140: Mixed Messages About Keto, Hypopituitarism, Convincing Skeptics Saturated Fat Is Healthy, Insulin Pump And Ketosis, Type 1 Diabetic Weight Gain On Keto

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In Episode 140 of Keto Talk, Jimmy and Dr. Will Cole answer your questions about Mixed Messages About Keto, Hypopituitarism, Convincing Skeptics Saturated Fat Is Healthy, Insulin Pump And Ketosis, Type 1 Diabetic Weight Gain On Keto, and more!

HOT TOPICS:

  • Will’s Functional Medicine perspective on Jimmy Moore’s upcoming 6-month sabbatical (what to expect, the mental challenge, health changes that should happen, and acclimating to the work load again when he returns)
  • Is cutting back on fat the first change to make when weight loss isn’t happening on keto?
  • What are the effects of long-term ketosis on female reproductive hormones, specifically estrogen production?
  • Since the liver needs glucose to convert T4 to T3, does this mean keto leads women especially to develop hypothyroid unless they eat some whole food carbohydrates?
  • How can I deal with the continued hormonal headaches that are reduced but not completely eliminated with keto?
  • Is it true that there may be some health concerns associated with consuming cooked fats (i.e. makes them more carcinogenic).
“As a rule I don't use avocado or olive oil for cooking because butter, coconut oil, lard, and all these stable saturated fats do such a great job for cooking.” – Jimmy Moore “I think being proactive and addressing health issues before they become serious is a brave move and one that is a counter cultural idea.” – Dr. Will Cole

HEALTH HEADLINES:

Jimmy and Will answer your questions:

– Are concerns over lack of nutrients and acidity in the body on keto valid? How can you cut through the confusing mixed messages on keto?

Hello guys,

I am incredibly frustrated with my keto experience so far and hoping you can help. I am a 5'3" female and weigh 155 pounds. I started this journey to help me with brain fog, afternoon slumps, and energy level issues and I finally started to feel better after a really rough two months trying to get keto-adapted. While I have gotten better now, it seems to be a bumpy ride so far. As a runner I’m seeing a negative impact on my endurance, my menstrual cycles have become very intense, and I’ve experience zero weight loss (although that’s not a goal, it would be nice to see). I’ve been doing a ton of research and listening to podcasts trying to figure out if I’m doing something wrong and perhaps seeing if getting the benefits of keto is any different for women as compared with men. I hear things about keto causing acidity in the body which is the precursor to the development of disease and it kinda freaks me out. My diet is very rigid most of the time eating mostly organic foods, very little red meat, and focused on fish, chicken, turkey, and more vegetables thanks to reading Ketotarian and Dr. Anna Cabeca’s new book. I’m ready to give up on my keto plan because of the lack of nutrients and acidity concerns. There seems to be so many mixed messages about keto that I don’t know what to believe and how to do it the right way for me. My desire is to be healthy, not skinny. Can you help me out?

Thank you for answering my question,

Dana

– Why would ketones not show up in blood testing from two years of eating very low-carb? Does it have to do with hypopituitarism and will keto perhaps help with this?

Hi Jimmy and Dr. Cole,

I’m a huge fan of Keto Talk and I learn something new every time I listen! I have been eating real food keto staying under 20g of carbs daily for the past two years but have never registered more than .02 on my blood ketone meter. Is this normal for someone who has hypopituitarism? Can eating low-carb, high-fat, ketogenic help with this?

Thanks again for all you do,

Danielle

– How do you convince friends who think saturated fat and cholesterol are leading to heart disease on keto? Are there third party resources that can explain all of this?

Hey Jimmy and Will,

Saturated fat and cholesterol are the primary concerns that my vegan and vegetarian (and even my SAD dieter) friends point to when it comes to the keto diet. Even when I point out that plant-based food sources such as coconut and olive oil both have more saturated fat than most animal-based foods, they argue that this way of eating will raise cholesterol and saturated fat levels in the blood which will inevitably lead to atherosclerosis and heart disease. I’ve asked them to read your book Cholesterol Clarity, Jimmy, but my very intelligent and mostly skeptical friends want resources from “unbiased” sources since you are a prominent figure in the keto space. I really need some third party resources to share with them about the healthy role of saturated fat, cholesterol, and why a ketogenic diet is a positive thing for the body. I’m shared about Nina Teicholz’s book The Big Fat Surprise as well as the Joe Rogan podcast debate between vegan Dr. Joel Kahn and Paleo diet practitioner Chris Kresser. Do you have other suggestions?

Thanks for your help!

Jodi

– Does being a Type 1 diabetic using an insulin pump make it that much more difficult to get into a state of nutritional ketosis?

Hello Jimmy and Dr. Cole,

I am a Type 1 diabetic since before I was 2 years old and I’m on an insulin pump as well as dealing with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, Hashimoto’s thyroid, and celiac. I eat low-carb keto and my blood sugars stay in tight control. My thyroid levels are very good thanks to the Nature-throid medication I use. But here’s my problem—I can never get into a state of nutritional ketosis. Is it because I’m on an insulin pump and there is a constant flow of basal insulin being injected into my body? Over the years, I know I've become insulin resistant and have gained weight especially in my midsection. I'm 47 years old and ever tried working with a personal trainer for two years…but all I did was gain more weight in my belly. Why is my body holding onto fat and not burning it when I’m eating keto?

Thank you for helping me with this puzzle,

Harmeet

KETO TALK MAILBOX:

– Why would a Type 1 diabetic getting good ketone levels struggling with weight loss unless calories are significantly reduced?

Hello Jimmy and Dr. Cole,

I'm 54 years old, 5’2”, and 143 pounds, and needing to lose just a few more pounds. I currently have 25% body fat and lift weights regularly. I've been a lot like you, Jimmy, trying all different kinds of diets and reducing calories—but nothing seemingly works! I know I got too hypocaloric at one point and increased my calories again. I’m a Type 1 diabetic on an insulin pump and don’t need very much insulin because I keep carbs below 20g, 70-80g protein, and fats from eggs, avocados, butter, cheese, and fatty meats. My blood ketones are in the healthy range of 0.7-1.9. As much as I believe in keto, I can’t deal with gaining weight. The only time I’ve seen the scale move is when I’ve cut calories to 1100 a day. But I know that’s not a healthy level for me to be consuming long-term. Why is this so hard for me? It feels like all of the low-calorie, low-fat diets I’ve always suffered with. I really thought keto was different from those.

Please help me figure this out.

Sherri

ITUNES REVIEWS:

139 episodes available. A new episode about every 10 days averaging 67 mins duration .