show episodes
 
Every weekday, host Kai Ryssdal helps you make sense of the day’s business and economic news — no econ degree or finance background required. “Marketplace” takes you beyond the numbers, bringing you context. Our team of reporters all over the world speak with CEOs, policymakers and regular people just trying to get by.
 
The mission of AIPIS is to properly educate real estate specialists and investors in the proven methods of income property investments as a road to building wealth. AIPIS Education Program Jason Hartman, internationally known investment property guru, had a vision. He wanted to share his 25+ years of real estate experience with a wider audience, so that they could benefit from everything he had learned. The idea for the Accredited Income Property Investment Specialist program grew out of Jas ...
 
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show series
 
Progressive Democrats are pushing President Joe Biden to appoint a Federal Reserve chair who will be more proactive about climate change than Jerome Powell. Before the Fed could act more rigorously, however, Congress would need to direct it to. Claudia Sahm, a former Federal Reserve economist, joins us to discuss. Plus: The Weekly Wrap, some backgr…
 
Competition for homebuyers is finally easing up a bit. There are more new listings, houses are staying on the market longer and there are fewer bidding wars. Though buyers may revel in a return to seasonal expectations for the housing market, real estate experts still think a return to “normal” may be a ways off. Later in the show, we’ll look also …
 
The Treasury Department decided not to mince words about the state of child care in the U.S. in a new report, calling it “unworkable” and in a state of market failure. As the Biden administration continues to push for investment in human infrastructure and the care economy, the report makes the case for universal preschool and extended tax credits …
 
The U.S. Census Bureau released poverty rates for 2020 today. While the official poverty rate went up slightly, the supplemental poverty rate — which experts say gives a more accurate picture — went down to its lowest in census measurement because of expanded pandemic relief for millions. But with many of those government programs expired or ending…
 
Indoor dining is closed in some places, restaurants are requesting federal aid and, for many businesses, fall 2021 is already looking a lot like fall 2020. On today’s show, we’ll look at where things stand. Plus: GDP growth, retail spending in China and the history behind power grid problems in Texas.…
 
It’s been 20 years Saturday since the Sept. 11 attacks on New York, Washington and the crash of United Airlines Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. It was the first of many, many “uncertainty shocks” this country and this economy have seen. On today’s show, we’ll take some time to reflect on that legacy. But first, we’ll get the view on the gro…
 
First-time jobless claims dropped to their lowest point since March of last year. But with many industries still seeing labor shortages, what do the numbers really say about the state of the economic recovery? And how can we build back a more equitable labor market, closing racial unemployment gaps? That’s where we’re starting off on today’s show. …
 
Starting next week, New York City will begin enforcing a requirement of at least one COVID-19 vaccine shot for entrance to businesses like restaurants, bars, museums, theaters and gyms. That’s easier said than done, however, as customers struggle to navigate apps and business owners attempt to verify vaccine statuses and enforce the mandate. Plus: …
 
Traveling nurses have always earned more than their full-time counterparts at hospitals. With high demand for nurses in intensive care units, especially in the undervaccinated South, traveling nurses can now earn more than $10,000 per week. Eyeing the higher pay, some regularly employed nurses are leaving their jobs to travel — which further exacer…
 
Though the unemployment rate dipped in August, it rose for a single racial or ethnic group: Black workers. Job growth has been slow to rebound in industries like child care and leisure and hospitality — all of which are major employers of Black women. The employment rate for Black workers is trending in the wrong direction as the federal unemployme…
 
“There was a lot of gasping going on,” was how Heather Long of The Washington Post described the reception this morning to August’s disappointing, very-big-miss jobs report. Given that the delta variant is still very much at large, have economists and labor market analysts been too optimistic about job creation? Also on today’s show: the costly ste…
 
The devastation inflicted on parts of the East Coast by the remnants of Hurricane Ida tells us that climate change is well and truly here — and that much of America’s housing stock is nowhere near up to weathering its effects. Also on today’s show: In the aftermath of OnlyFans’ reversal of its decision to ban sexually explicit content, sex workers …
 
In anticipation of the holiday season, Walmart plans to hire 20,000 distribution and fulfillment center workers. Getting to that number might be a long shot. According to a recent survey of major retailers by the consulting firm Korn Ferry, 97% said they were having “moderate” or “significant” challenges hiring such workers. Also on today’s show: C…
 
Today we received record-shattering house price numbers. Although major metro housing market conditions right now are sharply reminiscent of the bubble of 2005, economists consider this a very different category of boom. Also on today’s show, how Louisianans without power or water are surviving in the late-summer heat, a stark report on racial and …
 
Although about a million people in Louisiana are without power due to the destruction caused by Hurricane Ida, the investment of billions of dollars in a robust levee system means things are a lot better than they would have been. It’s a real-life examination of return on infrastructure investment. Also: Economist Mohamed A. El-Erian on why he — st…
 
The Supreme Court blocked the Biden administration’s most recent eviction moratorium yesterday. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had extended the ban to buy more time for state and local governments to distribute aid to tenants and landlords. Though some 8 million adults in America are behind on rent, the Treasury Department said that…
 
A new report from The Century Foundation shows that the manufacturing sector will need 2 million new workers over the coming decade, as the predominately white, predominately male workforce ages into retirement. But manufacturers are struggling to recruit younger employees — and to correct racial and gender divides. Also on the program: the conveni…
 
On Wednesday, the White House held a cybersecurity summit with leaders in tech, finance and energy, calling for private industries to help bolster cyber defenses. The Commerce Department estimates that there are roughly 500,000 unfilled cybersecurity jobs across the country, and that number will continue to grow — and increasingly pose a threat — u…
 
The theme for this year’s Federal Reserve Jackson Hole Symposium is “Macroeconomic Policy in an Uneven Economy.” Wrapped up in that title is a long-running debate over the extent to which the Fed can and should play an active role in closing racial disparity in wealth, wages and unemployment rates. And later: what’s behind Walmart’s new delivery se…
 
On Monday, the Food and Drug Administration granted full approval to the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for Americans 16 and older. With the first COVID-19 vaccine graduating from emergency use authorization, more companies may join the growing cohort that requires worker vaccinations, but the labor shortage may deter some employers from adopting such man…
 
The Joe Biden administration authorized an extra $500 million for Special Immigrant Visas and other programs for those fleeing Taliban-controlled Afghanistan. On today’s show, we’ll look at what happens to refugees once they arrive stateside and the organizations trying to secure housing for them. Plus: Toys R Us is back from the dead, what copper …
 
The pandemic has been incredibly difficult for industries like food service, hospitality and travel. But some fields have blossomed. Among them: remote-work consulting. With COVID cases surging in the U.S. and remote work looking like it could be here to stay for many white-collar workers, companies that provide personality quizzes, feng shui consu…
 
A swipe of the credit card and a quickly scribbled signature is a familiar gesture for many American shoppers. But Mastercard recently announced that it will phase out magnetic stripes by 2033 in favor of chips and touchless taps. Though other countries have more quickly adopted credit card technology, in the United States, back-end processing, cos…
 
Hospital workers may be having a painful case of déjà vu. A growing number of hospitals across the country are running out of intensive care unit beds, dealing with staffing shortages and struggling with retention amid worker burnout. This is prolonging wait times for emergency room visits and ambulances and — in some cases — causing delays of none…
 
Following the withdrawal of U.S. troops, Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan, fell to the Taliban on Sunday. On today’s program, we take a look at the economic facets of that story, including how the Taliban is funded, how military contractors made billions in the nearly 20-year war and how humanitarian aid is responding. Plus: a crackdown on the tut…
 
The University of Michigan released its consumer sentiment survey on Friday, and, from the consumer’s point of view, things look bleak. Sentiment dipped 13.5% in early August to a reading below its April 2020 level. Economists say the decline has to do with inflation, unemployment and surging COVID cases and that vaccinated people are feeling more …
 
The U.S. Census Bureau released numbers today many have been waiting for to draw the borders of congressional districts. Political groups are already geared up for the fight, and many have been spending money trying to shape state legislatures and educate voters about the data. Also on today’s program, we’ll dig into the president’s appeal to OPEC,…
 
Back-to-school supply drives are a staple of late summer. This year, however, those events are seeing two key impacts from the pandemic: an uptick in demand for donated items and an increase in those donations from retailers looking to get rid of unsold inventory. One nonprofit has seen seven times the typical volume of donations so far in 2021. Pl…
 
After the passing of the bipartisan infrastructure bill today, Senate Democrats are eyeing their next political battle: a $3.5 trillion dollar spending proposal that includes a big expansion of safety net programs, including federally funded universal prekindergarten. Despite a hefty price tag, locally funded preschool programs have shown positive …
 
A report released by the U.N. Monday sent a stark warning about how advanced the climate crisis is — and outlined where the world is going without urgent and dramatic reforms. In the U.S., transportation is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions. While the latest infrastructure bill would invest $39 billion in public transit, experts say it…
 
Though many early and mid-career workers have enjoyed the work-from-home model, the same can’t be said for all managers. Research shows that those who work at the office are more likely to be promoted. This out-of-sight, out-of-mind mentality when it comes to promotions can further inhibit career climbing for parents, women and people color. But fi…
 
President Joe Biden signed an executive order Thursday calling for half of new cars sold in the U.S. to be electric by 2030. It’s a lofty goal, given that EVs make up 2% to 3% of all cars on the road. Though carmakers seem to be on board, a lot of necessary infrastructure, like charging stations, would need to be built first. Also on today’s show: …
 
When searching for economic indicators, some economists look to rail traffic. Intermodal train traffic, when products travel in containers from ships or trucks onto trains, is doing especially well this year as consumers demand imported goods. But congestion in U.S. ports and surges in COVID-19 could cut freight rail traffic — and complicate econom…
 
PepsiCo is preparing to sell Tropicana and other juices to a private equity firm for $3.3 billion. Molson Coors is going to phase out 11 of its “economy” brands. Increasingly, beverage companies are looking for the next trendy drink of choice — which means ditching investments in sugary drinks and frat party favorites in favor of seltzer, kombucha …
 
The $1 trillion Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, if passed, could create anywhere from 650,000 to 1 million new jobs, economists predict. Though the bill has substantial bipartisan support, the U.S. labor force is short on construction workers, and the government may have to invest in citizen training or issue more visas for temporary, forei…
 
The 2020s could well define the future of liberty for American citizens forever. Robert Barnes, founder of Barnes Law and attorney for George Gammon as they FOIA the Fed in an effort to ensure they haven't overstepped their bounds continually since their inception. Jason Hartman and Robert discuss the case, why it's important, and why this is just …
 
With infections by the delta coronavirus on the rise, companies including Google, Lyft, Indeed and Apple are delaying their back-to-the-office plans. That worries commercial real estate pros and businesses that depend on office workers. Also on today’s show: consumer sensitivity to price hikes, long lines in Cape Cod and how chaos in the shipping b…
 
Prices are high, inventory is low — if you’re in the market for a new home, you know this has been the reality for a while now. Something else to add to house hunters’ chagrin? According to the research firm Zonda, 85% of homebuilders are purposely building fewer houses, given shortages of land, materials and workers. But first: the year of lost GD…
 
More than 15 million people live in households that are behind on their rent, according to a new report from the Aspen Institute. And while Congress allocated $46 billion in federal assistance for renters during the pandemic, access to technology, language barriers and lack of information are proving to be hurdles for tenants behind on their rents.…
 
Sallie Krawcheck, CEO and co-founder of Ellevest, a digital financial company for women, discusses how COVID-19 exacerbated existing inequities between men and women. She also talks about why money causes stress and the future of her company. Also on today’s show: the continuing struggles of the travel industry, shifting language in home appraisals…
 
Towns like Augusta, Maine; Bemidji, Minnesota; and Savannah, Georgia, are among the more than 40 communities in the U.S. incentivizing people to move there. They dangle perks like housing assistance, camping equipment or up to $20,000 in cash. The incentives are aimed at convincing remote workers to make a move, which can boost the economies of str…
 
Over 60,000 businesses reopened during the second quarter, which is the highest volume of reopenings in the last year, according to data from Yelp. But there’s a distinct correlation between consumer interest and vaccination rates, meaning more Yelp searches, pictures and reviews for places like Maine, Vermont, Connecticut and New York than Arizona…
 
Real estate investing has worked throughout history. It works incredibly well in the markets Jason Hartman recommends. But there's one thing that could derail it (and everything else for that matter), and it's a worldwide phenomenon. Jason explains what's going on with the population of the world, and why it's a trend worth worrying about. Key Take…
 
Though it may not be instantaneous, China-based online clothing brand Shein makes it pretty darn close. They’ve cut the clothing design and production process down to as little as a few days. In today’s show, we talk about one of the fastest-growing e-commerce companies in the world revolutionizing fashion and apparel. But first: rental bidding war…
 
Red news booths used to dot Shanghai’s cityscape. Now, finding a newspaper in China’s financial capital is a difficult task. Newspaper circulation in China dropped by 37% between 2010 and 2019, according to government statistics. So, what does that mean for the few remaining newsstands that some say have outlived their use? Also on the show today: …
 
The recent pandemic-induced recession only lasted only two months and ended in April 2020, according to the National Bureau of Economic Research’s Business Cycle Dating Committee. On today’s show, we’ll dig into why that is and why it feels like the recession is far from over for some Americans. Then, how manufacturers and retailers sneakily hide t…
 
The number of 16- to 19-year-olds who work jumped to nearly 32% in June, meaning teens are helping ease the economy’s worker shortage. On today’s show, we’ll hear from two teenagers about what they’re doing to earn money. Plus, the European Union’s controversial carbon tariff, the red-hot homebuilding market and the Biden administration plays a cyb…
 
There's a shortage of everything going on in the world today. And even when some things are available, another part of the supply chain is clogged and we can't get the parts we need. Nowhere is this truer than the construction industry. Jason Hartman is joined by Venveo's Zach and Beth to discuss what's actually happening with the supply chain and …
 
U.S. Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo covered a variety of topics in today’s interview, which is the first half of our show today. Plus: Foreclosures, stadium litter and the state of the Chinese economy. Later, we check in with the post-Brexit European Union. Is Brussels trying to punish British film and TV?…
 
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