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In the latest CSP episode, we harken back to the early Jin Dynasty 晋朝 and the zaniness of the Sima Clan following the death of Emperor Wu of Jin. Plenty of blood flowed during the shake-out period as the 3rd century AD came to a close. But it wasn't all bad. From this period we get the great Chinese Saying, Gǒu Wěi Xù Diāo 狗尾续貂. Keep this one in yo…
 
In addition to the latest CHP episode on the L.A. Chinatown Massacre, I also wanted to offer you a reading of an article that appeared in an 1894 edition of The Historical Society of Southern California journal. This article by C.P. Dorland was written only twenty-three years after the incident took place and described the events leading up to, dur…
 
On October 24th, 1871 the Los Angeles Chinatown Massacre took place near the present-day location of Union Station, just north of the core downtown L.A. area. Though mostly unknown rather than forgotten, this incident that happened one hundred fifty years ago this month will be remembered through a number of commemorative events. The Chinese Americ…
 
Today's CSP offering goes way way back to the time of Ancient Chu State during the 7th century BC. The famous "Hé Shì Bì" 和氏璧 Jade ornament discussed years ago in CSP episode S3E01 once again takes center stage. In this prequel to that S3E01 episode, we see how a poor farmer (He Shi) discovers this priceless jade and makes multiple failed attempts …
 
We're going to wind things down with this episode. 1863-1864, the bitter and bloody end of the Taiping Rebellion. Charles George Gordon has his walk-on but Zeng Guofan and brother Zeng Guoquan take the limelight in the ultimate showdown with the Taiping holdouts. When it was all over, the Taiping Rebellion ended up having quite a consequential impa…
 
As Porky Pig used to say, "That's all folks". But only for this Chinese tea history series. There's more coming rest assured. Please stay subscribed so that you won't miss any new episodes. I'm already working on the next episode, one that's guaranteed to please. I thank you all for listening. Please consider checking out the other two Teacup Media…
 
Today's Chinese Saying, Bān Mén Nòng Fǔ 班门弄斧 comes to us courtesy of the Tang and Song Dynasty luminaries Liu Zongyuan and Ouyang Xiu who teach us about the Zhou Dynasty hero Lu Ban. He knew how to use an axe to build stuff like no one else. You don't want to stand outside his doorway and brag about your axe-wielding skills. This is a good one to u…
 
We continue on with a tour of the provinces, looking at some of the more renowned teas each place has to offer. Teas such as Dancong, Tieguanyin, Jinjunmei, and Da Hong Pao are introduced. Various teas from Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Sichuan, Hubei, and Hunan are discussed. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/the-tea…
 
After the Convention of Beijing was signed in 1860, the foreign pers weren't so sure about the Taiping's anymore. For the sake of preserving their hard-won gains in the Second Opium War, they hopped down off that fence and sided with the Qing forces. In this episode, we hear about Frederick Townshend Ward and the Ever Victorious Army. 1862 was the …
 
Today's THP episode will go from province to province and look at a variety of famous teas such as Longjing, Gunpowder, Huangshan Maofeng, Lu'an Guapian, Xinyang Maojian, Taiping Houkui and a few others. All of the teas to be introduced began their brilliant careers as tribute teas sent annually to the emperor. You too can savor these teas fit for …
 
Another classic from the long list of great Chinese Sayings. 守株待兔 Shǒu Zhū Dài Tù. Thank Han Feizi for this one. He teaches us not to sit around and wait for good luck to find us. Just because you got lucky once doesn't mean lightning will strike twice. In this quick story about the farmer in Song State, we learn sometimes it's better to go out and…
 
In this episode, we focus on the category of tea that is most admired by many tea experts the world over. Pu-Erh tea was introduced sometime during the Ming Dynasty and in time, became the oft-called "King of Teas" for its rich and unique flavor, wholly unlike any other tea produced in China. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/the-tea-…
 
Hi Everyone this is Laszlo Montgomery of the China History Podcast and along with Avid.fm I’m once again pleased to present to you a set of lectures that present an Introduction to the History of Chinese Philosophy. In Part I of a two-part series of lectures I will trace the main events in Chinese Philosophy going back to pre-Confucian times in the…
 
After seizing the all-important city of Nanjing in March 1853 and basking in the afterglow of this victory, the Taiping leadership launches two military expeditions, one to the north to capture the capital, Beijing, and the other to the west. In this episode, we'll see how those two ventures panned out. Then in 1856, comes the first major political…
 
After enjoying a monopoly that lasted for 45 centuries, China's secrets of how they turned Camellia sinensis leaves into tea are shared with the world (but not by the Chinese). This time we see how the tea seeds, plants, tools, and experts are secreted out of China and successfully brought to the Indian highlands. There a British dream team of bota…
 
Remember that O'Jay's tune from 1972, "Backstabbers"? They must have had Tang Dynasty chancellor Li Linfu in mind. The story behind our Chinese Saying for this time 口蜜腹剑 tells the story of this 8th-century politician/official who served the great Emperor Xuanxong (玄宗). All the time, they want to take your place, the backstabbers (backstabbers). Bew…
 
The hero who ensured Robert Fortune's success, Dr. Nathanial Bagshaw Ward is introduced in this episode. Ward's invention of the terrarium was the one thing that provided the breakthrough for Robert Fortune. We see how Fortune went into China, scored plants and tea seeds from Zhejiang, Anhui and Fujian and got everything safely loaded onto a vessel…
 
We're back with more of the Taiping Rebellion. In this episode, we trace the Taiping Rebels as they make their way from Yong'an in Guangxi all the way to the southern capital of Nanjing. As they make their way north and east towards western Jiangsu they grow in numbers and seize great amounts of weapons, silver, and boats. Support this podcast at —…
 
The mid 19th Century brought a sea change to the tea industry. Demand continued to grow all over Europe. China's artisanal tea growers and the general unreliability of the China market due to all the well-known political and social disasters happening in China raise concerns. The idea to make a go at growing tea in India is seriously discussed. We …
 
Welcome back to the fourth season of the Chinese Sayings Podcast...after three years and seven months, we continue on where we left off with another story behind one of the great Chinese Sayings, or chengyu. This time around we harken back to the "Strategies of the Warring States" to look at the tale of drawing legs on a snake. Don't forget, all th…
 
Midway through the Qing Dynasty trouble is brewing along with the tens of millions of pounds of tea being imported into Britain. The Qianlong Emperor rebuffs Britain's envoy and puts a major damper on the prospects of China trade. Britain finds the perfect commodity to trade for tea, Patna Opium from India. This ultimately leads to conflict culmina…
 
Now's as good a time as any to finally feature this well-known, regularly requested topic from Qing history. This is arguably the pivotal event that got the dominos falling that led to the Warlord Era and the later founding of the PRC. For anyone unfamiliar with the Taiping Rebellion, how it got started, and the situation in China during the mid 19…
 
In this episode we move to the other side of the world to look at some tea history in the British Colonies. The tea trade by now has transformeded into an entire industry and becomes the most important traded commodity of the British East India Company. Twining's emerges onto the scene along with coffeehouse culture where tea was also to be had. Ov…
 
Europeans were no less enthusiastic about tea than anyone else. It started off with the royals and aristocrats. But once prices came down and the haves and have-nots got to enjoy it, the demand will become insatiable. The Russian tea caravans are also explored. Though their tea culture was different from the ways of the Europeans, Russian people lo…
 
Laszlo picks up in 1818 with the Napoleonic Wars finished and the Dutch returning to their colonies to put everything back the way it was when they left. The struggle between the Dutch and the Chinese kongsis of West Borneo discussed previously continues with a fight to the finish in Part 2. The legacy of this century of history that occurred in Ka…
 
During the late 16th century, the Jesuit Fathers become the first Europeans to drink tea. Soon afterward the Portuguese and Dutch traders start poking their noses around China and Japan. They too learn of this amazing beverage and see excellent prospects in their home markets. By the early 17th century The Dutch and British East India Companies are…
 
More Ming Dynasty tea history this time. Further innovations from China's tea artisans further improves the taste and experience of tea. The famous "zisha" clay teapots and tea ware from Yixing, Jiangsu province are introduced as well as their role in the Gongfu Tea Ceremony. As the second half of the Ming Dynasty starts to wind down, the Europeans…
 
The history of the Overseas Chinese in Southeast Asia is rich with all kinds of lesser-known or forgotten tales, like this one. A kongsi 公司 today means a company. But when Chinese immigrants from Eastern Guangdong and Southern Fujian were heading in the direction of West Borneo to engage in gold mining, kongsis were established as associations wher…
 
The epic story continues after the greatest advances ever in tea production and tea culture in the Song. After surviving the Mongol Yuan Dynasty Camellia Sinensis experiences revolutionary improvements with the founding of the Ming Dynasty by Zhu Yuanzhang. Now tea starts to become more familiar to us after the Hongwu Emperor demands all future tri…
 
Buddhism continues to embrace tea even further during the Song Dynasty giving rise to the term 茶禪一味 "Tea and Chan Buddhism are one taste." More Huizong, white tea, Japan's Myōan Eisai, and then we'll close with an intro to Wulong (Oolong) Tea and the emergence of the Wuyi Mountains in Fujian province as a tea powerhouse. Support this podcast at — h…
 
Laszlo is pleased to present an interview with longtime Hong Kong resident, writer, and cartoonist Larry Feign to discuss his new novel The Flower Boat Girl. The story is about Zheng Yi Sao, who was one of the most feared pirates in the early 19th century, and at one point, had command of a fleet of over 1,500 ships. Her life was the subject of Epi…
 
In this China History Podcast episode, Laszlo teams up with Rob Moore and Lee Moore (no relation) from The Chinese Literature Podcast to explore the life and work of the highly influential writer Lin Yutang. Though rather unknown in our day, there was a time when Lin Yutang was the most recognizable name in the West who wrote and spoke about China.…
 
No longer is tea a bitter brew sharing a Chinese character with the one used for a bitter vegetable. Royals, officials, scholars, and common people are enjoying tea and writing poems inspired by this beverage that has taken China and Japan by storm. During the Song, tea takes on a new look and feel. We also revisit one of the greatest royal patrons…
 
In the post-Lu Yu world, tea starts to take off like a rocket. It will take a little longer for tea to get the needed traction in Japan but during the Tang, they get to see it and appreciate it up close. We'll also look at one of the early "Tea Persons", the poet and recluse Lu Tong, as well as one of his most famous tea poems. In this episode, we …
 
Hi Everyone I'd like to announce that along with avid.fm I’m pleased to present to you an introduction to the Silk Road - its past, present, and future. If you want to understand the history of the Silk Road and the implications of its modern-day successor, the Belt & Road Initiative, this course will equip you with everything you need to understan…
 
Just in time, we look at all the recent finds at the newly discovered six sacrificial pits at Sanxingdui. Archaeologists and historians are pretty sure all these exciting discoveries going back to 1986 at Sanxingdui, Jinsha, Shangwangjiaguai are from the ancient state of Shu. This topic has been requested constantly throughout the years. I'm glad I…
 
We looked at The Tea Saint, Lu Yu in the last episode. This time we give a once-over to his greatest work, The Cha Jing or Classic of Tea. The national popularity of tea in China really catches fire after Lu Yu shows everyone how to enjoy it, and enjoy life at the same time. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/the-tea-history-podcast/do…
 
In this CHP Special Episode Laszlo is thrilled to welcome Mr. Ian McCollum to discuss his new book, "Pistols of the Warlords: Chinese Domestic Handguns, 1911 – 1949." If you're a fan of antique and historical firearms, you already might know Ian from his Forgotten Weapons YouTube Channel. What poetry was to the Tang Dynasty, arms manufacturing, and…
 
In this episode, we finally introduce the Tea Saint. What Elvis was to rock n' roll, Lu Yu was to the popularity of tea in Chinese society. Here we'll look at his life and his work, "The Classic of Tea". From here on out, tea is no longer tú, and neither is it bitter. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/the-tea-history-podcast/donations…
 
Here's a brief intro to the life of Dr. Yuan Longping who passed away on. May 22, 2021. It was covered quite extensively last week in the Chinese and international press as well as in all the China newsletters. But just in case you missed reading about him I wanted to post this short intro to his life and achievements. Support this podcast at — htt…
 
We're going to finish off this survey of Henan from Neolithic times to the 20th century. In this episode, you'll get a closer look at Zhengzhou and a few other noteworthy slivers of Henan history. We'll close off with the hard times that hit Henan in 1887, 1938, 1942, 1959, and 1975. If you never appreciated Henan's place in Chinese history I hope …
 
After centuries of trial and error, tea starts to transform from a bitter medicinal brew into something worthy of presenting to the emperor as tribute. Tea's rise during the Sui and Tang are introduced this time. The important role tea played in Tibet and other border regions is also discussed. The Tea Saint, Lu Yu will be saved for the next episod…
 
Tea's progress as an enjoyable beverage starts to make some headway since Shen Nong's time. But it's still one bitter brew during the Bronze Age centuries. Tea remains a work in progress but showing tremendous promise. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/the-tea-history-podcast/donations Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/bran…
 
The saga continues. More poking around Henan in Part 2. We'll look at the Zhou Dynasty era states that made up the province in ancient times. We'll also focus on Luoyang, Kaifeng and Anyang. If the multitude of Chinese names starts to overwhelm, go to the website at Teacup.Media and download a nice cheat sheet I put together especially for you. Sup…
 
Welcome to the Tea History Podcast inaugural episode. In this first episode we'll explore tea's humble beginnings in the Ba and Shu States. We'll also look at the mythical story of the discovery of tea by the Divine Farmer, Shen Nong. We have a long way to go. Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/the-tea-history-podcast/donations Adverti…
 
Laszlo is here with a sort of new podcast show introducing the mythical and historical timeline of one of the most popular beverages in the world. Other than the air we breathe and the water we drink, nothing is consumed in greater quantities than "The China Drink" as it was known in Europe during its earliest days. From its ancient beginnings to o…
 
This is Part 1 of a four-part series focusing on the Chinese history that happened in one of China's oldest provinces. In Part 1 we get the lay of the land in Henan, discuss its mythical beginnings as well as the neolithic cultures of Peiligang, Yangshao, Longshan, and Erlitou. We also take the offramp to look at a couple of the more well-known Hen…
 
In this shortest CHP episode since 2011, we conclude the series that explored the lives of eunuchs in Chinese history. This time around we wind things down with eunuchs during the time of the Last Emperor Puyi in the course of his residency in the Forbidden City, Tianjin and Manchukuo. Then we look briefly at the life of the Last Eunuch Sun Yaoting…
 
In this penultimate episode of the Eunuchs series, we finally make it to the Qing Dynasty. After everything that transpired during the Ming, the Qing is tame by those standards. From Dorgon to Daoguang things were pretty tame in the Qing. But once Empress Dowager Cixi grabs hold of the reigns of power, she allows her eunuchs, most notably An Dehai …
 
Three of the Four Tigers, Wang Zhi, Liu Jin, and Wei Zhongxian get a once over this time around in Part 4. Many historians agree these guys offered the most generous contribution to the fall of the Ming Dynasty. At least no emperors were captured in battle during their time in the palace. But one emperor did have to hang himself from a tree thanks …
 
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