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Comedians Jon Lunger and Glen Tickle are rewriting all of Wikipedia off the top of their heads without doing any research. Each week they take a listener suggestion for a topic, or get the topic from a special guest. We're in no way affiliated with Wikipedia. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/improvisedwikipedia/support
 
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Baby Geniuses

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Baby Geniuses

maximumfun.org, Lisa Hanawalt, Emily Heller, Rob Pera

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Baby Geniuses is a show for people who know stuff and people who don't know stuff, but would like to. Every week, comedian and super-genius Emily Heller and cartoonist and mastermind Lisa Hanawalt, challenge their guests to share some knowledge on any topic they want.
 
Young Laroon plans to marry Isabel, but Father Martin manipulates Isabel's father, Jourdain, in order to seduce Isabel. However, other characters, including both of the Laroons, try to manipulate Jourdain for their own ends; they accomplish it through disguising themselves as priests and using his guilt to convince him of what they say. As Father Martin pursues Isabel, she is clever enough to realize what is happening and plans her own trap. After catching him and exposing his lust, Father M ...
 
Shakespeare's Sonnets, or simply The Sonnets, comprise a collection of 154 poems in sonnet form written by William Shakespeare that deal with such themes as love, beauty, politics, and mortality. The poems were probably written over a period of several years. (Summary from wikipedia)
 
There are questions the internet just can't answer. But that doesn't mean we can't find them. On each episode of Underunderstood, we find a question the internet can’t answer — maybe it’s a dead-end Wikipedia page, an abandoned Reddit thread, or an unanswered question on Twitter — and we fill in the gaps. It’s part chat show, part documentary, and almost always surprising.
 
Matt and David put their theater degrees to good use. By talking about musical theater! What's the plot of the show? What's the juicy backstage drama? What's on the Wikipedia page? Come, sit a spell, and learn about shows that aren't Rent! Theme Music by James Higgens https://www.iamjameshiggins.com/ Cover Art by Elizabeth Brozek https://www.elizabethbrozek.com/
 
LibriVox volunteers bring you 21 recordings of Seaside by Rupert Brooke. This was the Weekly Poetry project for August 19, 2012.Rupert Chawner Brooke (middle name sometimes given as "Chaucer" was an English poet known for his idealistic war sonnets written during the First World War, especially "The Soldier". He was also known for his boyish good looks, which were said to have prompted the Irish poet W. B. Yeats to describe him as "the handsomest young man in England" ( Summary from Wikipedia )
 
The Tinker's Wedding is a two-act play written by Irish playwright J. M. Synge. The author's only comedy, it is set on a roadside near a chapel in rural Ireland. (summary by Wikipedia)Cast:Michael Byrne: mbMary Byrne: Elizabeth KlettSarah Casey: Arielle LipshawA Priest: Algy PugNarrator: Frances BrownAudio edited by: Arielle Lipshaw
 
Join me on 'What’s On Your Mind?', as I interview guests about their weekly musings and Wikipedia rabbit holes. Like toxic beauty standards. Or, the impact of redlining. Or, bees. Whatever it is, we process it together. We'll all learn a little something and take another step in creating our own stories - all while adding another laugh line to your face.
 
Irvin Shrewsbury Cobb (June 23, 1876–March 11, 1944) was an American author, humorist, and columnist who lived in New York and wrote over 60 books and 300 short stories. Cobb has been described as "having a round shape, bushy eyebrows, full lips, and a triple chin. He always had a cigar in his mouth." This book is a hilarious account of Cobb's attempts at weight-loss. (Summary from wikipedia)
 
The Gambler is a short novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky about a young tutor in the employment of a formerly wealthy Russian general. The novella reflects Dostoevsky's own addiction to roulette, which was in more ways than one the inspiration for the book: Dostoevsky completed the novella under a strict deadline so he could pay off gambling debts. (Summary from Wikipedia)
 
Generally acknowledged to be the first sequel to the work of Jane Austen, Old Friends and New Fancies incorporates characters from each of Austen's six major novels into one unified story, as well as those of Brinton's own invention. The novel generally focuses on various parings of lovers and the challenges that their unions create. - Summary by Wikipedia
 
The Plastic Age (1924) is a novel by Percy Marks, which tells the story of co-eds at a fictional college called Sanford. With contents that covered or implied hazing, partying, and "petting", the book sold well enough to be the second best-selling novel of 1924. The following year, it was adapted into a film of the same name, starring Clara Bow. (Introduction from Wikipedia)
 
Common Sense, Paine's pro-independence monograph published anonymously on 10 January 1776, spread quickly among literate colonists. Within three months, 120,000 copies are alleged to have been distributed throughout the colonies, which themselves totaled only four million free inhabitants, making it the best-selling work in 18th-century America. Its total sales in both America and Europe reached 500,000 copies. It convinced many colonists, including George Washington and John Adams, to seek ...
 
The Book of Revelation, also called Revelation to John or Apocalypse of John, (literally, apocalypse of John; Greek, Αποκαλυψις Ιωαννου, Apokalupsis Iōannou) (IPA: [əˈpɑkəlɪps]) is the last canonical book of the New Testament in the Bible. It is the only biblical book that is wholly composed of apocalyptic literature. The visions given in this book were future events for the understanding of the early church, primarily.(Summary from Wikipedia and Sam Stinson)
 
Reflections on the Revolution in France is a 1790 book by Edmund Burke, one of the best-known intellectual attacks against the (then-infant) French Revolution. In the twentieth century, it much influenced conservative and classical liberal intellectuals, who recast Burke's Whig arguments as a critique of Communism and Socialist revolutionary programmes. (Summary by Wikipedia)
 
The American Senator is a novel written in 1875 by Anthony Trollope. Although not one of Trollope's better-known works, it is notable for its depictions of rural English life and for its many detailed fox hunting scenes. In its anti-heroine, Arabella Trefoil, it presents a scathing but ultimately sympathetic portrayal of a woman who has abandoned virtually all scruples in her quest for a husband. Through the eponymous Senator, Trollope offers comments on the irrational aspects of English lif ...
 
LibriVox volunteers bring you 17 recordings of After Music by Josephine Preston Peabody. This was the Weekly Poetry project for April 10, 2011.Josephine Preston Peabody was an American poet and dramatist. She was born in New York and educated at the Girls' Latin School, Boston, and at Radcliffe College. (summary from Wikipedia) After Music is taken from An American Anthology, 1787–1900, edited by Edmund Clarence Stedman (1833–1908)
 
Young’s Literal Translation is a translation of the Bible into English, published in 1862. The translation was made by Robert Young, compiler of Young’s Analytical Concordance to the Bible and Concise Critical Comments on the New Testament. Young produced a “Revised Edition” of the translation in 1887. After he died on October 14, 1888, the publisher in 1898 released a new Revised Edition. (Summary from Wikipedia)
 
LibriVox volunteers bring you 26 recordings of Song by Anna Seward. This was the Weekly Poetry project for April 1, 2012.Anna Seward was an English Romantic poet, often called the Swan of Lichfield. Her verses include elegies and sonnets, and she also wrote a poetical novel, Louisa, of which five editions were published. In an era when women had to tread carefully in society's orbit, Seward struck a middle ground. (from Wikipedia)
 
LibriVox volunteers bring you 9 recordings of Cana by James Freeman Clarke, from The World's Best Poetry, edited by Bliss Carman. This was the Weekly Poetry project for November 14th, 2010.Trivia: After hearing the song "John Brown's Body", Clarke suggested that Mrs. Julia Ward Howe write new lyrics; the result was "The Battle Hymn of the Republic". He published but few verses, but at heart was a poet. (summary by Wikipedia)
 
Football fans David Nicholls & Josh Coull, take you through the Football Wikipedia version of six degrees of separation. Each week they will know their starting page, and the final destination, but what happens in between is anyone's guess. We've all got stuck down the Wikipedia rabbit hole before, now you can join us as we take the journey together! Produced by David Nicholls Starring David Nicholls and Josh Coull Twitter @wikiwanderers
 
How often have you watched a historical drama and wondered if it was REALLY telling the truth about the Tudor Court or the American Revolution? You could have looked it up on Wikipedia, but your phone was so far away and there were so many words to read.That’s where we come in! Public history enthusiasts Megan Judt and Laura Skog are setting out to watch every historical film, talking about each of them might tell us about history. Expect spoilers, and also some snark. We’ll also rate each o ...
 
Michel Eyquem de Montaigne is one of the most influential writers of the French Renaissance, known for popularising the essay as a literary genre and is popularly thought of as the father of Modern Skepticism. He became famous for his effortless ability to merge serious intellectual speculation with casual anecdotes and autobiography—and his massive volume Essais (translated literally as "Attempts") contains, to this day, some of the most widely influential essays ever written. (Summary extr ...
 
The story is set in Padua in a distant, but unspecified past. From his quarters, Giovanni, a young student of letters, observes Beatrice, the beautiful daughter of Dr. Rappaccini, a scientist working in isolation. Beatrice is confined to the lush and locked gardens filled with poisonous plants by her father. Having fallen in love, Giovanni enters the garden and meets with Beatrice a number of times regardless of the warning of his mentor, Professor Baglioni, that Rappaccini is up to no good ...
 
Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. He was devised by Scottish author and doctor Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A brilliant London-based detective, Holmes is famous for his prowess at using logic and astute observation to solve cases. He is perhaps the most famous fictional detective, and indeed one of the best known and most universally recognizable literary characters. Join Dr. Watson and Sherlock Holmes, i ...
 
LibriVox volunteers bring you 18 recordings of The Silver Swan by Orlando Gibbons. This was the Weekly Poetry project for August 14, 2011.Orlando Gibbons was an English composer, virginalist and organist of the late Tudor and early Jacobean periods. He was a leading composer in the England of his day. In the 20th century, the Canadian pianist Glenn Gould championed Gibbons's music, and named him as his favorite composer. (summary from Wikipedia)
 
The Princess is a serio-comic blank verse narrative poem, written by Alfred Tennyson, published in 1847. The poem tells the story of an heroic princess who forswears the world of men and founds a women's university where men are forbidden to enter. The prince to whom she was betrothed in infancy enters the university with two friends, disguised as women students. They are discovered and flee, but eventually they fight a battle for the princess's hand. (Summary by Wikipedia)
 
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show series
 
How do Dave and Josh get from a Sky Sports Classic from the noughties to a pure goal scoring machine who, if it wasn't for a volcano, would've signed for Big Sam's Blackburn... Join us for Episode 13 of the Wikipedia Wanderers Podcast where we know the start and the end of our journey but the road we take in between is anyone's guess...…
 
El Salvador's president made Bitcoin legal tender, now he wants to build a city. Joe Tidy speaks to Salvodoran-American cryptocurrency enthusiast and investor Gerson Martinez about the Central American country's experience with Bitcoin since its introduction earlier this year. Plus 193 member states of the UN agency Unesco say they want a more ethi…
 
Happy Thanksgiving from Costume Drama Rewind, where we’re marking the holiday by reviewing the animated classic “The Mouse on the Mayflower.” Did the Pilgrims really get rescued from all their troubles by a mouse in a tiny hat? Probably not, but that’s also not the weirdest or least accurate thing going on with this little movie.…
 
Paul Howe has a novel theory that could help explain the current state of humanity. Adolescence, he says, isn’t so much a time of life as a state of mind – and it’s transforming our adult world. Also, why an emphasis on human rights has failed to reduce global inequality; and redefining minimalism as “intentional living”.…
 
Mithridates or Mithradates VI Eupator (Greek: Μιθραδάτης;[2] 135–63 BC) was ruler of the Hellenistic Kingdom of Pontus in northern Anatolia from 120 to 63 BC, and one of the Roman Republic's most formidable and determined opponents. He was an effective, ambitious and ruthless ruler who sought to dominate Asia Minor and the Black Sea region, waging …
 
In this week's episode, Rae and Charlotte talk about the trans violence epidemic that is plaguing the USA. They talk about each individual case that has happened so far in 2021, how this is the deadliest year for trans Americans, and issues within the LGBTQIA+ community. NOTE: Since the recording of this episode, three more trans Americans have bee…
 
🕑 2 hours 2 minutes After 100 episodes, it's finally my turn to be on the show! I (Yaron) am a MediaWiki - and more specifically "Enterprise MediaWiki" - developer, consultant, author, evangelist and of course podcaster. My interviewer, Ike Hecht, is a fellow MediaWiki consultant and developer who was himself on episode 79. Links for some of the to…
 
Wendy (IG: @wcooperkelly) is a lifelong Memphian and has been an architect with LRK (IG: @lrk_inc) since 2011. She has worked on several local projects including The Renasant Convention Center, The Commonwealth, FedExFamily House Phase II, and Tennessee Brewery. In her spare time, she renovates her MCM ranch with husband Chris. They have 3 fur babi…
 
These pop singers thought they were going to be the first band in space. What happened? Support the show and listen to over 50 episodes of our bonus podcast by joining our Patreon! Show notes: 02:50 – NASA on mission to planet pop (New Scientist) 04:57 – Put Your Arms Around Me (Natural/YouTube) 06:32 – I Love the USA (Weezer/YouTube) 11:45 – Steve…
 
How hackers stole millions from companies around the world, and why they're so difficult to stop. Chris Fox speaks to Jen Ellis from cybersecurity firm Rapid7 and to Tom Pace from NetRise about the growth in ransomware attacks in recent years, and why companies often feel they have no choice but to pay large ransoms. And Joe Tidy travels to Russia …
 
The Australasian Antarctic Expedition was a 1911–1914 expedition headed by Douglas Mawson that explored the largely uncharted Antarctic coast due south of Australia. Mawson had been inspired to lead his own venture by his experiences on Ernest Shackleton's Nimrod expedition in 1907–1909. During its time in Antarctica, the expedition's sledging part…
 
In this week's episode, Charlotte brings us the crimes committed by Scottish serial killer, Dennis Nilsen. Charlotte and Rae discuss one of the UK's most infamous serial killers who is often referred to as the UK's Jeffery Dahmer. Buckle up! TW: Listener discretion is advised. SOURCES: Wikipedia Esquire Magazine Murderpedia DES Memories of a Murder…
 
Daniel Gallucci (IG: @nurogaffer), Co-Founder and Chief Innovation Officer of Nurosene, is a trained functional neurologist, osteopath, exercise physiologist, and exercise scientist, with experience working in-clinic with top athletes. Daniel has completed fellowships in Traumatic Brain Injury, Vestibular Dysfunction and Rehabilitation, Development…
 
How do Dave and Josh get from a Champions League and FA Cup winning striker, who only retired last year aged 39 to the stadium that gave Arsene Wenger the toughest years of his life..... Join us for Episode 12 of the Wikipedia Wanderers Podcast where we know the start and the end of our journey but the road we take in between is anyone's guess...…
 
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