show episodes
 
Future Ecologies is a podcast about relationships: between, within, amongst, and all around us. Made for audiophiles and nature lovers alike, every episode is an invitation to see the world in a new light – set to original music & immersive soundscapes, and weaving together interviews with expert knowledge holders.
 
At Popular Science, we report and write dozens of science and tech stories every week. And while a lot of the fun facts we stumble across make it into our articles, there are lots of other weird facts that we just keep around the office. So we figured, why not share those with you? Welcome to The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/popular-science/support
 
Each week we bring you a new, in-depth exploration of the space where science and society collide. We’re committed to the idea that making an effort to understand the world around you though science and critical thinking can benefit everyone—and lead to better decisions. We want to find out what’s true, what’s left to discover, and why it all matters.
 
Ever wanted to know how music affects your brain, what quantum mechanics really is, or how black holes work? Do you wonder why you get emotional each time you see a certain movie, or how on earth video games are designed? Then you’ve come to the right place. Each week, Sean Carroll will host conversations with some of the most interesting thinkers in the world. From neuroscientists and engineers to authors and television producers, Sean and his guests talk about the biggest ideas in science, ...
 
Open science concepts explained as stories in 10 minutes or less, hosted by Heidi Seibold. We'd love to hear your story! If you think you might have a story to tell, write an e-mail to opensciencestories@gmail.com This podcast is licensed under CC-BY 4.0 RSS feed: https://anchor.fm/s/46287364/podcast/rss Contact: opensciencestories@gmail.com
 
A podcast for the bold and curious to help you navigate our world's accelerating weirdness — about science and the philosophy of it, prehistory and post-humanity and deep time, non-human agency and non-duality, science fiction and the stories we regard as real, complex systems and sustainability (or lack thereof), psychedelics as a form of training for a weirding present and proliferating futures, art and creativity as service and as inquiry. Join paleontologist-futurist Michael Garfield eve ...
 
David Yakobovitch explores AI for consumers through fireside conversations with industry thought leaders on HumAIn. From Chief Data Scientists and AI Advisors, to Leaders who advance AI for All, the HumAIn Podcast is the channel to release new AI products, to learn about industry trends, and to bridge the gap between humans and machines in the Fourth Industrial Revolution.
 
Listen to PBS NewsHour science reporting published every Wednesday by 9 p.m. Featuring reports from Miles O'Brien, Nsikan Akpan and the rest of our science crew, we take on topics ranging from the future of 3-D printing to power of placebo drugs. Is this not what you're looking for? Don't miss our other podcasts for our full shows, individual segments, Brooks and Capehart, Brief but Spectacular, Politics Monday and more. Find them in iTunes or in your favorite podcasting app. PBS NewsHour is ...
 
Each week, the Grow Your Practice Podcast with Chad Madden of Breakthrough brings you no-nonsense marketing & business growth strategies that deliver new patients and higher profits. Co-Founder of Breakthrough, Owner of Madden Physical Therapy and Author of "Killer Marketing Secrets for Private Practice PTs", Chad grew his practice 600% in the last five years using direct response marketing strategies. He sees more than 200 new patients each month in his single location Private Practice. Now ...
 
Are you a researcher or data scientist / analyst / ninja? Do you want to learn Bayesian inference, stay up to date or simply want to understand what Bayesian inference is? Then this podcast is for you! You'll hear from researchers and practitioners of all fields about how they use Bayesian statistics, and how in turn YOU can apply these methods in your modeling workflow. When I started learning Bayesian methods, I really wished there were a podcast out there that could introduce me to the me ...
 
Produced in conjunction with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and their consumer site, HealthyChildren.org, Healthy Children is hosted by our favorite Mom: Melanie Cole, MS. Join Melanie as she interviews expert pediatricians and discusses all aspects of your children’s health and well-being. From infants to teens, potty training to bullying, to prom safety – this is your ultimate audio parenting guide available On Demand 24/7!
 
A weekly Python podcast hosted by Christopher Bailey with interviews, coding tips, and conversation with guests from the Python community. The show covers a wide range of topics including Python programming best practices, career tips, and related software development topics. Join us every Friday morning to hear what's new in the world of Python programming and become a more effective Pythonista.
 
A podcast capturing the stories of scientific brilliance. For a long time, science podcasts have been about DrySci (“Dry science”). It relates topics at too high a level or too generalistic. We aim to change that by bringing the stories of the people, their motivations and specifically the struggles and glories of stories past that will seek to reinvigorate, rejuvenate and respect the minds before the results. This podcast is an effort to soothe that incurable itch in your brain. We ask ques ...
 
Stay current with the latest studies in radiation oncology with free podcasts from the official journals of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). The International Journal of Radiation Oncology-Biology-Physics (the Red Journal) publishes the latest clinical research related to radiation oncology, radiation biology, medical physics, education, and health policy. The overarching mission of Practical Radiation Oncology is to improve the quality of radiation oncology practice thro ...
 
We believe in the educational merits of Free Open Access Medical education (FOAM), which includes podcasts, blogs, articles on PubMed Central, conferences streamed for free and more. As a result, we would like to encourage others to move beyond quoting podcasts and into the realm of tying “cutting edge” FOAM to the core content. We’ll provide some review and references for listeners to go read. Why, indeed, should we FOAM it alone when FOAM can inspire us to go, read, think, and be excellent?
 
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show series
 
Democracy: Clarifying the Muddle is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and renowned political theorist John Dunn, University of Cambridge. Through an engaging dialogue format, John Dunn candidly shares his deep insights on the historical development and current significance and future of democracy in different parts of t…
 
Investigating Intelligence is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and neuroscientist John Duncan, University of Cambridge, and examines fascinating questions in neuroscience such as: What is intelligence and what does IQ testing tell us? Can intelligence be measured and improved? What role does our frontal lobe play in ex…
 
The Science of Siren Songs: Stradivari Unveiled is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and master violinmaker and acoustician Joseph Curtin, recipient of a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship. This in-depth conversation explores Curtin’s long quest to characterize the sound of a Stradivari violin and the rigorous series of d…
 
How Social Science Creates the World is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and UC Berkeley political scientist Professor Mark Bevir. Mark Bevir is an internationally acclaimed expert in the theory of governance. This thought-provoking conversation explores how attempts to shoehorn political science into a natural science…
 
The COVID-19 delta variant has been surging worldwide and in certain areas of the U.S. What will this mean for school openings, and for children not yet eligible for vaccines? And how are vaccine efforts going in America? ProPublica reporter Caroline Chen joins Hari Sreenivasan with the latest on COVID-19 in the U.S. and around the world. PBS NewsH…
 
Can science be truly open if it doesn't allow for all perspectives? In this episode we talk diversity and inclusion with associate professor at the UMC Utrecht Gönül Dilaver. Also, we touch base on the newsynews and talk education with Gönül. Shownotes: - Interview Paul Boselie on not using the Journal Impact Factor: https://www.nature.com/articles…
 
During the nadir of race relations in the United States South from 1877 to 1932, African Americans faced segregation, disfranchisement, and lynching. Among many forms of resistance, African Americans used their musical and theatrical talents to challenge white supremacy, attain economic opportunity, and transcend segregation. In Rough Tactics: Blac…
 
Every day millions of Tamil women in southeast India wake up before dawn to create a kolam, an ephemeral ritual design made with rice flour, on the thresholds of homes, businesses and temples. This thousand-year-old ritual welcomes and honors Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth and alertness, and Bhudevi, the goddess of the earth. Created by hand with g…
 
Listen to this interview of Peter Kaufman, Program Manager in Strategic Initiatives and Resource Development at MIT Open Learning and author of The New Enlightenment and the Fight to Free Knowledge (Seven Stories Press, 2021). We talk about us. All of us. Peter Kaufman : "Well, I'd say this about how to bring about the change my book calls for. Tak…
 
In considering how legislation moves forward in the American political system, we often think about elected representatives sitting in committee hearings or Senators speaking from the floor of the Senate to make a particular point. Woven into all of these ideas, which are not misguided, is the role (often behind the scenes) that congressional leade…
 
Becoming a mother is a huge, complicated life transition that can rock every fiber of a person's being. The process even has its own name: matrescence. That postpartum feeling of being on an emotional rollercoaster, not recognizing your body in the mirror, thinking that you've lost yourself—it's all part of the process. Yet, not a lot of people tal…
 
This episode of Cleaning Up is based on a October 2020 blog written by Michael for BloombergNEF https://about.bnef.com/blog/liebreich-separating-hype-from-hydrogen-part-one-the-supply-side/ We would like to thank BloombergNEF for allowing us to record it.By Michael Liebreich
 
What is a border? Is it simply an edge: a sharp transition between one state and another? Or does it stretch beyond a single dimension, warping land and people through a self-perpetuating 'otherness'? In this final chapter of Goatwalker, we uncover the ties that bind ecosystems, identities, and communities of all sorts – migrant or otherwise. We'll…
 
Speaking of Psychology is taking a one-week summer break, so we’re revisiting one of our favorite episodes from the past year. In February, we talked to University of California, Berkeley psychologist Alison Gopnik about how children’s brains are optimized to explore the world and the implications that this has for human evolution, how we think abo…
 
Property rights are important for economic exchange, but many governments don't protect them. Private market organizations can fill this gap by providing an institutional structure to enforce agreements, but with this power comes the ability to extort group members. Under what circumstances, then, will private organizations provide a stable environ…
 
Listen to this interview of Alex Csiszar, professor in the Department of the History of Science, Harvard University and author of The Scientific Journal: Authorship and the Politics of Knowledge in the Nineteenth Century (U Chicago Press, 2018). We talk about the British, the French, and the Germans. No joke. Alex Csiszar : "There's this myth out t…
 
In The Teacher Insurgency: A Strategic and Organizing Perspective (Harvard Education Press, 2020), Leo Casey addresses how the unexpected wave of recent teacher strikes has had a dramatic impact on American public education, teacher unions, and the larger labor movement. Casey explains how this uprising was not only born out of opposition to govern…
 
Women’s International Thought: A New History (Cambridge University Press, 2021) is the first cross-disciplinary history of women's international thought. Bringing together some of the foremost historians and scholars of international relations working today, this book recovers and analyzes the path-breaking work of eighteen leading thinkers of inte…
 
In When Brains Dream: Exploring the Science and Mystery of Sleep (W. W. Norton, 2021), psychologist Dr. Antonio Zadra and neuroscientist Dr. Robert Stickgold offer a fascinating survey of the biological and psychological bases of dreams and dreaming. The authors address head-on fundamental questions such as why do we dream? Do dreams hold psycholog…
 
Property rights are important for economic exchange, but many governments don't protect them. Private market organizations can fill this gap by providing an institutional structure to enforce agreements, but with this power comes the ability to extort group members. Under what circumstances, then, will private organizations provide a stable environ…
 
Property rights are important for economic exchange, but many governments don't protect them. Private market organizations can fill this gap by providing an institutional structure to enforce agreements, but with this power comes the ability to extort group members. Under what circumstances, then, will private organizations provide a stable environ…
 
Listen to this interview of Alex Csiszar, professor in the Department of the History of Science, Harvard University and author of The Scientific Journal: Authorship and the Politics of Knowledge in the Nineteenth Century (U Chicago Press, 2018). We talk about the British, the French, and the Germans. No joke. Alex Csiszar : "There's this myth out t…
 
In this episode of Smart Talks, Malcolm talks to Jim Whitehurst, senior advisor at IBM and an expert in open source software and innovation. During their conversation, Jim reveals how embracing moments that initially feel like chaos can ultimately lead to more open organizations, and broader access to new ideas. Learn more about your ad-choices at …
 
In this episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind, Robert and Joe discuss regression to the mean, a phenomenon that occurs when a random sampling point is an outlier -- with applications to everything from economics and sports to health, religion and disappointing sequels. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
Mike Jay is a renowned cultural historian and author of 4 fine books. We recently invited Mike to join us on our SKRAPS club session on Clubhouse app. We were also joined by Krish Ashok on the stage. Krish is the author of Masala Lab, a book on the science of Indian cooking. Mike's website: www.mikejay.net Find us on ClubHouse…
 
Summary Data lake architectures have largely been biased toward batch processing workflows due to the volume of data that they are designed for. With more real-time requirements and the increasing use of streaming data there has been a struggle to merge fast, incremental updates with large, historical analysis. Vinoth Chandar helped to create the H…
 
How are peoples' ideas about languages, ways of speaking and expressive styles shaped by their social positions and values? How is difference, in language and in social life, made - and unmade? How and why are some differences persuasive as the basis for action, while other differences are ignored or erased? Written by two recognised authorities on…
 
Welcome to Cover Story, a podcast by New Books Network devoted to long form journalism. Today, we are talking to Texas-based writer Sarah Hepola. Hepola is most known from her brave writing about drinking and the 2015 bestselling memoir Blackout: Remembering the Things I Drank to Forget. She's appeared on NPR’s Fresh Air and published in The New Yo…
 
Ideas about how to study and understand cultural history—particularly literature—are rapidly changing as new digital archives and tools for searching them become available. This is not the first information age, however, to challenge ideas about how and why we value literature and the role numbers might play in this process. The Values in Numbers: …
 
Our kids are heading back to school soon, most likely in person this time. But after a year of staying home with no routines, it can be a bit nervewracking to think about heading back to the busy halls of a bustling school. Our kids are heading back to school soon, most likely in person this time. But after a year of staying home with no routines, …
 
Money can feel like a taboo topic in a lot of households, but talking about it regularly can take the awkwardness out of it. Kids see and do everything that we do, and that's true when it comes to money, says financial expert Jen Hemphill. In this episode, Hemphill shares her top tips for financial literacy for kids and families, including how to s…
 
This week, we’re re-heating one of our ooey-gooey all-time favorite eps: We re-trace the delicious and X-rated history of... cheese, with cheese biochemist and historian Paul Kindstedt. Plus, tips on how to make the most of the dairy aisle from processed cheese expert Lloyd Metzger. And a cicada killer update from cicada killer wasp biologist Chuck…
 
The arrow of time — all the ways in which the past differs from the future — is a fascinating subject because it connects everyday phenomena (memory, aging, cause and effect) to deep questions in physics and philosophy. At its heart is the fact that entropy increases over time, which in turn can be traced to special conditions in the early universe…
 
Do newborns think-do they know that 'three' is greater than 'two'? Do they prefer 'right' to 'wrong'? What about emotions--do newborns recognize happiness or anger? If they do, then how are our inborn thoughts and feelings encoded in our bodies? Could they persist after we die? Going all the way back to ancient Greece, human nature and the mind-bod…
 
Since 2004 the Malay-Muslim majority provinces in the border region of southern Thailand have been wracked by a violent insurgency. Over 7000 people have been killed and many thousands more injured. Currently 60,000 Thai security personnel are stationed in the region to conduct counter-insurgency operations. Another 80,000 people have been organize…
 
Set in the eastern state of Odisha in a district known as the “Somalia of India,” Everyday State and Politics in India: Government in the Backyard in Kalahandi (Routledge 2018) studies a development project in a region iconic for development failure. Drawing on rich fieldwork with a watershed development project in district Kalahandi, anthropologis…
 
Do newborns think-do they know that 'three' is greater than 'two'? Do they prefer 'right' to 'wrong'? What about emotions--do newborns recognize happiness or anger? If they do, then how are our inborn thoughts and feelings encoded in our bodies? Could they persist after we die? Going all the way back to ancient Greece, human nature and the mind-bod…
 
On this episode of the Economic and Business History channel I spoke with Dr. Chinmay Tumbe, Assistant Professor of Economics at the Indian Institute of Management. He was Alfred D Chandler Jr. International Visiting Scholar in Business History, Harvard Business School in 2018. Dr, Tumbe has published academic articles in Management and Organizatio…
 
Weaving together personal story and broad analysis, Bagila Burkhabayeva’s The Vanishing Generation: Revolution, Religion, and Disappearance in Modern Uzbekistan (Indiana UP, 2019) deals with the question of Islam and its repression during the period of Islam Karimov’s rule in newly independent Uzbekistan. As witness to the infamous Zhaslyk prison a…
 
Is there an ideal portfolio of investment assets, one that perfectly balances risk and reward? In Pursuit of the Perfect Portfolio (Princeton UP, 2021) examines this question by profiling and interviewing ten of the most prominent figures in the finance world—Jack Bogle, Charley Ellis, Gene Fama, Marty Leibowitz, Harry Markowitz, Bob Merton, Myron …
 
Set in the eastern state of Odisha in a district known as the “Somalia of India,” Everyday State and Politics in India: Government in the Backyard in Kalahandi (Routledge 2018) studies a development project in a region iconic for development failure. Drawing on rich fieldwork with a watershed development project in district Kalahandi, anthropologis…
 
Do newborns think-do they know that 'three' is greater than 'two'? Do they prefer 'right' to 'wrong'? What about emotions--do newborns recognize happiness or anger? If they do, then how are our inborn thoughts and feelings encoded in our bodies? Could they persist after we die? Going all the way back to ancient Greece, human nature and the mind-bod…
 
Despite its legal-sounding moniker, a relationship contract isn't a binding agreement. Rather, it's a tool for couples to express their needs and work together to craft the parameters of their own unique relationship roadmap: including anything and everything from health and housework, to sex and intimacy. Writer Mandy Len Catron says crafting a re…
 
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