Episode #11: Monica Minnegal and Victoria Stead

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We’re back, live from Tim's lounge! Episode eleven see the podcast return to a roundtable format with two outstanding anthropologists who’ve both recently published books about land rights and development in Papua New Guinea: Monica Minnegal and Victoria Stead. Monica is Associate Professor in Anthropology at the University of Melbourne many years working with Gubor and Bedamuní people in Papua New Guinea, studying the impacts of modernity on their understandings and practices. Most recently, Monica is the author, with Peter Dwyer, of Navigating the Future: An Ethnography of Change in Papua New Guinea (ANU Press, 2017). Victoria is DECRA Research Fellow at the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation. Her research has a strong Pacific focus, and she is the author of Becoming Landowners: Entanglements of Custom and Modernity in Papua New Guinea and Timor-Leste (University of Hawaii Press, 2017). Some further reading: Minnegal M and Dwyer PD. (2017) Navigating the future: An ethnography of change in Papua New Guinea, Canberra: ANU Press. Stead V. (2017) Becoming landowners: Entanglements of custom and modernity in Papua New Guinea and Timor-Leste, Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. Minnegal M, King TJ, Just R, et al. (2003) Deep identity, shallow time: sustaining a future in Victorian fishing communities. The Australian Journal of Anthropology 14: 53-71. Minnegal M, Lefort S and Dwyer PD. (2015) Reshaping the social: A comparison of Fasu and Kubo-Febi approaches to incorporating land groups. The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology 16: 496-513. Stead V. (2015) Homeland, territory, property: Contesting land, state, and nation in urban Timor-Leste. Political Geography 45: 79-89. Stead V. (2018) History as Resource: Moral Reckonings with Place and with the Wartime Past in Oro Province, Papua New Guinea. Anthropological Forum.

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