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Best Dr Matthew Holmes podcasts we could find (updated May 2020)
Best Dr Matthew Holmes podcasts we could find
Updated May 2020
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Serial killers. Gangsters. Gunslingers. Victorian-era murderers. And that's just the tip of the iceberg. Each week, the Most Notorious podcast features true-life tales of crime, criminals, tragedies and disasters throughout history. Host Erik Rivenes interviews authors and historians who have studied their subjects for years, and the stories are offered with unique insight, detail, and historical accuracy.
 
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Ep 289 - Hotline for First Responders Guest: Dr Allan Holmes First Responders are the people rushing into a crisis when the rest of us are rushing away. They are there when criminals break the law, when a building is on fire, when someone has been hurt or is extremely ill or someone has fallen ill due to a pandemic. COVID 19 not only compromises he…
 
On November 5th, 1934, in the small coal mining town of Kelayres, Pennsylvania, Republican political boss Joe Bruno took an extreme and shocking step. Worried and agitated about a possible loss in the following day's elections, he and his family used his large weapons arsenal to fire into a Democratic parade. My guest, Stephanie Hoover, author of "…
 
As political factions battled in pre-Civil War Washington D.C., a sensational sex and murder scandal suddenly grabbed the nation's attention. New York Congressman Daniel Sickles, having learned that his wife Teresa was in the midst of a torrid love affair with U.S. Attorney Philip Barton Key II, angrily confronted him in a park with fatal consequen…
 
In the years following World War One, thousands of young women were hired to paint radium on watch and clock dials so they would glow in the dark. As a result, many of the women would suffer the excruciating effects of radiation poisoning, which often lead to their deaths at an early age. My guest, Kate Moore, is author of the New York Times bestse…
 
Ep 288 - Your Pharmacist and Covid19 Guest: Annette Robinson - Derek Desrosiers Are pharmacists an underutilized health care resource in the fight against the Coronavirus? “Pharmacists are the most accessible health care professionals in BC,” says Annette Robinson, the Vice-President of the Pharmacy Association. “One reason pharmacists may be overl…
 
Ep 287 - The Right to Be Cold Guest: Sheila Watt-Cloutier On February 18th, SFU’s Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue presented Sheila Watt-Cloutier with the Jack P. Blaney Award for Dialogue in recognition of her outstanding global leadership using dialogue in her work as an advocate for indigenous, environmental and cultural rights. Shauna Sylvest…
 
In early 19th century Australia, escaping from a penal colony was not an easy task, mostly because there was no where to go. Six foot five William Buckley did just that, however, wandering though the wild Australian bush before being taken in by a tribe of aborigines, close to death. For the next thirty-two years he would live with the tribe, befor…
 
Ep 286 - Mission Possible Guest: Matthew Smedley Do companies have a responsibility to provide employment for the disenfranchised? Matthew Smedley says, “Yes, they do and doing so is good business!” He goes on to say, “Society, not the economy, is the real marketplace. And smart companies realize that looking after people – all people, including th…
 
Ep 285 Thank you Canada - A Syrian Refugee’s story Guests: Nour Suliman Imagine, if you can, that for three of your 14 or 15 years of life you have been on the move in your homeland – staying one step ahead of the guns, the bullets and the bombs that are devastating you, your family and your community. You and 16 of your family squeeze into a car s…
 
Ep 284 CO2 and your brain Guests: Dr David Smith A woodpecker slams its head into a hard object about 80 million times in its lifetime and doesn’t suffer from traumatic brain injury. Why? That was the question that was posed at a DARPA (or Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) event a number of years ago. Those in attendance laughed at the que…
 
Leavenworth Penitentiary in Kansas was once home to some of the most notorious criminals in America, including Carl Panzram, Robert "the Birdman" Stroud, Frank Nitti and George "Machine Gun" Kelly. Part of its history includes one of the most exciting prison breaks in U.S. history, when the "Leavenworth Seven" kidnapped Warden Tom White in December…
 
Calamity Jane is without question one of the most iconic figures in Old West history. She's been portrayed innumerable times in film and television, most recently in the HBO series Deadwood as Wild Bill Hickock's loyal buckskin-wearing friend and sidekick. Her reputation proceeded her wherever she went, as a master bullwhacker, an excessive drinker…
 
Black Death. Typhoid fever. Pellagra. In the early 1900s they invaded the United States, killing thousands. One of the most notorious historical figures associated with disease was "Typhoid Mary", who unknowingly infected untold numbers of people with typhoid fever while cooking in kitchens along the east coast. My guest, Gail Jarrow, is the author…
 
Just over a hundred years ago, the world suffered through a brutal influenza pandemic, which infected up to a quarter of the world's population. It was nicknamed the Spanish Flu, and killed millions of people. My guest, John Barry, is an historian, adjunct faculty at Tulane University, and author of the New York Times bestseller "The Great Influenz…
 
While the Coen brothers refuse to confirm it, many believe that their movie "Fargo" was inspired by the Carol Thompson murder case. She was viciously killed in her comfortable Saint Paul home by a hitman hired by her eccentric husband, T. Eugene Thompson, in March of 1963, leaving behind four small children. It was an absolutely sensational case, o…
 
Some of the most notorious cases in American history were solved by the masterful techniques of forensics expert Dr. Edward Oscar Heinrich. He was known as the "American Sherlock Holmes" for his use of science and deduction to solve what many considered unsolvable cases, including Oregon's infamous 1923 Siskiyou "train robbery"/multi-murder, and Sa…
 
In late October of 1928, authorities in the small town of Lake Bluff, Illinois discovered a grisly scene in the village hall basement. They found a young woman named Elfreida Knaak, naked, horribly burned and barely clinging to life, next to a furnace. From that point on, investigators would uncover a bizarre story, including a secret affair, mysti…
 
On March 6th, 1873, a brutal double ax murder took the lives of two Norwegian women living on the isolated Smuttynose Island, one of the Isles of Shoals off the coast of Maine and New Hampshire. My guest is J. Dennis Robinson, a prolific writer, historian and steward of Smuttynose Island, and author of "Mystery on the Isles of Shoals: Closing the C…
 
David Grann, author of the New York Times Bestselling "Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI", is my guest on this week's episode of Most Notorious. He talks about his research into a spree of murders of oil-rich Osage Indians in 1920s Oklahoma. Dozens and dozens of people were being murdered in a crime wave that be…
 
In the summer of 1937, in an idyllic neighborhood of Los Angeles called Inglewood, the unspeakable happened. Three little girls were lured from a park, assaulted and murdered. The sensational case, known as the "Babes of Inglewood" Murders, would shake Depression-era America. My guest, Pamela Everett, is not only an attorney with the InnocenceProje…
 
Alvin "Creepy" Karpis could claim many things in his life. He was not only the brains behind the Barker-Karpis Gang, but the last public enemy of the 1930s, one of J. Edgar Hoover's most hated adversaries, and the longest serving inmate in Alcatraz history. Julie Thompson, author of "The Hunt for the Last Public Enemy in Northeastern Ohio: Alvin "C…
 
In this episode, we examine the most notorious witch hunt in American history, in Salem, Massachusetts. Hundreds of women and men were accused of witchcraft by young, "afflicted" girls, and many were executed. My guest is Mary Beth Norton, award-winning historian and professor of American history at Cornell University. She joins me to talk about he…
 
In early 1946, a serial killer nicknamed "The Phantom Killer" (aka the "Moonlight Killer") terrorized the citizens of Texarkana (Arkansas and Texas). It was most sensational series of murders in post-war America. Dr. James Presley is my guest, and the author of "The Phantom Killer - Unlocking the Mystery of the Texarkana Serial Murders: The Story o…
 
Most of us are probably familiar with the Kingston Trio song, "Tom Dooley", but fewer may realize that it was based on the true life murder of Laura Foster in 1866 North Carolina. Charlotte Corbin Barnes is an unapologetic supporter of Tom Dooley's innocence, and explains the crime, the complications of the trial due to the intense political climat…
 
In October 1922, a sensational murder gripped the city of London. While on a walk home after a show, Percy Thompson was stabbed by Freddy Bywaters, the lover of his wife, Edith. Passionate love letters written by her, including mentions of the desire to murder Percy, helped send not only Bywaters to the gallows, but her as well. My guest is bestsel…
 
In March of 1892, a private detective named Charles Gardner was hired by the Reverend Doctor Charles Parkhurst, moral crusader and social reformer, as an escort through the seediest, vilest slums in New York City. The purpose of this slumming tour was so that Dr. Parkhurst could gather evidence to present to a grand jury to aid in their investigati…
 
Ep 273 - First Responder PTSD Guest: Bob Rich The average person experiences about four events in their lives that could trigger PTSD. The average career cop encounters between 100 and 400 incidents that could trigger PTSD. Retired Abbotsford Police Chief Bob Rich knows this all too well. In early 2015 Chief Rich lost two active members of the poli…
 
True Crime Tripper is the second of three new shows I'm trying out on Most Notorious. If launched in 2020, it would be a travel show that focused on historic sites, hotels, restaurants and museums related to true crime history. In this first pilot episode I chat with Sue Vickery, tour guide at the Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast Museum in Fall River,…
 
In this first trial episode of "Aghast at the Past", a possible new weekly addition to Most Notorious, I narrate true crime stories I've culled from North American newspapers dated December 17th, 1901. They include the murder of a young woman by a burglar in Pittsburgh, a bar fight gone wrong in Sioux City, Iowa, and a mysterious man nicknamed "Jac…
 
Ep 272 - Looming Industrial Lands Crisis Guest: Eric Aderneck Vancouver has a problem! Hemmed in by water, mountains, agricultural land, the border and the Port of Vancouver, industrial land is severely squeezed. Virtually no one is paying attention because industrial employment land isn’t sexy. It doesn’t capture headlines nor votes, and it’s comp…
 
On the evening of November 17th, 1973, five teenagers, enjoying a campfire at the Gitchie-Manitou State Park in Iowa, were terrorized by three sociopathic brothers, who would end up murdering the four boys in brutal fashion. The lone survivor, Sandra Cheskey, was raped and released, and not surprisingly deeply traumatized by what she'd witnessed an…
 
Ep 271 Guest: Dr Dugald Seely The important role of Complementary and Alternative medicine In 2017, Dr Dugald Seely was awarded the Dr Rogers Prize for contributions to complementary and alternative health in Canada. It is a unique Canadian prize that acknowledges the role of CAMs and it supports research with the awarding of a $250,000 prize. What…
 
William Happer A Carbon Draught? Four years ago, I went to Princeton University to interview Professor William Happer. When I interviewed him, I was aware that he was a CO2 (and its impact on climate) contrarian. Mr. Happer points out carbon dioxide is an important trace gas and an integral part of the carbon cycle, a bio-geo-chemical cycle in whic…
 
Ep 270 Guest: Dr Rosalin Miles Rainforest Trail Run - a powerful antioxidant Chief Dan George talked of “the beauty of the trees, the softness of the air, the fragrance of the grass, they speak to me… the trail of the sun and the life that never goes away, they speak to me. And my heart soars.” The forest, according to Peter Wohleben, is a social n…
 
Ep 13 Brigitte Raye Restauranteur Extraordinaire The statistics suck. Small independent restaurants have a survival rate that is so poor you can’t help but wonder how do any of them survive? Food costs are soaring, rental costs, taxes, wages are all pointing upward. How can anyone survive? As someone who appreciates the unique dining experiences th…
 
Ep 268 Guest: Dr Claire Fraser You Are Not Alone Your body has been colonized by bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses and microbes. There are so many of them that you amount for about half of you and the other half are all of the other bits of organic life that like to call you home. They are known as the microbiome and they possess 200 times more ge…
 
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