certainly need to reset their compasses, but could it play real havoc with life on Earth? Analysing the rings of an ancient tree pulled from a bog in New Zealand, researchers have been investigating what happened the last time north and south flipped – 4…
 
In our postmodern world, studying the classics of ancient Greece and Rome can seem quaint at best, downright repressive at worst. (We are talking about works by dead white men, after all.) Do we still have things to learn from classical philosophy, drama, and poetry? Shadi Bartsch offers a vigorous affirmative to this question in two new books comi…
 
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