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Best gladstone s library podcasts we could find (Updated October 2019)
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The digital archive of Gladstone's Library, a residential library and meeting place dedicated to dialogue, debate and learning for open-minded individuals.
 
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Poet Suzannah Evans reads from her 2018 poetry collection Near Future and discusses her writing experiences. Set in an all-too-imaginable Earth where resources are insufficient for human existence and asteroid storms threaten the solar system, Suzannah’s poems ask us to think about what we would do if we were there: if we had to go to work meet ...…
 
We’re delighted to welcome Damian back to Gladfest – he was the very first event of our very first festival! You Will Be Safe Here is Damian’s first novel. Set in South Africa in 1901, at the height of the Boer War, Sarah van der Watt and her son are taken from their farm by force to Bloaemfontein Concentration Camp – where the English promise ...…
 
Mountaineering literature is a traditionally male-dominated genre. Stephen Harper’s best-selling Ladykiller Peak (1965) claimed that mountaineering by ‘the weaker sex’ was a form of ‘women’s rebellion against man’s natural assumption of command’. Nevertheless, women have succeeded in summitting, climbing, and exploring some of the most remote, ...…
 
The tale of how the hero Theseus killed the Minotaur, finding his way out of the labyrinth using Ariadne’s ball of red thread, is one of the most intriguing, suggestive and persistent of all myths, and the labyrinth – the beautiful, confounding and terrifying building created for the half-man, half-bull monster – is one of the foundational symb ...…
 
Emily Brontë: misanthropic, enigmatic, awkward. But was she? Is Heathcliff’s creator really what we think we know of her? In this biography with a twist, Claire O’Callaghan conjures up a new portrait of one of the English canon’s most well-known figures. Claire discusses Emily’s feminism, her passion for the natural world – and the ‘fake news’ ...…
 
In a time of upheaval and division – political, cultural, religious – what can be done to find a common ground? Join Pádraig Ó Tuama (leader of Corrymeela, Ireland’s oldest peace and reconciliation organisation), and Zia Chaudhry (Director of Liverpool John Moore’s Foundation for Citizenship) in conversation with Peter Francis.…
 
In Victorian Britain rags were recycled into paper. Many of the urban poor made their living from collecting rags which were processed in paper mills before eventually being transformed into paper for books and newspapers. The personnel involved in recycling – beggars, orphaned children, rag-and-bone collectors and dealers in waste – featured i ...…
 
Two key figures in the cultural renaissance of our local area, Artistic Director of Theatr Clwyd, Tamara Harvey, and founder of Pedlars and The Good Life Experience, Charlie Gladstone, talk to the Library’s Warden, Peter Francis, about their cultural plans for the year and hopes for the future.Illustration: David Setter…
 
There ARE still wild places out there on our crowded planet – and Dan Richards has spent the last few years visiting some of them. From Cairngorm bothies to fire-watch lookouts in Washington State, Roald Dahl’s writing hut to a lighthouse in the North Atlantic, haunted Icelandic ‘houses of joy’ to frozen Russian ghost towns now only home to bea ...…
 
We were delighted to welcome Patrick back to Gladfest with his latest book, Take Nothing With You. A Sunday Times bestseller within a week of its launch at the Edinburgh International Book Festival, Patrick’s 16th novel tells the story of fifty-something Eustace, a gay Londoner of leisure. In the same week that he falls hopelessly in love with ...…
 
Neil has appeared in the film adaptions of Nick Hornby’s Fever Pitch and Helen Fielding’s Bridget Jones’s Diary, as well as producing The Missing Hancocks for BBC Radio 4. But he is also an antiquarian book dealer, and has recently spent much of his time curating the archive of the late Alan Rickman. Neil gives a fascinating hour as he discusse ...…
 
Damian Le Bas grew up surrounded by Gypsy history. His great-grandmother would tell him stories of her childhood in the ancient Romani language; the places her family stopped and worked, the ways they lived, the superstitions and lores of their people. But his own experience of life on the road was limited to Ford Transit journeys from West Sus ...…
 
In 1958, Sylvia Blackwell, fresh from one of the new post-war Library Schools, takes up a job as children's librarian in a run-down library in the market town of East Mole. Her mission is to fire the enthusiasm of the children of East Mole for reading. But her love affair with the local married GP, and her befriending of his precious daughter, ...…
 
Herbert Powyss longs to make his mark in the field of science - something consequential enough to present to the Royal Society in London. He hits on a radical experiment in isolation: for seven years a subject will inhabit three rooms in the cellar of a manor house, fitted out with books, paintings and even a chamber organ. The solitude will be ...…
 
'It is in the shelter of each other that the people live.' Drawing on this Irish saying, poet, storyteller and theologian Pádraig Ó Tuama relates ideas of shelter and welcome to journeys of life, using poetry, story, biblical reflection and prose to open up gentle ways of living well in a troubled world. Interweaving everyday stories with narra ...…
 
After a wonderful Hearth session in November 2018, we’re bringing poetry and what it can mean for mental health to Hearth’s older sibling. Three of the North-West’s best poets, Angela Topping, Angi Holden and Deborah Alma, discuss the written word’s power to express, articulate, and respond to mental health.…
 
Along with Sally Tomlinson, Danny Dorling has written one of the most interesting books on a subject that has threatened to overwhelm us all: Brexit. Called ‘the must-read book about Brexit’ and ‘a much-needed mirror’, Rule Britannia suggests that whatever the outcome, Britain must consider its past if it is ever to make sense of its future. Po ...…
 
We ran out of time in Kit’s 2018 festival interview, so we brought her back for another hour! Kit doesn’t only write bestselling fiction: as editor, fundraiser, and promoter she has been the energy behind a 2018 anthology of contemporary working-class writing. A collection of essays, poems and memoir, Common People celebrates working-class stor ...…
 
Join one of Gladfest’s most notable, energetic speakers for another trip into the surprising side of the Victorian age. In 2017 Simon found an illustrated novel, published in 1877, on the shelves at Chetham’s Library, Manchester. The Story of a Honeymoon was written and illustrated by Charles H. Ross and Ambrose Clarke – but Simon knew better. ...…
 
Our first ever 'Gladfest discusses...' session! A panel of Gladfest speakers, Damian Barr, Kit de Waal and Sarah Perry, take on the relationship between writing and power, exploring some of the most significant historic and contemporary examples.By The digital archive of Gladstone's Library.
 
Do you know the Rosy Gilchrist novels? If you don’t, you should! They are some of the wittiest crime fiction there is. Rosy Gilchrist works at the British Museum and lives a quiet, blameless life – until in 1952 her aunt is murdered. Rosy goes on to solve crimes in four more novels, including the most recent, The Cambridge Plot. Suzette introdu ...…
 
Joe Moran has an eye for the small, everyday things that quite a lot of us might miss – or at least not notice to the same extent. His writing examines mundane phenomena from motorways to watching television, and (in Queuing for Beginners) he investigates everything from phones to train carriages to yes, queuing. His recent work on shyness trac ...…
 
A special preview of the black comedy from one of Wales’ most exciting new playwrights. Hear writer Emily White, director Tamara Harvey and the stars of the show talk about this bold and brilliant play. Set in a run-down spa town in Wales, Pavilion tells the story of a community on the closing night of the much-loved local night spot, as young ...…
 
On Good Friday, 2010, Times journalist Melanie Reid fell from her horse, breaking her neck and fracturing her lower back. She was 52. Paralysed from the top of her chest down, she was to spend almost a full year in hospital, determinedly working towards gaining as much movement in her limbs as possible and learning to navigate her way through a ...…
 
‘Failure is a success if we learn from it’ wrote a certain William Gladstone. But how can a pen, paper or even a laptop liberate us? In this evening event, Writer in Residence Emily Morris discusses how writing the true story of experience of unexpectedly becoming a single parent helped free her from feelings of pain, shame and failure. What’s ...…
 
Our Alibis in the Archive 2019 speakers join us for a panel session to discuss crime writing, their favourite authors, and some tips for budding writers out there!Part of our 2019 Alibis in the Archive weekend.By The digital archive of Gladstone's Library.
 
The two talk crime writing from the past to the present day.Part of our 2019 Alibis in the Archive weekend.By The digital archive of Gladstone's Library.
 
The 30s, the Golden Age of crime writing, saw the emergence of a number of leading female crime writers who can be held responsible for the development of the crime novel. Janet looks at the importance of the female of the species.Part of our 2019 Alibis in the Archive weekend.By The digital archive of Gladstone's Library.
 
Julian Symonds and Michael Gilbert were two of Britain’s leading male crime writers and commentators of the post-war era. Martin discusses their work, their influence on the genre – and on his own writing.Part of our 2019 Alibis in the Archive weekend.By The digital archive of Gladstone's Library.
 
From the beginning, setting has been an intrinsic part of most crime novels. The Hound of the Baskervilles, for example, would have been a very different story - and probably a different dog - if it was set in St Mary Mead. But as the detective novel developed, settings became both more diverse and more specific. Michael Ridpath looks at how cr ...…
 
Why is it that so many great Scottish crime writers over the years have been drawn to the darkest side of the genre? A forensic look at the genetic origins of Tartan Noir.Part of our 2019 Alibis in the Archive weekend.By The digital archive of Gladstone's Library.
 
Frances Fyfield gives a personal memoir of P.D. James.Part of our 2019 Alibis in the Archive weekend,By The digital archive of Gladstone's Library.
 
Join one of the world’s best-known crime writers as he reflects on a life in writing. A novelist and short-story writer, Peter Robinson is the creator of Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks, a character featured in over 20 novels, many of which have been critically rewarded as well as being popular best-sellers. Part of our Alibis in the Archi ...…
 
Everyone thinks they know Agatha Christie. This may be because she is the most successful crime writer in the history of the world. But it is also because she writes such pared-down, pure examples of the genre. In researching her for her own 'Agatha Christie' mysteries, Alison was struck by how she uses Poirot, Marple and co as her 'voice', so ...…
 
Edmund Crispin is perhaps unique amongst crime writers in that he was also, under his real name of Bruce Montgomery, a professional composer. David talks about Montgomery’s life, gives a few examples of his musical style, and examines how he makes use of music and his experience of the music industry in some of his novels. Part of our Alibis in ...…
 
Director of Collections and Research Louisa Yates and Marketing Manager Amy Sumner chat to Paul Jeorrett on his Calon FM show, Calon Talks Books, about the exciting plans in place for #Gladfest19. Some of the festival's speakers choose their favourite 'literary tracks'.By The digital archive of Gladstone's Library.
 
Pastor and Theologian Mitri Raheb gives this year’s Robinson-Spong lecture exploring the Bible and contemporary Christianity from a Palestinian perspective.By The digital archive of Gladstone's Library.
 
At least 50% of theatre is visual but playwrights are seldom considered to write the visuals so much as the words actors speak. In Oliver Emanuel's career he has written a play without words. He has written for puppets. When he writes radio drama, he is always thinking about what the audience will see. Using his own work and practice as a start ...…
 
The role of animals in human society is a topic of increasing significance. Susanna Forrest – author of The Age of the Horse (2016) – explores the challenges of doing animals justice in contemporary non-fiction. In a unique hour, Susanna shows how her own particular field – equine culture and history – has much to teach us about history, litera ...…
 
We love speculative fiction: books exploring prospective future worlds in realistic styles have enduring popularity in bestseller lists and critics’ hearts. But why are we so drawn to it? What does speculative fiction help us come to terms with? What can it tell us about ourselves – and do we really want to know? Sophie Mackintosh suggests answ ...…
 
Alys Conran is one of Britain’s most exciting new writers. Her first novel, Pigeon, was praised for its humanity and skill: ‘might have been authored by Faulkner’, one critic wrote. Appropriately enough for a festival called Hearth, Alys’s second novel Dignity (forthcoming in 2019) is all about the places we call home. It tells the story of thr ...…
 
Tania Hershman might be a poet. She might be a short story writer, or an editor, a critic, a blogger, a journalist and a short fiction activist (via her website ShortStops). She has been Writer in Residence at Gladstone’s Library and at a university biochemistry department, and is currently writer in residence in a cemetery. Her writing is ecle ...…
 
It’s 2nd March 1975 and two babies are born: Yonas Kelati in Eritrea, and Jude Munro in Britain. 30 years later, Yonas’s asylum case ends up on Jude’s desk – their lives couldn’t be more different, and yet one hinges on the other. A multi-voice novel, The Invisible Crowd is a compelling exploration of the British asylum system, the lottery of b ...…
 
Jacqueline Saphra’s A Bargain with the Light: Poems After Lee Miller was published by Hercules Editions in 2017. In this hour Jacqueline takes a closer look at the life and work of Lee Miller, extraordinary and courageous photographer and trailblazer for women. Jacqueline offers some background about Miller’s place in twentieth-century history ...…
 
Alan Cadwallader delivers this year’s Robinson-Spong public lecture, considering the challenge of material culture to metaphysical readings of the Bible.By The digital archive of Gladstone's Library.
 
Keggie Carew’s memoir, Dadland (2016), won the Costa Biography Award 2017 for its spellbinding account of her unorthodox, engaging, complicated father. Appropriately, the book’s subtitle is ‘a journey into uncharted territory’, and this is the subject of Keggie’s evening event. Writing about a close family member brings with it difficult decisi ...…
 
Tara Guha is an expert at writing in the snatches of time that others might think are impossible. Her first novel, 2015’s bestselling Untouchable Things, was written as her daughter napped; this summer her Twitter feed detailed her new novel being written and edited in tents, during swimming breaks, amid swarms of bees and on trains. The adrena ...…
 
Liz Flanagan’s writing is known for its gripping, thrilling tone and powerful friendships. Her first young adult novel, Eden Summer, tells the story of Jess and her friend Eden, and is set in West Yorkshire. The two girls know everything about one another – but when Eden goes missing Jess realises there’s a lot Eden has never shared. Liz’s seco ...…
 
Mental health has long been intimately linked with poetic expression. Reading and writing poetry can help to articulate struggles and find shared experiences; it can contribute to wellbeing and form part of a strategy of coping. It can be private musing or a public declaration. Angela Topping recently contributed to a new anthology of poetry on ...…
 
Peace at Last: A Portrait of Armistice Day, 11 November 1918 is a vivid, original, and intimate hour-by-hour account of Armistice Day 1918, to mark its centenary this year.11th November 2018 marks the centenary of the armistice signed between the Allies and Germany ending World War I. While the events of the war and its legacy are much discusse ...…
 
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