show episodes
 
Welcome to The Vernacular Life Podcast! I’m your host, Paige, and I live in an under-renovation 1906 Vernacular Farmhouse with my husband, a veritable herd of cats, some assorted farm animals, and way too many chickens. Tune in each week to learn about the quirks of old house living, the adventure of sympathetic renovations, the heritage of home habits, and pretty much anything and everything that might go on in our turn-of-the-century home. Learn more at farmhousevernacular.com/podcast! So ...
 
Raw, Unfiltered, & Unapolgetic! That's what Roy, Dan & DeVourie will give you every week on their beloved Chicago Bears. It's hard hitting, in your face, no holds barred content! These 3 Kangs (depending on your vernacular) are far from homers & will always give you that real talk... the way a podcast is supposed to!
 
The Sharon Salzberg Metta Hour features Buddhist philosophy in a practical, common sense vernacular. Sharon’s natural wisdom, sense of humor and the ease with which she translates these teachings forge an intimate connection with the listener. From everyday experiences to pithy revelations, each podcast is a journey on the path of self-discovery. Sharon Salzberg is a meditation pioneer, world-renowned teacher, and New York Times bestselling author. She is one of the first to bring mindfulnes ...
 
Vernacular explores faith, culture, and meaning. Despite the cliché, "spiritual but not religious", many people choose to live out their spirituality in a particular religious tradition while refusing to choose between it and modernity. Vernacular is hosted by three Catholics who are fully engaged with both theology and modern culture and who seek meaning for their lives in the space between. If you appreciate simultaneous sci-fi movie references, political critiques, sports-related ranting, ...
 
American Vernacular is a 60-minute public affairs program addressing the political, economic, social, and cultural issues facing our nation from an urban and secular perspective. Hosted by Sandra Booker. Tune in and join the conversation. Monday -Thursday 1:00PM PT. Visit us at www.americanvernacular.org.
 
This podcast explores the vernacular reception of Aristotle and his works in Renaissance Italy as part of the ERC-Funded Vernacular Aristotelianism project (PI: Marco Sgarbi) at the University of Warwick (UK), and at the University of Ca' Foscari in Venice (Italy). The podcast is produced, recorded, edited, and hosted by Dr. Bryan Brazeau, a member of the project at the University of Warwick. For more on the project and the podcast: http://www.tiny.cc/ercaristotle
 
Pooh & Uncle Mike Presenting Uncommon Information and Opinions about Life, Society, Culture, History, Food, Music, Movies And Everything In Between. Spectacular Vernacular from Two Peacefully Astute Healthy Young Brothers Making the World Very Peaceful while Keeping the Wave Alive.So Just Enjoy this Game You Filthy Animal. This Game is Brought Exclusively To you by Veuve Clicquot & Whole Foods. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/verypeaceful/support
 
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Lux Occult

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Lux Occult

Lux Occult Podcast

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Welcome to Lux Occult, a podcast where we gleefully taunt the mundane, butcher the Latin and most other languages, and also discuss a variety of occult topics! Exploring the intersections of Magick, Art, Science and Philosophy- it's Occultism For Everyone!
 
The Chinese Union Version (CUV) (Chinese: 和合本; pinyin: héhé běn; literally "harmonized/united version") is the predominant Chinese language translation of the Bible used by Chinese Protestants. It is considered by many to be the Chinese Protestant’s Bible. The CUV in use today is the vernacular Mandarin version, published in two slightly different editions - the Shen Edition (神版) and the Shangti Edition (上帝版) - differing in the way the word “God” is translated. 聖經 (和合本)(簡稱和合本;或稱國語和合本、官話和合本), ...
 
聖經 (和合本)(簡稱和合本;或稱國語和合本、官話和合本),是今日華語人士最普遍使用的聖經譯本。此譯本的出版起源自1890年在上海舉行的傳教士大會,會中各差會派代表成立了三個委員會,各自負責翻譯《官話和合本》、《淺文理和合譯本》及《文理和合譯本》。 The Chinese Union Version (CUV) (Chinese: 和合本; pinyin: héhé běn; literally "harmonized/united version") is the predominant Chinese language translation of the Bible used by Chinese Protestants. It is considered by many to be the Chinese Protestant’s Bible. The CUV in use today is the vernacular Mandarin version, published in two slightly different editions - the Shen E ...
 
The LANDSPLOITATION Podcast hosts experimental video and audio documenting the social experience of the human landscape, including but not limited to the spaces of the built environment, vernacular architecture, proxemics, human interaction, and political boundaries. Submissions from independent scholars, photographers, and filmmakers are welcome. To submit, please insure that sound or video is hosted on a public server (such as archive.org) and email the link together with a brief descripti ...
 
In this, Chesnutt's first novel, he tells the tragic story of love set against a backdrop of racism, miscegenation and “passing” during the period spanning the antebellum and reconstruction eras in American history. And through his use of the vernacular prevalent in the South of that time, Chesnutt lent a compassionate voice to a group that America did not want to hear. More broadly, however, Chesnutt illustrated, in this character play, the vast and perhaps insurmountable debt this country ...
 
Lime with queeribbean blackademics, Stush an' Bush for their bi-weekly podcast on Caribbean happenings and overall mixup and blend blend, with a queer twist. Stush and Bush, two culturally rooted words, speak to class in Caribbean countries. Both characters engage in this podcast bolstering Caribbean Creole, and immersing listeners in Queeribbean vernacular, serving as a guide to the world of being both Caribbean and queer through their lived experiences coupled with queer and ethnic theorie ...
 
The Coptic Magical Papyri: Vernacular Religion in Late Roman and Early Islamic Egypt is a five-year research project (2018-2023) based at the Chair of Egyptology of the Julius Maximilian University Würzburg. The team consists of Korshi Dosoo (research group leader), Markéta Preininger, and Julia Schwarzer (formerly also Edward O.D. Love). We bring you what we know about Coptic magic in the form of academic publications, blogs and podcast episodes! http://www.coptic-magic.phil.uni-wuerzburg.de/
 
Your Voice is a platform created by Aapka Times for youngsters to show their talent to the world. YV provides space to the aspiring poets,storytellers and other artists to show their talent through its Events. YV also aims to produce vernacular digital content and already producing content in English,Hindi,Urdu, Bangla, Bhojpuri and Malayalam. For Advertisement and Brand Collaboration Reach to us at || yourvoiceat@gmail.com || You too can share your poetry with us on our Facebook & Instagram ...
 
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SASSpod

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SASSpod

Center for South Asia

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The South Asian Studies at Stanford (SASS) Podcast features conversations between the Center for South Asia at Stanford and guests who have a connection to Stanford as faculty, staff, students, or alumni. The podcasts feature a wide range of topics, ranging from poetry to politics, from manuscript collecting to music, from business to Bollywood. Every podcast consists of an informal and informative conversation about South Asia and its meaning in the world, in our lives, and at Stanford.
 
If Portlandia and Welcome To Night Vale had a baby it would be Welcome Thru Effingham. It's the city everyone has passed through and no one stops to explore. Until now, of course. Enjoy the characters and stories (that we made up) from the Crossroads of America; Effingham, IL. All characters and events in this show - even those based on real people - are entirely fictional. All celebrity voices are impersonated - poorly. The following program contains clean comedy and due to its content shou ...
 
By: Giovanni Boccaccio (1313-1375) Giovanni Boccaccio’s The Decameron is a collection of novellas or short novels written during the 14th century. There are 100 tales contained in the book which is presented together. The book’s title The Decameron combines the two Greek words “deka” meaning ten and “hemera” meaning day. The title can be literally translated as “ten day,” which is also the time frame in which the stories are told by the 7 young women and 3 young men. In the book, each of the ...
 
Kabir (1440 - 1518) was a mystic poet and saint of India, whose writings have greatly influenced the Bhakti movement.The name Kabir comes from Arabic Al-Kabir which means 'The Great' - the 37th Name of God in the Qur'an.Kabir was influenced by the prevailing religious mood of his times, such as old Brahmanic Hinduism, Hindu and Buddhist Tantrism, the teachings of Nath yogis and the personal devotionalism of South India mixed with the imageless God of Islam. The influence of these various doc ...
 
The only hour of radio that's neither an hour, nor on radio. These are Science fiction and fantasy stories from the intimidating collection of the Story Keeper. SILENCE! Each episode is written by a different author and performed in front of a live audience by members of the Collapsing Horse ensemble. Come in and wonder at the variety, the virtuosity, the vernacular, and the venereal. Welcome to the Collapsing Horse Science Fiction Radio Hour! Presented by DMC Radio. You can support the show ...
 
Cædmon was an Anglo-Saxon herdsman attached to the double monastery of Streonæshalch (657–681). Originally ignorant of the art of song, Cædmon learned to compose one night in the course of a dream. Cædmon’s only known surviving work is Cædmon’s Hymn, the nine-line alliterative vernacular praise poem in honour of the Christian god he supposedly learned to sing in his initial dream. The poem is one of the earliest attested examples of Old English and is one of three candidates for the earliest ...
 
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Science Indica

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Science Indica

Shilpa Jacob , Veena Varun

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Science is for people who want to make some kind of change in the world. No matter whether you like/bother it or not, all of us want to make a difference in the world, in some kind of way. Then undoubtedly, science is for you. Science affects all of us, science is for everyone. That's the very idea behind Science Indica. It is science that provides solutions for everyday life and helps us solving or addressing the secrets and puzzles of this Universe, possibly Multiverse. Science Indica is a ...
 
You don’t need a PhD in linguistics to explore interesting, unique features of different languages. In this podcast, “Language Matters” by Diplomatic Language Services, we make language accessible to everyday people by discussing features which may not exist in other languages. For instance, unless you have studied a Slavic language, you may not be familiar with “verbs of motion”, but we can teach you! Join us each episode as we host experts to discuss how these unique features impact learni ...
 
Hey dude*, what's this all about? So stoked you asked, my man.* California's What? is a podcast that explores the things and people in the Golden State that make you ask "what?". You'll learn some cool spots. You'll meet some awesome people. You'll have your brain tickled a bit and it'll feel good, bro.* Discover the best of what California has to offer. Explore places you've only seen in your dreams, or maybe on TV. Learn what the Golden State means to the people who live here, the ones tha ...
 
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show series
 
There are so many colors in the world, but how to make them play nicely together? Oh, just a little color theory to tame those tints, tones, and hues to create a stunning display in any space in your home! In this episode, you’ll hear: Why monochromatic doesn’t have to mean all white How to walk your way through the color wheel so you can spin that…
 
Against a groundswell of critiques of global English, Vernacular English: Reading the Anglophone in Postcolonial India (Princeton UP, 2022) argues that literary studies are yet to confront the true political import of the English language in the world today. A comparative study of three centuries of English literature and media in India, this origi…
 
Textiles were the second-most-traded commodity in world history, preceded only by grain. In the Ottoman Empire, in particular, the sale and exchange of silks, cottons, and woolens generated an immense amount of revenue. They touched every level of society, from rural women tending silkworms to pashas flaunting layers of watered camlet to merchants …
 
The Venice Ghetto was founded in 1516 by the Venetian government as a segregated area of the city in which Jews were compelled to live. The world's first ghetto and the origin of the English word, the term simultaneously works to mark specific places and their histories, and as a global symbol that evokes themes of identity, exile, marginalization,…
 
What are the connections between the past and modern politics? In Heritage and Nationalism: Understanding Populism through Big Data (UCL Press, 2022), Chiara Bonacchi, a Chancellor's Fellow in Heritage, Text and Data Mining and Senior Lecturer in Heritage at History, Classics & Archaeology and Edinburgh Futures Institute at University of Edinburgh,…
 
Europeans have been writing about China for centuries–ever since The Travels of Marco Polo described it as a faraway and mystical kingdom. European thinkers like Voltaire and Montesquieu used China to support their own theories of political philosophy, then writers in early modernity tried to explain why China was falling behind–and then, with the …
 
In a mere four years, England’s monastic tradition—one of the richest in all of Europe—came to an end. The Dissolution of the Monasteries, as it’s come to be known, stands in popular consciousness as a token of religious reformation and muscular government. But the Dissolution is wrapped up in partisan narratives that have obscured the role of the …
 
Sabdanugamah (Sanskrit Library, 2021) is the first of two volumes of studies in honor of Professor George Cardona, the preeminent authority on Paninian grammar and the linguistic traditions of India as well as one of the worlds leading scholars of Indo-European linguistics. These studies cover topics in Paninian grammar, other Indian linguistic tra…
 
In a mere four years, England’s monastic tradition—one of the richest in all of Europe—came to an end. The Dissolution of the Monasteries, as it’s come to be known, stands in popular consciousness as a token of religious reformation and muscular government. But the Dissolution is wrapped up in partisan narratives that have obscured the role of the …
 
The Prince of Wales College, Achimota School, opened in 1927 north of Accra in the Gold Coast (Ghana). Achimota was to be a ‘model’ school—but a model of what, exactly? And for whom? Shoko Yamada’s book 'Dignity of Labour' for African Leaders: The Formation of Education Policy in the British Colonial Office and Achimota School (Langaa RPCIG, 2018) …
 
When Charles II ascended the English throne in 1660 after two decades of civil war, he was confronted with domestic disarray and a sprawling empire in chaos. His government sought to assert control and affirm the King’s sovereignty by touting his stewardship of both England’s land and the improvement of his subjects’ health. In An Empire Transforme…
 
Transoceanic Perspectives in Amitav Ghosh’s Ibis Trilogy (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021) studies Ghosh’s Sea of Poppies (2008), River of Smoke (2011) and Flood of Fire (2015) in relation to maritime criticism. Juan-José Martín-González draws upon the intersections between maritime criticism and postcolonial thought to provide, via an analysis of the Ibi…
 
When Charles II ascended the English throne in 1660 after two decades of civil war, he was confronted with domestic disarray and a sprawling empire in chaos. His government sought to assert control and affirm the King’s sovereignty by touting his stewardship of both England’s land and the improvement of his subjects’ health. In An Empire Transforme…
 
What is the hidden history of performers of colour in in British theatre? In British Black and Asian Shakespeareans: Integrating Shakespeare, 1966–2018 (Arden Shakespeare, 2022), Jami Rogers, an honorary fellow at Department of English at University of Warwick, examines this question with one of the most central parts of British theatre and culture…
 
Dave Neal returns to join Luxa for conversation about power, social change, conformity, and control viewed through the lens of Sociology. It’s meta-context galore! But wait, there’s more: Shane Thomas stops in for an episode within the episode about implementing one’s personal code of ethics which includes a side of pokemancy. Also for your enjoyme…
 
Against a groundswell of critiques of global English, Vernacular English: Reading the Anglophone in Postcolonial India (Princeton UP, 2022) argues that literary studies are yet to confront the true political import of the English language in the world today. A comparative study of three centuries of English literature and media in India, this origi…
 
Against a groundswell of critiques of global English, Vernacular English: Reading the Anglophone in Postcolonial India (Princeton UP, 2022) argues that literary studies are yet to confront the true political import of the English language in the world today. A comparative study of three centuries of English literature and media in India, this origi…
 
Most stories of medical progress come with ready-made heroes. John Snow traced the origins of London's 1854 cholera outbreak to a water pump, leading to the birth of epidemiology. Florence Nightingale's contributions to the care of soldiers in the Crimean War revolutionized medical hygiene, transforming hospitals from crucibles of infection to sanc…
 
Against a groundswell of critiques of global English, Vernacular English: Reading the Anglophone in Postcolonial India (Princeton UP, 2022) argues that literary studies are yet to confront the true political import of the English language in the world today. A comparative study of three centuries of English literature and media in India, this origi…
 
Art historian Catherine McCormack challenges how culture teaches us to see and value women, their bodies, and their lives. Venus, maiden, wife, mother, monster—women have been bound so long by these restrictive roles, codified by patriarchal culture, that we scarcely see them. In Women in the Picture: What Culture Does with Female Bodies (Norton, 2…
 
Hitting the studio with the The Dirty Rats crew was one of the dopest things I ever did! The Dirty Rats have been doing it around here for over 20 years and we covered a ton of their history. From opening for Digital Underground, Too Short, and doing shows around here for decades, to their trip to Japan, their creative process, what the got into be…
 
In the early twentieth century, Khunu Lama journeyed across Tibet and India, meeting Buddhist masters while sometimes living, so his students say, on cold porridge and water. Yet this elusive wandering renunciant became a revered teacher of the Fourteenth Dalai Lama. At Khunu Lama’s death in 1977, he was mourned by Himalayan nuns, Tibetan lamas, an…
 
In Race, Culture and Media (Sage, 2021), Anamik Saha provides an account of the role that media plays in both circulating and shaping ideas about race and racism in the contemporary world. Saha argues that we need to move beyond a focus on representation to engage with how media makes race. As Anamik describes in our interview, alongside providing …
 
Alice Dailey’s How to Do Things with Dead People: History, Technology, and Temporality from Shakespeare to Warhol (Cornell University Press, 2022) is an exploration of Shakespeare’s chronicle plays through the theoretical rubric of modern technology. Dailey is Professor of English at Villanova University and is the author of the monograph The Engli…
 
Alice Dailey’s How to Do Things with Dead People: History, Technology, and Temporality from Shakespeare to Warhol (Cornell University Press, 2022) is an exploration of Shakespeare’s chronicle plays through the theoretical rubric of modern technology. Dailey is Professor of English at Villanova University and is the author of the monograph The Engli…
 
Elizabeth Oyler and Katherine Saltzman-Li's book Cultural Imprints: War and Memory in the Samurai Age (Cornell UP, 2022) draws on literary works, artifacts, performing arts, and documents that were created by or about the samurai to examine individual "imprints," traces holding specifically grounded historical meanings that persist through time. Th…
 
Today’s world is unpredictable and full of contradictions, and navigating its complexities while trying to make the best decisions is far from easy. The Joy of Science (Princeton UP, 2022) presents 8 short lessons on how to unlock the clarity, empowerment, and joy of thinking and living a little more scientifically. In this brief guide to leading a…
 
Emma Natalya Stein's book Constructing Kanchi: City of Infinite Temples (Amsterdam UP, 2021) traces the emergence of the South Indian city of Kanchi as a major royal capital and multireligious pilgrimage destination during the era of the Pallava and Chola dynasties (circa seventh through thirteenth centuries). It presents the first-ever comprehensi…
 
As the world confronts the largest refugee crisis since World War II, wealthy countries are being called upon to open their doors to the displaced, with the assumption that this will restore their prospects for a bright future. Refuge: How the State Shapes Human Potential (Princeton UP, 2022) follows Syrians who fled a brutal war in their homeland …
 
What is the future for the House of Commons? In Held in Contempt: What’s Wrong with the House of Commons? Hannah White, Deputy Director of the Institute for Government, sets out a critique of the way a key institution at the heart of British democracy is failing to deliver for citizens, staff, and Members alike. Set against the backdrop of Brexit, …
 
What is the potential of hydrogen energy in architecture? How can we store energy? Can concrete rival timber as a sustainable building material? These questions answered and many more when we ask international sustainabilty expert Chris Twinn from Twinn Sustainability Innovation about sustainability in the latest Architecture Academy Podcast. https…
 
I love my floors. Like love love them. They are original to the house, and though Douglas Fir is by no means considered a high-quality material, I would never DREAM of getting rid of them. We put a lot of labor into saving and restoring them and I am over the moon with the results. So let’s talk about my floors! In this episode, you’ll hear: Why I’…
 
Ratan Kumar Roy's book Television in Bangladesh: News and Audiences (Routledge, 2020) examines the role of 24/7 television news channels in Bangladesh. By using a multi-sited ethnography of television news media, it showcases the socio-political undercurrents of media practices and the everydayness of TV news in Bangladesh. It discusses a wide gamu…
 
The Benin Bronzes are among the British Museum’s most prized possessions. Celebrated for their great beauty, they embody the history, myth and artistry of the ancient Kingdom of Benin, once West Africa’s most powerful, and today part of Nigeria. But despite the Bronzes’ renown, little has been written about the brutal imperial violence with which t…
 
Are humans the only dreamers on Earth? What goes on in the minds of animals when they sleep? When Animals Dream: The Hidden World of Animal Consciousness (Princeton UP, 2022) brings together behavioral and neuroscientific research on animal sleep with philosophical theories of dreaming. It shows that dreams provide an invaluable window into the cog…
 
Performer, author, and storyteller Joél Leon returns to the Metta Hour Podcast for Episode 183. Today's podcast is brought to you by BetterHelp. Click to receive 10% off your first month with your own licensed professional therapist: betterhelp.com/metta Born and raised in the Bronx, Joél writes and tells stories for Black people. Specializing in m…
 
Britain in the 1840s should have been, observes Simon Heffer, a time of great social improvement. Instead it was a country that was beset by poverty, unrest, assassination attempts on young Queen Victoria and her Prime Minister, and fears of revolution. Yet just forty years later, it was as if none of that had ever happened. It had become a prosper…
 
To many the city might seem simply a large urban area to live within, but it actually forms an important political concept and community that has been influential throughout European history. From the polis of Ancient Greece, to the Roman Republic, to the city-states of the Italian Renaissance, and down to the present day. Modern concepts of democr…
 
In the years between the American Revolution and the Civil War, there was an awkward persistence of sovereign rituals, vestiges of a monarchical past that were not easy to shed. In Awkward Rituals: Sensations of Governance in Protestant America (U Chicago Press, 2022), Dana Logan focuses our attention on these performances, revealing the ways in wh…
 
Before the nineteenth century, travelers who left Britain for the Americas, West Africa, India and elsewhere encountered a medical conundrum: why did they fall ill when they arrived, and why - if they recovered - did they never become so ill again? The widely accepted answer was that the newcomers needed to become 'seasoned to the climate'. In his …
 
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