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Lies, damned lies and statistics: Fact-checking, the new journalism

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Manage episode 165889272 series 101471
Content provided by Humanities and Social Sciences Archives - Pod Academy and Social Sciences Archives - Pod Academy. All podcast content including episodes, graphics, and podcast descriptions are uploaded and provided directly by Humanities and Social Sciences Archives - Pod Academy and Social Sciences Archives - Pod Academy or their podcast platform partner. If you believe someone is using your copyrighted work without your permission, you can follow the process outlined here https://player.fm/legal.

“A lie can get halfway around the world before the truth can get its boots on,” said Winston Churchill. If that was the case then, how much more valid is it today. The explosion of social media and its ability to circulate and generate misinformaton has completely changed the political landscape.

And it has led to a whole new branch of journalism – political fact-checking.

This interview was first posted on the New Books Network and was conducted in the heat of the 2016 US Presidential Election campaign. In it, Lucas Graves, assistant professor in the school of journalism and mass communication at the University of Wisconsin Madison talks to James Kates about the emergence of fact checking as a necessary, if often maligned , attempt to get at the this elusive thing called ‘truth’.

As George Orwell said, “Political language is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable….”

Lucas Graves book, Deciding What’s True: The Rise of Political Fact-Checking in American Journalism came out in 2016 from Columbia University Press

Photo of bumper sticker in parking lot near school. By WoodleyWonderWorks

Photo of bumper sticker in parking lot near school. By WoodleyWonderWorks

The post Lies, damned lies and statistics: Fact-checking, the new journalism appeared first on Pod Academy.

  continue reading

163 episodes

Artwork
iconShare
 
Manage episode 165889272 series 101471
Content provided by Humanities and Social Sciences Archives - Pod Academy and Social Sciences Archives - Pod Academy. All podcast content including episodes, graphics, and podcast descriptions are uploaded and provided directly by Humanities and Social Sciences Archives - Pod Academy and Social Sciences Archives - Pod Academy or their podcast platform partner. If you believe someone is using your copyrighted work without your permission, you can follow the process outlined here https://player.fm/legal.

“A lie can get halfway around the world before the truth can get its boots on,” said Winston Churchill. If that was the case then, how much more valid is it today. The explosion of social media and its ability to circulate and generate misinformaton has completely changed the political landscape.

And it has led to a whole new branch of journalism – political fact-checking.

This interview was first posted on the New Books Network and was conducted in the heat of the 2016 US Presidential Election campaign. In it, Lucas Graves, assistant professor in the school of journalism and mass communication at the University of Wisconsin Madison talks to James Kates about the emergence of fact checking as a necessary, if often maligned , attempt to get at the this elusive thing called ‘truth’.

As George Orwell said, “Political language is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable….”

Lucas Graves book, Deciding What’s True: The Rise of Political Fact-Checking in American Journalism came out in 2016 from Columbia University Press

Photo of bumper sticker in parking lot near school. By WoodleyWonderWorks

Photo of bumper sticker in parking lot near school. By WoodleyWonderWorks

The post Lies, damned lies and statistics: Fact-checking, the new journalism appeared first on Pod Academy.

  continue reading

163 episodes

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