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Looking at cinema's present via its past. The Next Picture Show is a biweekly roundtable by the former editorial team of The Dissolve examining how classic films inspire and inform modern movies. Episodes take a deep dive into a classic film and its legacy in the first half, then compare and contrast that film with a modern successor in the second. Hosted and produced by Genevieve Koski, Keith Phipps, Tasha Robinson and Scott Tobias.
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The strain of cynicism that characterizes so much of Alex Garland’s filmography is at its most pronounced in his latest, CIVIL WAR. But paired with Garland’s 2002 debut as a screenwriter, Danny Boyle’s 28 DAYS LATER, an interesting counterpoint emerges in their shared acknowledgement, even hope, that humanity could perhaps find a path forward throu…
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Is Alex Garland’s new film a warning or mere provocation? Adam and Josh discuss. Plus, the William Wyler Marathon continues with the 1959 biblical epic “Ben-Hur” and we crown a ‘50s Madness Champ. (Timecodes will not be precise with ads; chapters may start early.) Open (00:00:00-00:02:19) Review: “Civil War” (00:01:58-00:34:16) Next Week / Notes (0…
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The new CIVIL WAR is the latest in a line of speculative scenarios that Alex Garland has pondered over the course of his career as a novelist-turned-filmmaker, but its journey through a country transformed by violent catastrophe is most reminiscent of his first project as a screenwriter, Danny Boyle’s zombie-adjacent horror film 28 DAYS LATER. So b…
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Director and legendary cinematographer Kirsten Johnson is known for nonfiction work that is inventive, artful, expressive, and maximal. The same can be said of the film that blew her mind -- Bob Fosse’s All That Jazz. The semi-autobiographical film brings us Joe Gideon (Roy Scheider), a peripatetic creative force working simultaneously to mount a m…
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What does a powerless gofer in 2020s Romania have in common with a powerful studio executive in 1990s Hollywood? Radu Jude’s new DO NOT EXPECT TO MUCH FROM THE END OF THE WORLD may concern a very different type of moviemaking than that in Robert Altman’s satire THE PLAYER, but it takes a similarly cynical — and humorous — stance on the compromises …
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With Alex Garland’s “Civil War” on the horizon, Adam and Josh take another look at the writer/director’s prescient AI thriller “Ex Machina.” Plus, a spirited debate over 1942’s “Mrs. Miniver” and a finals matchup in Filmspotting Madness—Best of the ‘50s. (Timecodes will not be precise with ads; chapters may start early.) Open (00:00:00-00:02:19) Re…
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Romanian director Radu Jude’s new DO NOT EXPECT TOO MUCH FROM THE END OF THE WORLD is set in Bucharest, not Hollywood, but its cynicism about the act of capturing something on film nonetheless put us in mind of Robert Altman’s 1992 industry satire THE PLAYER. We’re joined by returning guest Katie Rife to discuss these two very different yet complem…
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With the release of a new “Road House” starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Adam and Josh debate the merits of the ‘89 original (there are many merits!), along with recommendations of “Godzilla x Kong” and the doc “Ennio” about composer Ennio Morricone. Plus, the Final 4 round of Filmspotting Madness—Best of the '50s. (Timecodes will not be precise with ads; …
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Like the Wachowskis’ BOUND before it, Rose Glass’ new lesbian crime thriller LOVE LIES BLEEDING is playing with the tropes of noir and pulp, but it is also very much a love story between women who are trapped by their pasts and see in each other a way out. This week we’re joined once again by writer and friend of the show Emily St. James to talk th…
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Adam and Josh praise Rose Glass’s nasty new noir “Love Lies Bleeding” and are knocked out by 1946’s “The Best Years of Our Lives,” William Wyler’s incisive and moving Best Picture winner. Plus, the Elite 8 of ‘50s Filmspotting Madness. (Timecodes will not be precise with ads; chapters may start early.) Open (00:00:00-00:04:01) Review: “Love Lies Bl…
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Rose Glass’ new lesbian crime thriller LOVE LIES BLEEDING takes the neo-noir in a bold and unexpected direction, one that the Wachowskis first pointed the genre toward in 1996 with BOUND. While the sisters’ stylish debut first premiered amid a wave of “sexy thrillers,” it exists today in a significantly different context. We get into that shift thi…
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For its 20th anniversary, Adam and Josh take a deep dive into the intricate world of 2004’s “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.” Plus the first film in the William Wyler Marathon and the Sweet 16 round of ‘50s Filmspotting Madness. (Timecodes will not be precise with ads; chapters may start early.) Open / Oscars (00:00:00-00:06:47) Sacred Cow: …
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Is box-office disappointment DRIVE-AWAY DOLLS destined for the sort of belated appreciation eventually received by the Coen Brothers’ sophomore feature, 1987’s RAISING ARIZONA? That’s up for debate in our discussion of Ethan Coen’s latest comedy collaboration, this time with his wife Tricia Cooke, a crime caper in theory that acts more like a sex r…
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There is much to discuss about Part Two of Denis Villeneuve’s “Dune” adaptation, including a deep dive on “worm juice” in spoiler talk. Plus, Rd. 2 matchups in ‘50s Madness. (Timecodes will not be precise with ads; chapters may start early.) Open (00:00:00-00:02:10) Review: Dune: Part Two (00:02:10-00:43:00) Next Week/Notes (00:43:01-00:54:48) ‘50s…
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While DRIVE-AWAY DOLLS is technically the first narrative feature for which Ethan Coen has taken a solo directing credit, in practice the new comedy is as much a collaboration, here with his wife and co-screenwriter Tricia Cooke, as the films he made with brother Joel before their current hiatus. So in honor of Coen’s commitment to collaborative co…
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