Speakers at the Unitarian Church of Quincy public
[search 0]
×
Best Speakers at the Unitarian Church of Quincy podcasts we could find (updated March 2020)
Best Speakers at the Unitarian Church of Quincy podcasts we could find
Updated March 2020
Join millions of Player FM users today to get news and insights whenever you like, even when you're offline. Podcast smarter with the free podcast app that refuses to compromise. Let's play!
Join the world's best podcast app to manage your favorite shows online and play them offline on our Android and iOS apps. It's free and easy!
More
show episodes
 
Loading …
show series
 
We can keep on having half-conversations about who's right and who's wrong, and further feed the brokenness that threatens to tear us apart. Or we can see each other as part of a larger We -- a We that is broken, but a We that is in this brokenness together. We will explore Parker Palmer's "Healing the Heart of Democracy" for ways to ground our wor…
 
When we, whoever we are, are on the side of pure goodness, and we are locked in a cosmic battle with our enemies, who are on the side of sheer evil; hatred will always beget hatred. To be peacemakers, we must not become like the terrorists. If we do, then terrorism wins. We do not win. They do not win. Terrorism wins. It is not always easy to stand…
 
This is the last in our six part series on Unitarian Universalist theology. We will explore Unitarian Universalist approaches to the concept of spirit. How does the spirit move? Can you be a humanist and include a concept of spirit in your worldview? How do we embody the spirit of life in a way that is not simply personal and private but also publi…
 
Every religion imagines an end point in the evolution of human life, where we arrive at the place where we are living the way life/God/spirit intended for us to live. Martin Luther King called it Beloved Community. Unitarian Universalism, with its focus on social justice, equality, and freedom, has always envisioned us as part of that sacred journe…
 
There are so many metaphors that revolve around the word, "box;" around the concepts of compartmentalizing and catagorizing. In what order do you place the adjectives that can be used to describe yourself? Are you a brown, female, gainfully-employed, Unitarian-Universalist, Republican? Or are you gainfully-employed, a Republican, and a Unitaian Uni…
 
We owe the concept of Scientific Method a debt of gratitude. Epistemology is a curious study. The words of the ancients could lead us into patterns of thought which match their ancient world view. We certainly hope that modern imaginations guide us closer to something like truth than the imaginations of the ancients.…
 
American government has always been based on a paradox: In theory the People are sovereign, but in practice the People are uninformed. Throughout our history we've dealt with that problem in a variety of ways. None of them were perfect, but on the whole they've been serviceable enough for our country to thrive. That sense of unease you felt during …
 
This day was the 15th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. This watershed event continues to shape us as a nation and as a people. How did Unitarian Universalists respond then and how do we respond now to the continued threats posed by religious extremism internationally and domestically?…
 
With the shooting of Trayvon Martin in Florida, a slogan was born, "Black Lives Matter." With the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, a movement was born that has transformed the American political and cultural landscape. This movement is national in scope and local in focus. It asks all of us to wake up and look at our communities with blinders…
 
Unitarian Universalists have a healthy skepticism of a lot of things, including prayer. What does prayer mean to those who are not traditional theists? What does prayer say about the person praying and what they believe? To whom or to what are we praying and for what are we praying? Let's consider a Unitarian Universalist theology of prayer that of…
 
As UU's, we understand faith as a process that is continuously transforming; a process of how we come to understand something larger than ourselves through the questions we ask of life. We wrestle with questions, we don't answer them. Sometimes we practice our faith in a way that makes it unavailable to our children. Our children need experiential …
 
In 1943, Reverend Gerald Fletcher Miller put his life on hold, as so many Americans did, and went to war. His weapons were Bible, hymnal and communion vessels; he brought to battle his faith, compassion, and skill in counseling. He left a parish ministry in East Arlington, Vermont, to serve a congregation of soldiers, doctors and nurses, returning …
 
One of the deepest needs of human beings is to belong. We like to know where we belong, to whom we belong, and what it asks of us. We instinctively look for our tribe. Sometimes this helps us be better human beings, sometimes there are consequences. Being a person of faith asks us to look within and beyond our tribe as we seek to realize our yearni…
 
Often the difference between changing the world and just shaking your fist at it, is having the intestinal fortitude to keep going even when failure seems certain. So where does that persistence come from? Throughout history, one way people have kept going when the odds were stacked against them has been to have optimism built into their worldview.…
 
We can lose by winning. If we win by demonizing and stereotyping, if we win by casting ourselves as the Saved and our opponents as the Damned - then we've lost. If Good vs. Evil is a battle inside each person, then Evil can win in us at the very moment that we are winning in the external world. We can't afford to lose ourselves in polarization; our…
 
In his prelude to Earth Day 2015, Rev. Aaseng reminds us that social justice and the common good are not values that are promoted by the laws of supply and demand. If we are to save our planet from the long-term ravages of global warming, we must not procrastinate further. However you may believe that this Earth was created, the evidence of its imm…
 
The Tragedy of Ferguson Missouri has a history. It's history began before Emancipation; before the Civil War; even before there was a state named Missouri! Local Historian, Terrell Dempsey, tells us stories of Integration as it has been practiced by the established community's leaders, from before Emancipation to the present day.…
 
In Quincy, we call ourselves the Unitarian Church. The other half of Unitarian-Universalism is Universalism. These two faiths, both with their roots in Protestant Christianity, merged in 1961. And still, many of us whose congregations are rooted in Unitarian traditions have only a sketchy understanding of the other U, Universalism.…
 
Unitarians value an independence of spirit that isn't necessarily enjoyed by the communities of believers found in other religious traditions. It is all too easy for Unitarians to become insulated from those who could challenge our thought - if only we would allow them to! We might ask ourselves more often: How truly oommitted are we to the well-be…
 
Unitarian Universalism possesses an idealism that is encapsulated within our seven principles. "The Inherent Worth and Dignity of Every Person" is the first of those principles, and arguably the one upon which all the others depend. It isn't easy to always treat others with the respect that each of us deserves. It is especially difficult when other…
 
On this anniversary of Pearl Harbor Day, Steve reminds us that The Wounds of War continue to haunt the victors and the defeated for generations. Even when an accord has been reached, the bitterness and hatred, the lives maimed and lost, and the time and treasure that have been wasted, continue to erode the spiritual health, the enthusiasm for life,…
 
There is a tension between Americans who identify as "Unitarian Universalist" and Americans who identify as "Christian." Much of humnan spirituality derives from the contemplation of unanswerable questions. Many truly good and gentle Christians cut short their contemplation of the unknowable. And often we Unitarians continue banging our heads again…
 
What should we do with the legacy of the Traditional Religion that many of us grew up with? Many of us feel that we have outgrown the conventional Christianity of our ancestors. Still, there are important questions that were addressed by the ancients. There are valuable lessons within the Christian legacy of our Unitarian and Universalist roots. Ce…
 
Loading …
Google login Twitter login Classic login