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James Hamblin is a doctor. Katherine Wells is not. But she has a lot of questions. Listen in as Jim and Katherine keep in touch with other journalists, experts, and friends about the latest science and health news⁠—and, more important, what to do with it.Email us with questions, stories, or feedback at socialdistance@theatlantic.com.
 
Some call it Hurricane Katrina. Some call it the Federal Flood. Others call it the day the levees broke. On August 29, 2005, the city of New Orleans was submerged. That story of hubris, incompetence, and nature's wrath is now etched into the national consciousness. But the people who lived through the flood and its aftermath have a different story to tell. A story of rumors, betrayal, and one of the most misunderstood events in American history. Hosted by Vann R. Newkirk II.
 
Building on a 160-year-history of interviews with the world’s most consequential figures, the podcast brings the power of the Atlantic interview to the audio platform—and continues the publisher’s push to bring its journalism to more people in more ways. Jeffrey Goldberg, Editor in Chief talks to some of the most pivotal voices shaping politics, technology, art, media, business, and culture.
 
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While case counts in the U.S. continue to drop, there are still headlines about variants and "breakthrough" infections that might worry you. Fortunately, The Atlantic staff writer Katherine Wu explains to James Hamblin and Maeve Higgins why these shouldn't alarm us just yet. And staff writer Sarah Zhang drops in to help figure out how to keep pande…
 
We've all been suffering during the COVID-19 pandemic in one way or another, and as the U.S. starts to emerge, we'll need to reckon with that. The Atlantic's Ed Yong discusses his piece on pandemic trauma, how to think about it, and what he's learned in talking to psychiatrists and other experts. We want to hear from you! Email your questions or co…
 
When the Biden administration announced support for waiving COVID vaccine patents last week, it was met with praise, relief, skepticism, and alarm among different groups—but surprise all around. Pharmaceutical giants have long fought efforts to have their intellectual property released to meet international needs. And they’ve backed it up with imme…
 
Writer F.T. Kola returns to recount her experience with long COVID. What explains its strange constellation of symptoms? Will it ever go away? And why does vaccination seem to help? F.T., Jim, and Maeve are joined by Dr. Akiko Iwasaki, an immunologist investigating long COVID at her Yale lab. She explains what we know about the condition — and how …
 
While wealthier countries reopen, India and the rest of the world face a terrifying new peak in the pandemic. How did it come to this? What can be done? And with new variants and limited supplies, how does the global vaccine strategy need to change to prevent more coronavirus spikes? Staff writer Yasmeen Serhan joins Jim and Maeve to explain. Jim’s…
 
The pandemic has led to “hygiene theater,” which gives a false sense of security. As vaccination continues, people should feel able to abandon many precautions—while continuing to focus on what really matters. How do we thread the needle between being too cautious and too cavalier? Staff writer Derek Thompson joins to help us understand public mess…
 
Should the ‘pause’ in Johnson & Johnson vaccine worry us? Also, Jim got his first shot! But with so many people experiencing strong reactions to their second doses, what should he — and maybe you — expect? Atlantic staff writer Katherine Wu joins to explain (and stays to talk cicadas!) Support this show and all of The Atlantic’s journalism by becom…
 
Children may have been largely spared the worst of COVID-19, but many kids have still gotten seriously ill and died. Despite promising news this week, most likely won’t have access to the vaccines for months. So as adults get vaccinated, how high are the stakes for kids? And how high are the stakes for everyone waiting on herd immunity? Jim and Mae…
 
Vaccine passports are almost certainly in our near future. But what are they exactly? And with concerns about vaccine equity now complicated by partisan fearmongering, how should they be implemented? Art Caplan, a bioethicist with NYU’s Grossman School of Medicine who’s spent years thinking about vaccine ethics, joins Jim and Maeve to explain. Supp…
 
The recent shootings in Atlanta highlighted a surge of anti-Asian violence in the United States throughout the pandemic. Disease stigma and racism have together shaped pandemic response and policy for centuries. And so to better understand this history, Jim and Maeve speak with Alexandre White, a sociologist and medical historian at Johns Hopkins U…
 
Jim and Maeve answer listener vaccine questions and are joined by Alexis Madrigal, who explains the apparent plateau in cases (and why he’s begun to worry despite his longer-term optimism). With the COVID Tracking Project winding down, Madrigal also offers insight about where to get the best data. Support this show and all of The Atlantic’s journal…
 
Jim and Katherine look back on a year of this pandemic podcast to what we’ve learned, what we haven’t, and what we can look forward to. (Also, Jim talks with Anthony Fauci!) Support this show and all of The Atlantic’s journalism by becoming a subscriber at theatlantic.com/supportus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices…
 
With three vaccines now approved and news that the U.S. will have enough shots for every adult by the end of May, it feels like the country is turning a corner. But, even after getting vaccinated, Americans still have to mask and distance. Why is that? Can you still spread it? And with lots of efficacy numbers out there, is one vaccine ‘better’ tha…
 
Listeners with mild COVID-19 cases call with their questions. Jim explains why he thinks the summer could be wonderful. And Maeve shares nun news from Ireland. Support this show and all of The Atlantic’s journalism by becoming a subscriber at theatlantic.com/supportus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices…
 
Nearly a year ago, The Atlantic staff writer Helen Lewis predicted the pandemic would be “a disaster for feminism” and far too many of her predictions have proven true. With women leaving the workforce at unprecedented rates, why has the pandemic’s burden fallen so much harder on them? And what can we, as a society, do about it? Also: Jim and Maeve…
 
Vaccines are a public good. And if we don’t make a lot more of them, COVID-19 may never really go away. Gregg Gonsalves, an epidemiology professor at Yale’s School of Public Health who joined the show in May to talk about his career as an AIDS activist, explains to Jim and Maeve how our moral failure to help vaccinate the rest of the world may come…
 
A new podcast from The Atlantic and WNYC Studios, The Experiment, tells stories from our unfinished country. On this episode, Vann R. Newkirk II tells the story of his mother's life. Marylin Thurman Newkirk grew up as part of the first generation of Americans who lived in what Vann calls "true democracy" — but that democracy is now at risk. Listen …
 
On the first episode, host Julia Longoria tells the story of the “zone of death,” where a legal glitch could short-circuit the Constitution—a place where, technically, you could get away with murder. At a time when we’re surrounded by preventable deaths, we document one journey to avert disaster. Listen and subscribe to The Experiment: Apple Podcas…
 
On the first episode, host Julia Longoria tells the story of the “zone of death,” where a legal glitch could short-circuit the Constitution—a place where, technically, you could get away with murder. At a time when we’re surrounded by preventable deaths, we document one journey to avert disaster. Listen and subscribe to The Experiment: Apple Podcas…
 
The Brazil variant raises a scary question — and reminds us that herd immunity needs to cross borders. Also: Katherine shares the first episode of The Experiment, a new show from The Atlantic and WNYC Studios. Subscribe to The Experiment here: Apple Podcasts / Google Podcasts / Spotify / Stitcher / Pocket Casts Learn more about your ad choices. Vis…
 
People are getting vaccinated, but it’s not happening quickly enough. Case counts are dropping fast, but a near-record number of people are still sick. Do we have reason for optimism? Or could optimism still get us in trouble? Alexis Madrigal and Robinson Meyer, staff writers and co-founders of the COVID Tracking Project at The Atlantic, join Jim a…
 
Dr. Ruth Faden, an expert in biomedical ethics with Johns Hopkins University, has helped vaccine drives answer some tough questions: Who should be ahead of who? Do we prioritize speed or equity? And once people are inoculated, should they get ‘vaccine passports’ allowing freer movement? She joins James Hamblin and guest host Maeve Higgins to assess…
 
We were supposed to vaccinate 20 million Americans by the end of the year. We’ve fallen well short of that. Should we be worried? Jim and Katherine are joined by Juliette Kayyem, a former Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security who ran intergovernmental efforts like the one behind the vaccine rollout. She explains what’s going on, what the problem…
 
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