Wendy Ring, Climate Radio Producer And Podcaster public
[search 0]
More

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Loading …
show series
 
In Vermont it's now illegal to throw your apple core in the trash. Vermont's Universal Recycling Law aka "the landfill ban" went into effect last year. It cuts landfill methane by diverting food to feed the hungry and the soil, as well as banning other recyclables. How did they do that? How is it going? What does it matter where that apple decompos…
 
Personal stories from 3 activists fighting to preserve slow and car free streets in San Francisco. A little known federal manual is keeping streets car-centric while pedestrians and cyclists die in record numbers. While activists battle for improvements block by block, Pete Buttigieg has a chance to rewrite the whole book and spur nationwide transf…
 
3 stories about the power of community to raise and multiply funding for climate action. A town taxes itself for free transit. Communities crowdfund for composting (and more). A Green Bank spurs 400 MW of solar. Storytellers: Robert Pollin-Political Economy Research Institute, Clark Gilman- Mayor ProTem Olympia WA Ann Freeman Manzanares- InterCity …
 
There's a lot of farmland about to change hands. We can make sure it's distributed fairly to good stewards. This show looks at agricultural land trusts and conservation easements aimed at helping young and under-resourced farmers get access to land, and at the history of Black land loss and the Justice for Black Farmers Act. We also explore an anti…
 
When Teaneck NJ Girl Scouts saw pictures of birds tangled in plastic bags, they got to work and sparked a movement that led to the strongest state plastic ban in the US. This is an engaging story about how big change happens when local efforts add up; with side trips into the chemistry of plastics, the importance of plankton poop, and comics as a m…
 
How do we turn farming from climate pollution to climate solution? In Part 1 of this mini-series we learn how changes in farming and ranching could remove gigatons of carbon from the atmosphere. A carbon farmer and rancher tell their stories and we begin our search for ways to spread these farming innovations across the country. First we talk with …
 
Climate and science super PACs are a donor's best bet for getting climate leaders elected to public office. While 50% of direct progressive campaign contributions go to waste, these super PACs focus resources where they can do the most good, training and supporting climate candidates. We talk with RL Miller of Climate Hawks Vote, Shaunessy Naughton…
 
There are millions of Americans who care deeply about climate change but rarely cast their ballots. A home-based army of volunteers is changing that. The Environmental Voter Project and Vote Forward both target and motivate these infrequent voters. Their founders, Nathaniel Stinnett and Scott Forman, explain how this began, why it's working, and ho…
 
For the 3 out of 4 Americans who can't put solar panels on their roofs, community solar gardens are a way to save money now and be part of building our clean energy future. When Minnesota enacted policy to promote solar gardens, it became the national leader, unleashing 600 megawatts of community solar development, but obstacles persist in parts of…
 
The solar cooperative movement began with two teenagers going door to door in their neighborhood in Washington DC. Their work grew into a national organization helping neighbors around the country go solar together, and building a grassroots movement for clean energy for all. Solar United Neighbors works alongside community organizations, providing…
 
You don't have to be an extrovert to do something big for the planet. Food Rescue US is a smartphone app developed by a pastor and a programmer that harnesses our collective good intentions to solve the difficult problem of food waste. The app connects businesses and farms with food to donate, agencies feeding the hungry, and volunteers into effici…
 
Health researchers are planting 8000 trees in Louisville, one of the fastest warming cities in the US, in an effort to discover why trees appear to prevent heart disease. We talk with members of the research team from the University of Louisville, the City of Louisville's urban forester, the Nature Conservancy, and Louisville Grows, a local group w…
 
Our own preconceptions of who is "on our side" and the mistaken idea that we are alone may be one of the biggest obstacles to climate action. That's the big takeaway from this story about how neighbors, longshoremen, small businesspeople, tribes and environmentalists in Washington State got together and stopped a massive oil by rail terminal. Linda…
 
Story of how residents of South Portland Maine, a town of 25,000, stopped the export of tar sands from their port. We follow the story from a few people in a living room to overflow attendance at city council and the council's vote to ban tar sands and stand firm against Big Oil's lawsuit. Moving testimony by children, grandparents, fishermen and o…
 
Solar streetlights are hyperlocal clean energy that can help US cities survive extreme weather events and break free of utility monopolies. We visit 3 cities where solar street lights do a fine job lighting the streets, but also do much more. In a struggling rustbelt city, they're a beacon of hope for sustainable development. In a high end housing …
 
How many people does it take to change what runs a city's light bulbs? In Norman Oklahoma and Hanover New Hampshire, they started with 12 and ended up with everyone. Adrienne Gautier, Janna Horn and Judi Colla talk about organizing "for" instead of "against", and tell how they got their towns to vote unanimously for 100% clean energy. We talk with …
 
We already have too much parking. Getting rid of requirements to build more is something any town can do. It cuts carbon, boosts business, and helps affordable housing. Here's the story of 2 cities that did it. Matthew Petty, a city councilman in Fayetteville, Arkansas, and Nadine Marrero, Director of Planning and Zoning for the City of Buffalo tal…
 
People in Macon, GA got tired of waiting and made their own bike lanes. Progress ensued. Josh Rogers of New Town Macon and Rachel Hollar of Bike Walk Macon tell their story. Tactical urbanist Mike Lydon and epidemiologist Neil Maizlish help us look deeper into DIY street redesign and the health and safety benefits of protected bike lanes.…
 
Meet Food Service Directors from 2 public school districts serving vegetarian lunches once a week and producing long lasting benefit in students' diets and health. Topics along the way include Farm to School, climate impacts of various meats, and tips on shifting to a more plant based diet.By Wendy Ring for Cool Solutions
 
Small entrepreneurs across the country are creating jobs and local food by composting food waste locally. We get down to the nitty gritty with eco-entrepreneurs in Boston, Chicago, and San Diego, talk with a soil scientist about the benefits of composting, and learn from a lawyer about overcoming the barriers to diverting food from landfills.…
 
Diesel exhaust is bad for child and planetary health, but change is on the way. We talk with the transportation director of Twin Rivers Unified School District and meet the people transforming the nation's biggest public transit program, including clean air advocates, electric bus builders, parent activists, and a guy called the Electric Bus Evange…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2022 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login