Max Ruge and Kathryn Henshaw Discuss Full-Length MCAT Exams for the PreMed Virtual Summit

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By Renee Marinelli MD of MedSchoolCoach. Discovered by Player FM and our community — copyright is owned by the publisher, not Player FM, and audio is streamed directly from their servers. Hit the Subscribe button to track updates in Player FM, or paste the feed URL into other podcast apps.

The PreMedSummit is this week! Here is another sneak preview of Max discussing MCAT practice exams with MedSchoolCoach tutor Kathryn Henshaw. If you haven't done so already, visit thepremedsummit.com to register for the whole event!

[1:05] The components of a full-length MCAT exam.

It is an exam that mimics the MCAT exactly. When taking a full-length exam, you can expect it to last about eight hours. You get all four breaks just like the MCAT, along with all four sections. Kathryn recommends taking a full-length before studying for the MCAT as a diagnostic test.

[6:02] The role of full-length exams once you have started studying.

It varies according to where you are in your study schedule. Most students schedule so that they’re reading the books first and then doing practice questions as they get closer to the exam. It’s not necessary to take frequent practice tests if you’re still reading your MCAT books. Kathryn recommends doing one roughly every month. Getting closer to the test day, Kathryn says you should take one every week. They will be your best learning tool at this point.

[9:29] Getting a low mark on a full-length.

When deciding if you will push your test, the first thing to ask is if you ran out of time and would have done better if you didn’t. Also, look at the types of mistakes you made. In general, if you’re more than five points away from your target store a few weeks before your exam, you probably won’t meet it.

[13:06] Kathryn’s recommendations after AMC tests.

Kathryn prefers Next Step for third-party exams. They have sections that are better at mimicking the tests than other companies. Overall, you can’t completely extrapolate how you’ll do on test day based on any third-party exam.

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