Courtney Cania public
[search 0]

Download the App!

show episodes
 
All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Ailsa Chang , Audie Cornish , Mary Louise Kelly , and Ari Shapiro . In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, which is hosted by Michel Martin. Every weekday, local host, Peter Biello, and national hosts present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, int ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
For some, m aple sugaring is a perennial ritual, painstakingly completed as we usher out the bitter wisps of winter, and embrace balmier, brighter days of early spring. And whether you’re producing maple syrup with just a few buckets, or if you’ve expanded operations with a full-blown sugar shack … you know this much to be true: 1) S ugaring is an …
 
More than a year into the coronavirus pandemic, doctors and researchers are still trying to learn more about patients who have become known as "long haulers" for continuing to experience health effects long after first showing symptoms. All Things Considered host Peter Biello spoke with Dr. Jeffrey Parsonnet, an infectious disease physician at Dart…
 
A bill in the New Hampshire House has prompted heated debate over how systemic racism is discussed in the state's public schools. House Bill 544 would prohibit teaching about so-called divisive concepts such as racism and sexism in public schools and other state funded programs. And so far, much of the conversation has hinged on critical race theor…
 
Here at Something Wild , we don’t have a problem with winter. Aside from the snow and the cold and the freezing rain…okay, maybe we have a couple issues. But we have sweaters and hot cocoa and Netflix. Trees, however, do not. As the snow piles up, you may see trees bent over with their crowns nearly touching the ground, leafless and haggard. They c…
 
Sometimes called a Marsh Hawk, the northern harrier is currently one the rarest birds of prey nesting in the Granite State. Unlike many of our more common hawks, harriers shun the forest, opting instead to hunt in wide-open spaces like fields, brushy areas -- even in marshes. And get this --they build their nests on the ground . Peculiar preference…
 
As we approach the end of a tumultuous year, NHPR is checking in with some of the people we spoke with early on in the pandemic, to see how things have changed. It’s part of a series we’re calling Hindsight . Earlier this year, as part of our series Lifelines , we reported on a group of inmates at the New Hampshire State Prison for Women in Concord…
 
As we approach the end of a tumultuous year, NHPR is checking in with people we spoke to early on in the pandemic to see how things have changed. It’s part of a series we’re calling “Hindsight.” Earlier this year, some doctors feared rural areas would be overwhelmed with too many COVID-19 patients and too few resources. In June, we reported on a st…
 
This time of year, you're likely to see cars and pickup trucks heading home on the highways with fresh-cut Christmas trees tied to roofs or in the truck beds. Fraser firs, Korean firs, Balsam firs, and Spruce (ouch!)... So today on Something Wild we take a look at Christmas tree farms, and the important habitats they provide for New Hampshire wildl…
 
As we hunker down for the winter weather, we’re frequently too preoccupied with what is in our front yards that we tend not to notice what isn’t there. And short of finding a postcard in your mailbox from a warm exotic location, signed by your friendly neighborhood phoebe, you probably haven’t thought much about the birds that flitted through your …
 
New Hampshire hospitals and health care facilities have long struggled to recruit and retain workers, especially licensed nursing assistants. Recent data from the New Hampshire Board of Nursing shows the COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated the shortage of health care workers in the state.By equirk@nhpr.org (Emily Quirk)
 
By the time the cold weather months hit us, three of New Hampshire’s eight species of bats have already migrated to warmer places in the South and Mid-Atlantic regions. The bat that DO overwinter in New Hampshire have relocated out of their preferred summer roosts in trees (and Dave's chimney), and into winter hibernacula like caves, mine shafts, a…
 
A new poll from Suffolk University and The Boston Globe shows a substantial number of New Hampshire voters splitting their ticket with strong support for Democrat Joe Biden for president, Democrat Jeanne Shaheen for Senate and Republican Governor Chris Sununu. For a closer look at the way voters feel with just 20 days until Election Day, All Things…
 
The oppression of Black Americans has always been, to a certain extent, physical. Slavery, segregation and police violence represent just a few of the ways society has regulated Black bodies to maintain white dominance. This weekend at the Black New England Conference, panelists will gather for a discussion on how women's resistance to this kind of…
 
This episode of Something Wild was produced by Andrew Parrella: The number of acorns a tree produces in a given year has to do with masting. Not mast like on tall ships, but mast as in masticate, or to chew and it refers to the fruit, seeds or nuts that trees produce and are in turn fodder for animals. Especially in New Hampshire, oak mast follows …
 
This week, The Office of the Special Council has announced an investigation into Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos for violating the Hatch Act. This is not the first time a member of the Trump administration has faced such an accusation, the OSC found former White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway guilty of repeated violations. But what is the Hatc…
 
The New Hampshire Highland Games and Festival, like so many other events this year, is going virtual. Usually filled with music, shopping and games such as the caber toss, the festival kicked off Thursday with a virtual musical performance. It runs through Sunday. For more on how the festival is making the transition to the virtual world, we turn t…
 
The 2020 presidential election has many of us reflecting back to election night, November 2016, when the man who was elected president did not receive the majority of the popular vote. And that's not the first time that's happened! The reason? The Electoral College, which has been part of the presidential election process since the beginning of our…
 
Along with regular updates about the COVID-19 pandemic, the city manager of Portsmouth has included something you don't normally find in government newsbriefs: poetry. Portsmouth Poet Laureate Tammi Truax has been reflecting on the pandemic in verse every week since the beginning of April. She spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello.…
 
It's late August, and the leaves are already starting to change. And that flush of red you’re seeing likely comes from the red maple , also known as “swamp” or “soft maple”. It's an adaptable tree renowned for signaling an impending autumn, and has even earned the dubious nickname: “Judas Tree” – for betraying these late summer days. Red maples are…
 
This Something Wild segment was produced by the amazing Andrew Parrella. You may be familiar with hoarders (not the TV show, but same idea). In nature, a hoarder will hide food in one place. Everything it gathers will be stored in a single tree or den. But for some animals one food cache isn't enough. We call them scatter hoarders. A "scatter hoard…
 
We know…we’ve been remiss, and it’s time to talk about the elephant in the room. Something Wild, as you know, is a chance to take a closer look at the wildlife, ecosystems and marvelous phenomena you can find in and around New Hampshire. But over the years there is one species in New Hampshire that we haven’t spent much time examining. A species, I…
 
Governor Chris Sununu’s guidelines for reopening New Hampshire’s schools leave many decisions up to local school boards - many are looking at a hybrid model, a mix of in-person and remote learning. But as districts work to solidify these plans, vocational and technical education schools are already experimenting with how to offer students hands-on …
 
By Degrees is a new climate change reporting project by NHPR. One major focus of the project is the connection between pollution and our health. Last week, we talked about outdoor air quality in New Hampshire. But scientists are exploring the ways indoor air quality affects us too.By pbiello@nhpr.org (Peter Biello)
 
Gov. Chris Sununu has signed a bill that aims to support sexual assault survivors at colleges and universities. John Gabrieli is the director of the Every Voice Coalition, a student and survivor-led organization that wrote the language in the bill. Sophia Miller is a Dartmouth student organizer who helped bring the Coalition’s work to New Hampshire…
 
Demonstrators filled several blocks in Concord on Saturday as they marched to the State House to peacefully support Black Lives Matter. The event was organized by local students, who spoke to protesters from the steps of the State House. NHPR's All Things Considered host Peter Biello interviewed Samuel Alicea, a student leader at Saturday's march.…
 
Saturday's protests in Manchester drew as many as a thousand people. Black Lives Matter of Manchester helped organize the peaceful demonstration, which gathered in Veterans Park. NHPR's All Things Considered host Peter Biello interviewed Ronelle Tshiela, a local organizer who spoke Saturday in New Hampshire's largest city.…
 
The coronavirus pandemic has prompted concerns about health—and not just physical health. Financial health is also a major concern for many NHPR listeners. Subscribe to our COVID-19 newsletter for the latest updates from NHPR. Dozens have told NHPR through our ongoing survey that the stock market slide that began in March has taken a huge bite out …
 
The past couple of weeks have been weird. Daily life changed gradually, then all at once. We now find ourselves at home practicing our best “social distancing” protocols. Incredible technology allows us to stay connected, and that’s fantastic. But it’s ok to put the phone down. It’s ok to turn down the news from time to time, and take a long walk o…
 
When we think about the kinds of people making important contributions to science, we might imagine someone in a white lab coat, squinting into a microscope, or pouring over reams of computer data. Truth is, good science can also be accomplished by everyday people-- citizen scientists-- volunteering in both large and small collaborations. National …
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login